Campaigners have taken part in a vigil outside the

first_imgCampaigners have taken part in a vigil outside the Royal Courts of Justice, as the high court was hearing claims by a disabled woman that new benefit rules are “unfair and discriminatory”.Regulations that came into force in March mean that people who are unable to plan or undertake a journey due to overwhelming psychological distress now receive fewer qualifying points when assessed for personal independence payment (PIP).The new rules mean that many PIP claimants are entitled to a lower level of financial support for their mobility, and in many cases no mobility support at all.The legal challenge against work and pensions secretary David Gauke is being brought by RF, who believes that the changes to PIP will have a “significant negative impact” on her life and on the lives of many others who experience significant mental distress.Both the Equality and Human Rights Commission and the mental health charity Mind have submitted written evidence supporting RF’s case.Sara Lomri, RF’s solicitor and deputy legal director of the Public Law Project, said: “[RF] has told me that losing enhanced PIP mobility means she will not be able to get the support she needs to travel.“This will have a huge impact on her ability to participate in society and her independence.”The court’s ruling is expected before Christmas.Among those who took part in a vigil outside the Royal Courts of Justice on the first day of the two-day hearing was Rose*, who said the new regulations could easily affect her level of support.She currently receives the higher rate care component of disability living allowance and the lower rate mobility component, and she said she was “constantly living in dread of being called up for my [PIP] assessment”.She said: “My psychological distress does affect my mobility. I have severe dissociation which causes me to wander around without any knowledge of danger.“I think it’s time for justice for us because we have been discriminated against and there is such a lack of understanding of psychological distress.”She added: “It is criminal the way we are being treated. It is just not right. I had other plans for my life, not to live on benefits, but unfortunately I have to because of my mental health problems.“I am shocked about how we are made to feel bad for being unwell.”Paula Peters (pictured, front), a member of the national steering group of Disabled People Against Cuts, is still waiting to be assessed for PIP, as a long-term claimant of disability living allowance, and currently receives mobility support because of the psychological distress caused by travelling.She said the case was “fundamentally important” to her and the many thousands of others who also need the support to travel.Without that mobility support from DLA, or PIP, she would not have a Freedom Pass, which allows her free travel across the capital, so she can attend GP and hospital appointments, and take part in campaigning.Without the support from PIP, many people with mental distress would be excluded from society and imprisoned at home, she said.Peters said: “We get the mobility component of PIP for deep psychological distress because it is so vital for our mental wellbeing and being able to get to appointments, to interact with friends and family and just take part in everyday life.“That exclusion ramps up anxiety and causes people’s depression to worsen and in my case ramps up my agoraphobia.”Asked how much she trusted DWP on mental health issues, she said: “I don’t. I don’t trust DWP on anything.“They are targeting mental health claimants on PIP, on ESA, on universal credit, on the Work and Health Programme.“They are about ramping up the mental distress and causing a claimant’s mental health to deteriorate to the point where they want to give up and take their own life, and in many cases already have done, and we remember those who are not with us today.“I think DWP are trivialising mental health. What they can’t see, they don’t believe exists.”Denise McKenna (pictured, back right), co-founder of the Mental Health Resistance Network, who also took part in the vigil, said: “For a lot of people with severe mental health problems they cannot travel by public transport, they are having to use taxis for part of their journey, sometimes for all of their journey.“It is very important that people should not become isolated. Isolation is a key precipitate of suicide and relapse. There could be fatal consequences.”She said people with mental health problems were “being targeted by the government from all directions”, through cuts to out-of-work benefits and PIP, and the withdrawal of mental health services and the focus on employment in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services.She said: “People with mental health problems are being targeted to get back into the workplace and [the PIP changes are] an additional barrier to getting to work.“It is part of a huge assault on people with mental health problems. One of the things they are doing is denying the existence of mental distress. They are negating it.”She added: “I wanted to be here today, because having been involved in a judicial review I know what an emotional roller-coaster [it can be].“I think it’s important for people taking the judicial review to know how much it means to other people and to get support from as many people as possible.“We recognise it is in all of our interests.”Claire Glasman (pictured, left), from the campaigning organisation WinVisible – which supports disabled women, including those who are traumatised, such as rape and sexual abuse survivors, and refugee survivors of genocide – said the government was “discriminating against people with mental distress”.She said that disabled women needed PIP mobility support “to be able to get out of the house and to do things in the community, see friends and get involved in groups”.Glasman said: “It just shows they don’t care, they don’t care if people have all the benefits that they need to be able to live our lives and get out of the house.“Theresa May makes all these announcements about mental health being a priority but we know the NHS is being cut, and women’s services are struggling through lack of funding.”Lisa Longstaff, a spokeswoman for Women Against Rape, another campaigner at the vigil, said she was there because so many of the women her organisation worked with – including traumatised women who had been raped – had had their benefits cut unfairly.She said: “I am here because this case is an example of many of the other cuts we have been fighting together.”RF argues that the new PIP regulations violate article 14 of the European Convention on Human Rights, which prohibits unjustifiable discrimination, including discrimination on the basis of disability.She argues that people with overwhelming psychological distress are treated less favourably than those with other conditions, when assessed on their need for mobility support.DWP has told RF’s lawyers that the new rules can be justified.RF also argues that DWP should have carried out a consultation on the new regulations before they were introduced, whereas DWP has said that it had always been its intention to exclude psychological distress from certain questions in the PIP eligibility test, and so there was no need to carry out a fresh consultation in 2017.But RF’s lawyers say that if those organisations involved in the original PIP consultation had been told this, they would have challenged it at the time by campaigning and lobbying politicians.A DWP spokeswoman said the department could not comment on an ongoing legal case.But she pointed to a statement made earlier this year by the minister for disabled people, explaining the reasons for the new regulations, and a departmental statement issued on the same day in February.In the statement, DWP said that “people who cannot carry out a journey because of a visual or cognitive impairment are likely to need more support than someone who experiences psychological distress when they undertake a journey, for example as a result of social phobia or anxiety”.The department added: “Recent legal judgments have interpreted the assessment criteria for PIP in ways that are different to what was originally intended.“The government is now making amendments to clarify the criteria, to restore the original aim of the policy and ensure support goes to those most in need.”*Not her real namelast_img read more

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Ridge on Sunday John McDonnell Shadow Chancellor

first_imgRidge on SundayJohn McDonnell, Shadow Chancellor, talked about Labour’s Brexit policy and antisemitism in the party.Brexit…On Labour backing another EU referendum: “We saw only two weeks ago the EU representatives were keen to negotiate with us… therefore we’ll still be pushing for [Labour’s deal] but we respect the view that if we can’t get that, we will have to break the log jam by going back to the people. It’s not what we want but it’s what we’ve been forced into.”On whether the move will harm Labour electorally: “I think electoral calculation goes out the window now, we’ve got to look for the long-term interests of our country and our people.”On whipping MPs for another referendum: “I’m sure I think on this we would see a whip but also you have got to respect people’s views and their constituency interest as well.”On frontbench support: “… you’d expect the frontbench to support it but as I say, you know, we’ve got to respect people’s views on this.”On attending the next People’s Vote march: “Well I’ll think about it, certainly!  I’m not one to miss a good march but I also have to say as well that I don’t want to do anything or say anything that disrespects the people who strongly, in my own constituency and elsewhere, supported Leave.”Antisemitism…Does the Labour Party have a problem with antisemitism? “Well we clearly do, yes, we clearly do. Look, these allegations that the Labour Party is institutionally antisemitic I reject completely but clearly we do… It’s 0.1% of our membership seem to have been involved in some form of antisemitism. It’s a tiny number but it’s still a problem.”Does Jeremy Corbyn need to do more? “We’re all doing a lot more.”On Momentum’s latest video on antisemitism on the left: “I was attacked for retweeting that video but actually I think it was spot on.”Labour splits…On whether Tom Watson’s policy group for social democratic MPs is a ‘party within a party’: “No, no. We have different groups within the Labour Party, we have the Socialist Campaign, which I used to chair, we have the Tribune Group, Progress and so Tom is bringing other people together.  He has a perfect right to do that.”“I welcome what Tom is doing, I welcome the discussions that are taking place across all those different groups.” ‘You’ve got to respect people’s views on this, they’ve got to listen to their own constituents’ – shadow chancellor John McDonnell doesn’t confirm Labour’s front bench will be whipped into backing a second referendum.For more Sunday politics: https://t.co/XxaMhMIGg7 pic.twitter.com/e6bcvyGeXn— Ridge on Sunday (@RidgeOnSunday) March 3, 2019Caroline Flint, MP for Don Valley, who would consider voting for Theresa May’s deal:Called for a “free vote on an improved deal so those MPs who want a second referendum can vote for that but those of us who want to keep our promises to our electorate can also keep faith with those people”.On another EU public vote:  “I think there are something like 60 or 70 Labour MPs who feel as strongly as I do against the second referendum”.On how many Labour MPs could vote for a deal: “I think if there was a free vote, a number, 10s, 20s, 30s, would vote for an improved offer”.On MPs quitting the party: “No, I won’t be tempted to do the same but let me say this, when people like Luciana Berger, Joan Ryan – a friend of mine and still a friend of mine, when Ian Austin left the Labour Party and actually Mike Gapes as well who I have known for many, many, many years – that was a week of sorrow”. ‘I urge my Labour colleagues to consider voting for an improved Brexit deal from Theresa May’ says Caroline Flint. #RidgeFollow Sunday politics live: https://t.co/XxaMhMIGg7 pic.twitter.com/frXHPrT7v6— Ridge on Sunday (@RidgeOnSunday) March 3, 2019The Andrew Marr ShowFormer Prime Minister Tony Blair:He didn’t know about The Independent Group members leaving before they quit, but: “I’m in touch with them… I’ve got a great deal of sympathy with what they’re doing and what they’re saying.”On whether he ‘backs’ the move: “I’m staying in the Labour Party… But do I sympathise with what they’ve done? Yes, I do. I think they’re courageous in having done it.”On why he’s staying: “In the end it’s a question of, is it possible to bring the Labour Party back? And I think… I hope it is. I’m not sure it is.” Rebecca Long-Bailey: “We’re not looking to overturn the result of the referendum” #Marr talks to Labour’s Shadow Business Secretary Rebecca Long-Bailey about the party’s position on #Brexit https://t.co/JSTLNoP1Am pic.twitter.com/XbmyP65xIY— BBC Politics (@BBCPolitics) March 3, 2019Pienaar’s PoliticsLord Charlie Falconer, who has been appointed by Labour to conduct a review into how antisemitism cases are handled:On taking up the new role: “If [Chris Williamson] hadn’t been suspended, I think it would have been impossible, so probably I wouldn’t, but he was suspended and that was a signal.”On Labour resignations: “There’s a lot of anxiety in the Lords over the leadership of the Labour Party, and there’s a lot of people, I expect, toying with whether they’re staying or not.”center_img Does the country want another referendum? #Marr talks to the former Labour prime minister Tony Blair about another #Brexit referendum https://t.co/kakizrGsLS pic.twitter.com/BykDY21qx0— BBC Politics (@BBCPolitics) March 3, 2019Labour frontbencher Rebecca Long-Bailey, who emphasised both continuing to push for Labour’s Brexit plan and a general election:On Brexit: “We’re consistently trying to push Labour’s deal… and we won’t stop doing that… We have to look at options such as putting her deal and a number of other options to the people.”On whether Labour respects the 2016 result: “We’re not looking to overturn the result of the referendum. Let’s be clear: what we’ve said is that to avoid a damaging or a no deal Brexit, we think that there should be an option on the table to put a deal and a number of other options to the people.”Asked whether ‘Remain’ would be on the ballot paper: “That may well be one of the options.” Tags:Tony Blair /Caroline Flint /Labour /John McDonnell /Rebecca Long-Bailey /Sunday shows /Lord Charlie Falconer /last_img read more

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Was Apollo 11 a Beginning or an End

first_img You’ve read your last free article Last Name Hope you enjoyed your free ride. To get back in the saddle, subscribe! Sign UpI agree to the terms and conditions. The plan seemed preposterous. John F. Kennedy was just 43 years old, and he’d been president of the United States for just four months—a rough four months. So far, his attempt to overthrow Fidel Castro had ended in quick and utter disaster at the Bay of Pigs, and the Soviet Union had beaten the U.S. to outer space, launching cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin into orbit and bringing him home onto the Russian steppe. Now here was Kennedy, on the afternoon of May 25, 1961, in front of a joint session of Congress, offering up what his national security adviser, McGeorge Bundy, had referred to as a “grandstand play.”“I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth,” Kennedy said.Congress greeted Kennedy’s cri de coeur with a smattering of applause. The president’s longtime speechwriter, Ted Sorensen, thought Kennedy sensed that “the audience was skeptical if not hostile.” A Gallup poll taken a week before the speech found that only 33 percent of Americans thought the nation should spend an estimated $40 billion to land a man on the moon. (The final bill ended up being $25 billion allocated over the course of a decade, about $180 billion in today’s dollars.)Fiscal conservatives fumed. “We’re going to go broke with this nonsense!” remarked the president’s own father, former Securities and Exchange Commission chairman Joseph Kennedy. Scientists thought Kennedy’s proposed time span was fanciful. The Austrian theoretical physicist Hans Thirring told U.S. News and World Report, “I am quite sure it will not be done within the next 10 years, and I think it very likely not to happen within the next 30 years or 40 years.” And social reformers would come to see the Apollo program as a drain on needed resources. Whitney Young, president of the National Urban League, noted that America could “lift every poor person in the country above the official poverty standard” for a fraction of the cost of putting two men on the moon.   But on July 16, 1969, five and a half months before the end of the decade, a million people packed the beaches and highways of the Atlantic coast of Central Florida to watch the launch of Apollo 11. That morning, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins had woken up long before dawn and eaten the traditional NASA pre-mission breakfast of steak and eggs. As 9:32 a.m. approached, the three astronauts were sitting in their cramped command module atop a 363-foot, three-stage Saturn V rocket, going through their final preparations before countdown. Television viewers in 33 different countries watched as the Saturn V’s five engines reached their maximum thrust of 7.6 million pounds, lurching the spaceship into the air. For the next four days, the world kept following the mission’s progress as the crew flew 230,000 miles, entered the moon’s orbit, and finally touched down on the dusty lunar surface. “Houston, Tranquility Base here,” Armstrong reported back to Earth. “The Eagle has landed.” Subscribe now, or to get 10 days of free access, sign up with your email. Cancel anytime. The State of Texas(Daily)A daily digest of Texas news, plus the latest from Texas Monthly Brinkley argues that Kennedy’s death ensured that the moon shot would have enough funding to meet its before-the-decade-is-out deadline. Delaying or canceling the program became politically untenable. “From 1964 to 1969,” Brinkley writes, “whenever Congress considered gutting the Apollo programs, [President] Johnson evoked the martyred JFK with don’t-you-dare political mastery.”Hundreds of spectators—many of whom had camped out the night before—wait for the launch of Apollo 11 at Kennedy Space Center on July 16, 1969.NASAWhen the Apollo 11 crew landed safely back on Earth, the idea that the mission was only the start of the Space Age was widely held. In just over a decade, NASA had built three different generations of spaceships, blasted humans into orbit, sent astronauts outside their vehicles to “walk” in the void of space, and finally orchestrated the dizzying spectacle of the moon landing. The Wright brothers’ flight at Kitty Hawk had spurred decades of innovations that had forever changed the nature of war, travel, and trade on planet Earth. The space program seemed to offer the possibility of similarly radical results. “I thought at the time it was the beginning of something,” says the former Mission Control technician Poppy Northcutt during the close of Chasing the Moon, director Robert Stone’s gorgeous, often bittersweet documentary on the space race, which premieres on PBS’s American Experience in early July. “I thought it was the beginning of moving out to other planets.” Instead, in January 1970, NASA announced it would be shrinking its workforce by 50,000 over the next eighteen months. The agency’s budget, which reached a high of 4.4 percent of federal spending in 1966, dipped under 1 percent by 1975 and is now half a percent of the total. Over the past three decades, presidents George H. W. Bush, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama have all announced bold goals for human space exploration, with planned return trips to the moon, landings on asteroids, and voyages to Mars. None of these ambitions have come anywhere close to being realized. This past March, Vice President Mike Pence declared that NASA would send astronauts back to the moon by the end of 2024 “by any means necessary.” Don’t bet on it. Since the retirement of the space shuttle, in 2011, the United States hasn’t even had the capacity to launch humans into orbit, much less embark on a far more difficult and costly moon mission. The pronouncements of private space moguls have been no more reliable. SpaceX founder Elon Musk said in 2017 that he would land humans on Mars and lay the foundation for a colony there in 2024, but the spaceship that would actually take those first settlers there is still a far-off concept. SpaceX was slated to begin ferrying astronauts to the International Space Station in 2015 as part of a NASA contract. It has yet to launch its first manned mission. Virgin Galactic, founded by the British billionaire Richard Branson, began selling $200,000 tickets to space in 2004. In the fifteen years since, the company has flown a grand total of zero customers, and four people have died during testing. In the epilogue of Shoot for the Moon, Donovan asserts, “A new spirit of space exploration is in the air,” but if there is a new spirit, it’s mostly wishful thinking. The astrophysicist and television host Neil deGrasse Tyson offers a more believable assessment of the state of manned space exploration in his 2012 book Space Chronicles. “Unless we have a reprise of the geopolitical circumstances that dislodged $200 billion for space travel from taxpayers’ wallets in the 1960s,” Tyson writes, “I will remain unconvinced that we will ever send Homo sapiens anywhere beyond low Earth orbit.” So was Eisenhower right? Was Apollo a stunt? Did all those billions give us the world’s greatest photo op—Neil, Buzz, and an American flag on the surface of the moon—a propaganda victory over the Russians, and nothing else? As a kickoff to a new Age of Exploration, Apollo was certainly a dud. No human being has left low Earth orbit since 1972, much less set foot on another celestial body.Apollo defenders point to scientific and technological discoveries to justify the program. As Brinkley writes in American Moonshot, Apollo “teed up the technology-based economy the United States enjoys today,” leading to innovations in everything from computing to lightweight materials and meteorological forecasting. But these were all spin-off technologies that could have been developed for far less than $180 billion. The key engineering feats that powered the moon mission, the Saturn V rocket, in particular, did not spur the creation of bigger and better successors. In Space Chronicles, Tyson notes that “unlike . . . the first airplane or the first desktop computer—artifacts that make us all chuckle when we see them today—the first rocket to the Moon, the Saturn V, elicits awe, even reverence.” The last of those rockets, lying inert at a few museums, including Houston’s Johnson Space Center, stand like Gothic cathedrals. We stare and wonder how a culture ever marshaled the time, resources, and expertise to create something so intricate and grand.Still, Apollo has had psychic benefits that are hard to quantify. It is now our most potent national myth. The word “moon shot” has come to signify a go-for-broke effort to do the impossible. The phrase “If we can put a man on the moon, then—” starts many sentences asserting that seemingly intractable problems may not, in fact, be so intractable. And, unlike the Manhattan Project, a grand American project that resulted in the prospect of nuclear annihilation, Apollo 11 was the realization of an ancient and benign dream.After returning from space, a number of astronauts have talked about how the experience shifted their perspective on Earth, a phenomenon called the overview effect. Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell famously said, “You develop an instant global consciousness, a people orientation, an intense dissatisfaction with the state of the world, and a compulsion to do something about it.” Editor’s Desk(Monthly)A message from the editors at Texas Monthly First Name Sign up for free accesscenter_img NASA, too, has developed something of a global consciousness. The agency may be best known today for its unmanned exploration of the solar system and the Hubble Space Telescope’s photographs of distant galaxies and black holes, but NASA also closely monitors the earth. It was a NASA scientist, James Hansen, who spurred global awareness of climate change with his dramatic 1988 testimony to Congress, and the agency’s Earth Science division has used a global network of satellites to track our planet’s changing atmospheric conditions. Even now, under the direct control of a White House that has sought to undermine climate science, the agency remains clear-eyed. NASA’s website documents the warming of Earth’s oceans, the shrinking of our ice sheets, and the growing prevalence of extreme weather events. The agency has no doubt about the cause: “most of it is extremely likely (greater than 95 percent probability) to be the result of human activity since the mid-20th century.”If the Apollo program’s great achievement was to demonstrate that with enough money, courage, and scientific know-how we can do what seems impossible, then perhaps its example can help us tackle the great challenge that NASA sees bearing down on our planet right now. This would, in fact, be in keeping with Apollo’s history.Toward the end of Chasing the Moon, Stone shows archival footage of the Apollo 11 crew’s worldwide goodwill tour. The astronauts have suddenly become international heroes, and everywhere they go, adoring throngs greet them. At press conferences, reporters ask Armstrong and Aldrin how it felt to be there. They often struggle with the answer, but in Stone’s film, we watch the habitually taciturn Armstrong respond to one such question with poetry.“As we looked up from the surface of the moon  we could see above us the planet Earth, and it was very small, but it was very beautiful,” Armstrong says to the crowd of foreign reporters. “And it looked like an oasis in the heavens. And we thought it was very important, at that point, for us and men everywhere to save that planet, as a beautiful oasis that we together can enjoy, for all the future.”  Enter your email address Never Miss a StorySign up for Texas Monthly’s State of Texas newsletter to get stories like this delivered to your inbox daily. Apollo 11 was immediately celebrated as a signal human achievement. Greeting Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins after they returned to Earth, President Richard Nixon said, “This is the greatest week in the history of the world since the Creation!” And in the decades since, the moon landing has only grown in reputation. NASA has called it humanity’s “single greatest technological achievement of all time,” and polling has shown a steady increase in the public’s belief that the space program was worth its high cost. Pop culture touchstones like The Right Stuff and Apollo 13 have celebrated the courage and resourcefulness of the original astronauts and the genius of the engineers and scientists who powered them into the heavens. Watch oversaturated 1960s footage of one of those mighty Saturn V rockets erupting off the ground and try not to swoon.   But as the moon landing’s fiftieth anniversary nears, new books and documentaries have arrived to remind us that our great American space epic was not, in fact, a frictionless succession of missions accomplished and ticker-tape parades. Even the most hagiographic offerings have moments that serve as correctives to our rose-tinted public memory. Shoot for the Moon: The Space Race and the Extraordinary Voyage of Apollo 11, by the Dallas writer James Donovan, is a largely familiar tale, a greatest-hits retelling of the Space Age from Sputnik to the moon landing. Donovan thrills at the celebrity of the Mercury Seven; mourns the deaths of Apollo 1 crew Gus Grissom, Ed White, and Roger Chaffee; and, in the book’s best section, delivers a bravura ticktock of Apollo 11, with the Mission Control pencil pushers watching anxiously through thick clouds of cigarette smoke as Armstrong, a flyboy with the composure of a Zen monk, improvises a landing on the lunar surface before offering the world his inscrutable “One small step for man” koan.But Shoot for the Moon isn’t all hero worship. Throughout the book, Donovan sprinkles in reminders that the public’s ambivalence about the quest to put astronauts on the moon continued long after Kennedy’s speech to Congress. Four years later, in 1965, Gallup found that only 39 percent of Americans thought the U.S. should do everything possible to beat the Soviet Union to the moon. Dwight Eisenhower had dismissed the need for a robust manned spaceflight program in the fifties, and he spent his post-presidency grumbling about the Apollo program, calling it “a mad effort to win a stunt race.” As Douglas Brinkley’s new history, American Moonshot: John F. Kennedy and the Great Space Race, makes clear, Eisenhower was far from alone.Brinkley, a Rice University professor, focuses on the birth of the moon shot, taking us back a century earlier to show its roots in fantasy. French novelist Jules Verne imagined, in 1865, that the first lunar mission would involve three American astronauts launched from Florida, and American rocket innovator Robert Goddard announced, in 1920, that he had received applications from nine men who wanted to ride one of his ships to the moon. But Brinkley also notes that making a serious attempt to reach the moon was far from inevitable.During the presidential campaign, Kennedy had hammered the Eisenhower administration for falling behind the Soviet Union in the space race, but in his early months in office, “Kennedy had adopted much the same cautious position toward space as his predecessor,” Brinkley writes. “Rather than focusing on headline-grabbing space launches, Kennedy was looking elsewhere for measurable accomplishment.”Even after issuing his moon shot challenge, the young president expressed doubts and offered inconsistent rationales for why it was worth it. In his famous 1962 speech at Rice University, Kennedy rallied a crowd of 40,000 by promising that “new hopes for knowledge and peace” would come from exploring the moon and beyond. Two months later, in a private conversation with NASA administrator James Webb, the president declared himself “not that interested in space” and said that “the only justification” for the Apollo program’s lavish expenditures was “to beat [the Soviets].” Then Kennedy seemed to waffle on the idea that the moon shot was a geopolitical competition. In September 1963 he proposed in a speech to the UN General Assembly that the U.S. and Soviet Union join together for a binational moon mission. When that proposal led nowhere, the president once more adopted a hawkish pose. On the afternoon of November 22, 1963, he was scheduled to discuss the Apollo program with the Dallas Citizens Council and tell them that “the United States of America has no intent of finishing second in space.” This Week in Texas(Weekly)The best stories from Texas Monthly Already a subscriber? Login or link your subscription. Subscribe Why am I seeing this? If you fill out the first name, last name, or agree to terms fields, you will NOT be added to the newsletter list. Leave them blank to get signed up.last_img read more

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ANDY Reid has already been in store to collect his

first_imgANDY Reid has already been in store to collect his very special ABF Charity Shirts – one for him and one for his DadAhead of this Friday’s match against Hull KR, when the Saints will don the kit, he was welcomed by Merchandise Manager Steve Law.The match will be a special day for Andy who lost both his legs and right arm in an IED attack in Afghanistan.He will lead the teams out and the game is in honour of a charity he holds closely to his heart – the Soldiers Charity.Tickets for the match are on sale now and you can buy by logging on to the Saints Superstore, calling in the Ticket Office at Langtree Park or by calling 01744 455 052.Sales of the stunning charity shirt are going well and details of how to order are here.last_img

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A YOUTHFUL Saints slipped to their fourth defeat i

first_imgA YOUTHFUL Saints slipped to their fourth defeat in a row as they lost 21-14 to London Broncos at the Twickenham Stoop.Missing ten first team players and losing Adam Swift in the first half they fought back from an eight point deficit to almost pull it off at the death.They led 10-6 at half time as Anthony Laffranchi and Adam Swift broke the tough Broncos defence.‘Boof’ took a short pass to put them ahead before Swift got his eighth in the Red V following great work from Nathan Ashe and Alex Walmsley.London got back in it with a great Chris Bailey score before a disjointed Saints galvanised and held out until half time.In the second half, Broncos hit Saints twice in 10 minutes only for Paul Wellens to round off a fine length of the field move involving Josh Jones and Mark Percival.But the boot of Michael Witt proved the difference as he added a penalty and drop goal late on to seal the win.Saints handed a debut to Luke Thompson on his 18th birthday and brought in Nathan Ashe to partner Lance Hohaia in the halves.Anthony Laffranchi was named in the second row with Sia Soliola.But they were still missing Francis Meli, Jon Wilkin and Ade Gardner through suspension, whilst James Roby, Jonny Lomax, Josh Perry, Willie Manu, Mark Flanagan, Anthony Walker and Gary Wheeler were unavailable through injury.Both sides started with strong sets until a knock on gave London good attacking position.The ball went to ground though and moments later both sides exchanged knock ons.The Broncos were laying the foundations and when Will Lovell made a great run, Tommy Lee and Craig Gower almost unlocked the defence.Tommy Makinson took a high ball and then a bullocking run from Tony Puletua had Nathan Ashe on his shoulder.On 17 minutes, Anthony Laffranchi plunged over, goaled by Mark Percival.And three minutes later Ashe broke through, Alex Walmsley took it up and fired a great ball out for Josh Jones to feed Adam Swift for his third of the season.Unfortunately, he was taken off on a stretcher as James Mendeika went in late and was placed on report.Chris Bailey replied to get London back into it before Saints’ Stuart Howarth went close.And the home side did well to dislodge the ball from Soliola as he came steaming in for a try late on.In the second half, Michael Robertson took advantage of poor discipline to forge ahead before Saints just about quelled a kick to the corner.Tommy Lee then took full advantage when Sarginson intercepted Lance Hohaia’s pass.Saints kept knocking at the door and got back into it when Josh Jones linked with Mark Percival to go the full length of the field and put Paul Wellens in.The visitors then had chances to make the comeback complete but lacked the final pass.And Witt duly hit a penalty and a drop goal to kill off their hopes.Match Summary:Broncos:Tries: Bailey, Robertson, LeeGoals: Witt (4 from 4)Drop: WittSaints:Tries: Laffranchi, Swift, WellensGoals: Percival (1 from 2), Makinson (0 from 1)Penalties:Broncos: 7Saints: 4HT: 10-6FT: 14-21REF: Tim RobyATT: Teams:Broncos:5. Michael Robertson; 3. Jamie O’Callaghan, 29. James Mendeika, 19. Dan Sarginson, 21. Kieran Dixon; 6. Michael Witt, 7. Craig Gower; 8. Antonio Kaufusi, 23. Tommy Lee, 18. Olsi Krasniqi, 22. Will Lovell, 12. Chris Bailey, 20. Matt Cook.Subs: 1. Luke Dorn, 10. Mark Bryant, 26. Ben Fisher, 27. Erjon Dollapi.Saints:21. Tom Makinson; 26. Adam Swift, 3. Jordan Turner, 19. Josh Jones, 30. Mark Percival; 23. Nathan Ashe, 6. Lance Hohaia; 11. Tony Puletua, 36. Stuart Howarth, 10. Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook, 4. Sia Soliola, 14. Anthony Laffranchi, 1. Paul Wellens.Subs: 16. Paul Clough, 25. Alex Walmsley, 33. Luke Thompson, 35. Lewis Charnock.last_img read more

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KYLE Amor and Travis Burns have both been banned f

first_imgKYLE Amor and Travis Burns have both been banned following incidents in the 21-14 win over Castleford on Friday.Travis was banned for one match as a result of a careless tackle on Justin Carney in the 23rd minute.Amor received a two-match ban for a ‘Grade C’ dangerous contact to the head, neck or spinal column of Jordan Tansey in the 60th minute.last_img

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NEIL Tucker has very kindly offered to raise funds

first_imgNEIL Tucker has very kindly offered to raise funds for the Steve Prescott Foundation (SPF) and Macmillan Cancer Support at a Coffee morning to be held on September 23 in the Red V Cafe bar from 10am to 1pm.Neil is 37-years-old and five years ago was diagnosed with stage 4 Hodgkin’s lymphoma.After five lots of treatment he was put in remission.He says: “The thing that kept me going was my odd conversation with Stevie. He always asked how I was and what stage of chemotherapy I was up to. He was the most considerate man I know. Then six months ago my cancer comeback, which thankfully now is in remission.“I’m sure Stevie was looking over me saying ‘Fight it, I did, you can.’ I’ve just done my first brave thing, the shave for MacMillan which involved shaving my hair, eyebrows and my beard clean off which raised £85. Stevie is my idol and will always be “Neil is organising the sale of homemade cakes and biscuits and hot and cold beverages. There will also be a tombola, prize raffles and lucky dips for the young children. The proceeds from the coffee morning will be shared between the two charities.The SPF wants to thank Neil for his kind and generous gesture to raise funds for his chosen charities and wishes Neil good luck with his coffee morning and hope it is a huge success. Please support Neil on September 23.last_img read more

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NC Chemours strike deal on toxic GenX

first_img The consent order also requires Chemours to give the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) access to confidential business information once the company and the state reach a confidentiality agreement. A lack of transparency and clarity on Chemours part as to what exactly the company is releasing into the Cape Fear has been one of the state’s major issues since the GenX crisis broke in early June.Bladen County Superior Court Judge Douglas Sasser made the decision at about 5:30, more than four hours after Friday’s hearing was set to begin. For much of the afternoon, Chemours and state attorneys remained locked in negotiations behind closed doors. A pair of Bladen County commissioners and county attorney Leslie Johnson sat in the courtroom while the closed door meeting took place.Friday’s hearing topped off a hectic week for Chemours, starting with N.C. Attorney General’s Office notifying the company Tuesday it was seeking an injunction on the behalf of DEQ, alleging Chemours had consistently mischaracterized its discharge.Related Article: Section of NC 210 near Elizabethtown to temporarily closeUnless Chemours stopped discharging the Nafion byproducts and remained committed to preventing GenX’s discharge, letters from the state said, Chemours wastewater discharge permit could be suspended.Read the full story.We have reached out to Chemours for a statement. ELIZABETHTOWN, NC (StarNews) — A Bladen County judge late Friday approved a partial consent order between Chemours and the state of North Carolina governing the release of GenX and other fluoridated compounds from the company’s Fayetteville Works site.The StarNews reports the order requires Chemours to stop any discharges of GenX, the toxic chemical that has been found in several Wilmington-area water systems, into the Cape Fear River — something the company says it has already done. Chemours also is required to halt any release of two compounds, called Nafion byproducts 1 and 2, in its wastewater stream. Scientists from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) told state regulators earlier this week that while the amounts of GenX and other “novel” substances in the river have dropped in recent weeks, estimated concentrations of the Nafion byproducts have not. Like GenX, utilities downstream from the Chemours plants are unable to filter out these compounds in their public drinking water supplies.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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WPD employees honored at pinning ceremony several promoted

first_img Officers from corporal to deputy chief also took part in a pinning ceremony honoring their promotions and growth within WPD.Chief Ralph Evangelous challenged the newly promoted to lead with a strong moral compass.“You must lead by example, let your conduct be an example for all others to follow,” Chief Evangelous. “You are the future of the Wilmington Police Department. Today I ask you to be strong leaders and operate on a strong moral conviction. Do the right thing for the right reason.”Related Article: Man injured in shooting near Greenfield LakeMore than a dozen officers were promoted. Wilmington Police employees were honored during a pinning ceremony on Nov. 15, 2017. (Photo: WWAY) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — Wilmington Police take time to honor one of their own and those who went above and beyond the call of duty.Two dozen employees were honored at Wilmington City Hall Wednesday.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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WANTED Suspect who set fire to Mallory Creek Clubhouse

first_imgSuspect accused of setting fire to Mallory Creek Clubhouse (Photo: Leland Police Dept.) LELAND, NC (WWAY) – The clubhouse at Mallory Creek Plantation is damaged after someone set fire to it.According to the Leland Police Department, the man in the surveillance photo entered the clubhouse on June 20.- Advertisement – Once he got inside, police believe the man then committed arson.A Mallory Creek resident told WWAY someone placed a roll of paper towels in the oven and then turned it on.Mallory Creek Clubhouse (Photo: WWAY)The Mallory Creek pool was closed until noon today because of the fire and investigation.At this time, the cost of repairs have not been determined.If you know anything, contact Det. Jonathan Berry at (910) 332-5003.last_img

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Wilmington business removes lice resistant to other products

first_imgLucky Lady Lice Removal has been treated lice-infested heads for 10 years.(Photo: Matt Bennett/WWAY) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — As school is back in session, a couple Wilmington women are crawling with business. And it might leave you scratching your head.No parent wants to get that dreaded call from the school nurse saying your child has lice. But if you do, Lucky Lady Lice Removal is here to help.- Advertisement – “When I got that call it was like ugh,” said Jacquelyn Taylor.This isn’t the first time Jacquelyn Taylor’s has dealt with lice in her daughter Savannah’s hair. She knows how difficult they can be to get rid of.“It’s frustrating, she had it once before when she was two,” said Taylor.After using over the counter products that seemed to work at first, she says the lice came back.“She just seems to every few weeks start scratching again, so here we are,” said Taylor.So Taylor turned to Facebook. That’s where she found Lucky Lady Lice Removal.Owner Rebecca Busch says many over the counter products don’t work anymore, and she has proof after submitting bugs from our area to a research project at the University of Massachusetts.“It was in the 90 percentile of bugs they received had a gene that was resistant to rid and nix,” said Busch.Rid and Nix are two popular products that claim to rid hair of lice. Busch, a self proclaimed nit-picker, claims to use a more natural and fool-proof method.“We use olive oil because lice can’t hold onto the oily hair, they slide off the hair shaft as you’re combing them out, plus it suffocates the bugs,” said Busch.Busch says there’s no one-time treatment solution, and that it’s a process.She also wants clients to understand the difference between what actually works, and what doesn’t.“We teach our clients how to do it so they’re empowered forever and always to be able to treat their own head lice cases,” said Busch.Busch says contrary to popular belief, getting lice doesn’t mean bad hygiene. Lice actually have an easier time in clean dry hair than they do oily hair.Besides Lucky Lady Lice Removal, there is also Wilmington Lice Center on Kerr Avenue and  Lice Clinics of America in Wilmington.last_img read more

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NCHSAA adjusts fall championship schedule after impact of Florence

first_img(Photo: nchsaa.org) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — As communities across much of North Carolina continue to clean up after Hurricane Florence, many people are wondering what will happen to the high school sports schedule.The North Carolina High School Athletic Association Board of Directors and Commissioner Que Tucker have decided to adjust the playoff calendar for fall sports.- Advertisement – “The complexity of adjusting dates for playoff rounds and state championships in fall sports are difficult even in the best of times; however, we must do everything in our power to do what is best for the students who participate in our programs across the state,” Tucker said in a news release. “Minimizing risk of injury while providing a wholesome athletic environment that supports and enriches the educational experience for our student-athletes must always be paramount in our decision making.”What’s still not clear is how the NCHSAA will handle the multiple games some teams missed. So far many teams have already missed two weeks of their schedule with a third coming this week. Brunswick County Schools announced yesterday the district will be closed another week through Oct. 5.Please see below a list of changes by sport:Women’s GolfReporting Deadline: October 10, 9 p.m. (changed from 3 p.m.)Regional Championships: October 15 (no change)State Championships: October 22-23 (no change)Cross CountryReporting Deadline: October 19, 9 p.m. (changed from 3 p.m.)Regional Championships: October 27 (no change)State Championships: November 3 (no change)Women’s TennisIndividual Regional Championships: October 19-20 (no change)Individual State Championships: October 26-27 (no change)Dual-Team reporting deadline: October 15 (no change)Dual-Team State Championships: November 3 (no change)VolleyballPrior to 11:59 p.m., October 20, teams affected by the hurricane are permitted to exceed the weekly limitation—maximum of five (5) matches per week; however, daily limitations remain unchangedSeeding: October 22 (changed from October 18)First Round: October 23Second Round: October 25Third Round: October 27Fourth Round: October 30Semifinals: November 1State Championship: November 3 (no change)Men’s SoccerSeeding: October 31 (changed from October 29)First Round: November 3Second Round: November 6Third Round: November 8Fourth Round: November 10Regionals: November 13State Championship: November 17 (no change)FootballLast Regular Season Play date:  November 9 (changed from November 2)Seeding: November 10 (changed from November 3)First Round: November 16Second Round: November 23Third Round: November 30Regionals: December 7State Championships: December 14-15 (changed from December 8)            (Sites to be determined)last_img read more

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NC State researchers to hold meeting to discuss GenX blood test results

first_imgCape Fear River (Photo: Hannah Patrick/WWAY) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — Researchers from North Carolina State University will present initial blood test results from the GenX exposure study at a public meeting Tuesday night.The researchers will discuss their findings for blood samples taken from over 300 New Hanover County residents who volunteered to participate in the study, and answer questions from participants and the general public.- Advertisement – The meeting will be held from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Cape Fear Community College Union Station, Room U-170.Little is known about how long GenX and related chemicals will remain in the environment, how they are stored in the body or their toxicity.According to a news release from  NCSU, the GenX exposure study aims to address these questions.Related Article: NC State students charged with stealing pieces of basketball courtIn November 2017, lead researcher Jane Hoppin and her team recruited New Hanover County residents who agreed to give blood, urine and tap water samples for analysis.Participants received their individual blood test results via the week of Oct. 29. Water test results were presented and discussed at a public meeting held in April 2018.Hoppin and NC State co-researcher Nadine Kotlarz will present the results. The meeting is hosted by Cape Fear River Watch.last_img read more

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911 call reveals stabbing victims desperate cry for help in double murder

first_imgAt the home on Ivey Stone Court, a woman was found dead. One man was transported to Brunswick Novant Hospital where he died a short time later.A third victim, a female, was transported to New Hanover Regional Medical Center and is being treated for her injuries.That third victim made a 911 call to dispatch. In an emotional call, the woman told the dispatcher what happened and named the suspect, Torrence Helms. She also gave a description of the suspect’s vehicle.Dispatch: “What’s going on?”Caller: “Me and my family were just stabbed. I woke up and he was stabbing my parents.”Dispatch: “Where were you stabbed at?”Caller: “Everywhere.”Investigators have not released the names of the victims yet.Neighbors woke up to a crime scene, but they didn’t realize that’s what it was at first.“We live in a retirement neighborhood, so when you see ambulance lights and stuff like that, it’s normal,” Birtton Pridgen said. “So I didn’t think anything about it. Then my children came up to me and said, ‘There are police at the door.’ I knew something was wrong then.”Pridgen and others say they are just shocked.“They are very quiet people,” Pridgen said. “Very nice. Very good people. They stay to themselves like everybody else does here. So the news I’m hearing now is heartbreaking. It’s heartbreaking. Especially in this community.”Helms is charged with two counts first degree murder, attempted murder, robbery with dangerous weapon, flee/elude arrest with motor vehicle, and resisting public officer.Helms is currently in the Brunswick County Jail.Helms was a wanted man. The Department of Public Safety lists him as an absconder, which means he has failed to report for probation.He was just convicted in October on several breaking and entering charges, including at the Calabash Seafood Hut, and sentenced to community service and probation.He was also convicted of breaking and entering in 2014. While deputies were on their way to the call, they encountered what they believed to be the suspect’s vehicle based on the information provided by the caller.At 4:45 a.m., deputies were in pursuit of the vehicle reaching speeds up to 105 miles per hour.The sheriff’s office says due to the nature of the incident and potential harm to the public, a deputy performed a PIT maneuver which resulted in the suspect crashing in a wooded area off of Ocean Isle Beach Road.Related Article: Manhunt underway following chase across county linesThe suspect ran from the vehicle and after a short foot chase, the suspect was taken into custody at approximately 5:00 a.m.The suspect, Torrence O’Neal Helms, 30, of Calabash was transported to New Hanover Regional Medical Center. 1 of 3 Area where suspect crashed during chase on January 9, 2018 (Photo: Kylie Jones/WWAY) Deputies investigate at a home on Ivey Stone Court after two people were murdere, one injured (Photo: Kylie Jones/WWAY) Torrence O’Neal Helms Jr. (Photo: Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office) BRUNSWICK COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — Two people were killed and another injured at a home on Ivey Stone Court in the Shallotte area early Wednesday morning.The Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office says just before 4:45 a.m. they were dispatched to the home in reference to a possible stabbing involving multiple people.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Dozens of dealers flocking to Wilmington to showcase antiques collectibles

first_imgWILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) – From American furniture, jewelry and clothing, to toys, silver and collectibles, more than 30 dealers from across the country will be participating in this weekend’s Wilmington Antique Show and Sale.Now in its 49th year, Teresa Lee is organizing this year’s event, presented by the NC Junior Sorosis and NC Sorosis organizations.- Advertisement – “We have dealers from five states as far away as Delaware and some local dealers,” Lee said. “This year, we have added some vintage dealers because it’s very popular.”Some of the other items you’ll be able to see fall into a wide range of categories including farmhouse, industrial, architectural, primitives and Mid-Century Modern.“I’ve had calls from all over North Carolina and Virginia just asking about the show could they bring things in that they’ve had for years that they don’t know the value and our dealers are wonderful about looking at something and giving you their opinion of something,” Lee said.Related Article: NHSO keep kids smiling this holiday seasonWilmington antique appraiser Bob Warren will also be present to offer appraisals for attendees.There will also be a silent auction.“Our dealers and members donate items and all the money from the silent auction will go to local scholarships,” Lee said.The event will be held Friday, Jan. 18 (10 AM – 5 PM), Saturday, Jan. 19 (10 AM – 5 PM), and Sunday, Jan. 20 (11 AM – 4 PM) inside the lobby area of the Wilson Center located at 703 N. Third Street in Wilmington. Admission is $10. Click here for tickets.last_img read more

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Southport Police searching for multiple people in relation to store thefts

first_img The police chief says all three are persons of interest related to several larcenies.Police released images Sunday of a man leaving what appears to be the local Wal-Mart. As of Sunday afternoon, police have identified the male person of interest.Related Article: Gunman on the loose in shooting of NFL draft pickOn Saturday, police also released images of two women leaving what appears to be the same Wal-Mart.Anyone with information is asked to call 910-457-7911 or provide a tip at www.cityofsouthport.com under the Police Department tab. Southport police are looking for several persons of interest related to local larcenies. (Chief Todd Coring/Facebook) SOUTHPORT, NC (WWAY) — The Southport Police Department is asking the public to be vigilant of individuals that may be related to several thefts at a local store.Southport Police Chief Todd Coring posted on social media asking anyone with information on the three individuals to contact the police department.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Life after Drew visits the Archbishop

first_imgThe Life after Drew campaign was created about 2 years ago when the Abela family lost their beloved son and brother, Drew. Kenneth and Sharon, Drew’s parents immediately volunteered to donate his organs and Drew helped save and improve the life of 7 people who were the recipients of his organs.After this momentous happening in their life, Kenneth and Sharon together with Kenneth’s sister, Claire, decided to transform their tragedy into something positive to help others who are waiting for a donor, and also to honour their beloved son, and nephew, Drew. And the Life after Drew campaign was brought to life. The Abela family combined forces with the Transplant Support Group (Malta) that has been active in Malta for over 20 years, and an awareness campaign was launched.His Grace, Monsignor Charles Jude Scicluna, Archbishop of Malta, and Monsignor Charles Cordina, Episcopal Vicar for Diaconia, welcomed the Transplant Support Group (Malta) team at the Curia where the scope of the Life after Drew campaign was discussed. Archbishop Scicluna showed his complete and whole-hearted support for the initiative and also expressed his admiration for the altruism of organ donation, the donors and their families. He also promised to explore ways in which organ donation can be encouraged through the Church.The Life after Drew campaign  as part of Transplant Support Group is inviting members of the public to join this initiative and make a statement of love: sign up as an organ donor – it doesn’t cost you anything but you could save more than one life – are you ready to be a #hero? Sign up on organdonation.gov.mt WhatsApp <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a>center_img SharePrintlast_img read more

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Notre Dame fire Pope Francis expresses closeness and assures prayers

first_imgId-dħaħen li mlew il-Katidral ta’ Notre Dame it-Tnejn filgħaxijaId-dħaħen li mlew il-Katidral ta’ Notre Dame it-Tnejn filgħaxija A message released on Monday night by the Vatican Press Office reads: “The Holy See has heard with shock and sadness the news of the terrible fire that devastated the Cathedral of Notre Dame, symbol of Christianity in France and in the world. We express our closeness to French Catholics and the people of Paris. We assure our prayers for the firemen and all those who are doing everything possible to deal with this dramatic situation”.In a tweet on Tuesday morning, Alessandro Gisotti, the interim Director of the Vatican Press Office, expressed Pope Francis’ closeness to the people of France. The Pope, he said, is praying for “all those who are striving to cope with this tragic situation.”Soon after the blaze started on Monday evening, Gisotti tweeted the Holy See’s “shock and sadness”, calling the Cathedral of Notre Dame “a symbol of Christianity in France and in the world”.What happened?Fire broke out in Paris’ 860-year-old Cathedral on Monday evening, tearing through its timbered roofing and causing its storied spire to collapse.The inferno raged for more than 12 hours before hundreds of firefighters were able to bring it under control. One firefighter was injured as he battled the flames.The blaze started in the area around the spire, where workmen had been carrying out extensive renovations to the roof and the spire’s wooden frame.The Paris prosecutor’s office has opened an investigation into the cause of the fire. Police sources told Reuters that they were working under the assumption that the fire was accidental.What was saved?Only the Gothic masterpiece’s outer walls, façade, and twin bell towers remain standing. Its famous pipe organ, dating back to the 1730s, also survived intact.Firefighters reportedly saved many of the treasures housed inside. Notre Dame’s Rector, Msgr. Patrick Chauvet, said the Crown of Thrones – which tradition holds was worn by Jesus during his Passion – and the tunic believed to have been worn by St. Louis, the 13th century king of France, were rescued from the flames.‘United in sorrow’Messages of solidarity and sorrow are pouring in from around the world.The Bishops of France said Notre Dame’s influence “extends beyond the capital” and that it would remain “a major symbol of the Catholic faith”. They also invited Catholics around the world to “be living stones of the Church,” especially as the faithful journey through Holy Week and look to the hope of Christ’s Resurrection.Cardinal Timothy Dolan, Archbishop of New York, said New Yorkers are united in sorrow with Parisians. “This Holy Week teaches us that, like Jesus, death brings life. Today’s dying, we trust, will bring rising,” he said on the steps of St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Manhattan.The spiritual leader of the Coptic Orthodox Church, Pope Tawadros II of Alexandria, said the fire was “a huge loss for all humanity,” calling the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris “one of the most important monuments in the world.”WhatsApp <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> SharePrintlast_img read more

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US seen reining in radicals to prevent war Iranian general says

first_img <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> SharePrint FILE PHOTO: A Iranian Revolutionary Guard boat is seen near the U.S. aircraft carrier USS George H. W. Bush in the Strait of Hormuz as U.S. Navy helicopters hover nearby on March 21, 2017. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed/File Photo/File PhotoFILE PHOTO: A Iranian Revolutionary Guard boat is seen near the U.S. aircraft carrier USS George H. W. Bush in the Strait of Hormuz as U.S. Navy helicopters hover nearby on March 21, 2017. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed/File Photo/File Photo Rational Americans and experienced U.S. commanders” are likely to rein in Washington’s “radical elements” and prevent a war with Iran, the country’s semi-official news agency Mehr reported on Saturday, quoting a senior military commander.“We believe rational Americans and their experienced commanders will not let their radical elements lead them into a situation from which it would be very difficult to get out, and that is why they will not enter a war,” Brigadier General Hassan Seifi, an assistant to Iran’s army chief, told Mehr.WhatsApplast_img read more

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Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation joins the Alliance for Affordable Internet

first_imgAdvertisement The Commonwealth Telecommunications Organization (CTO) has joined the Alliance for Affordable Internet (A4AI), a coalition of private sector, public sector, and civil society organizations dedicated to achieving affordable access to both mobile and fixed-line Internet in developing countries. The primary goal of A4AI is to facilitate the reaching of the UN Broadband Commission’s Broadband Target of entry-level broadband services priced at less than 5% of average monthly income. A4AI aims to achieve this goal by making recommendations on policy and regulatory best practices, producing country ratings, undertaking research, developing case studies and encouraging change through in-country engagements and intra-country dialogue.Formed in 1901, the CTO is the oldest and largest Commonwealth organization in the field of Information and Communication Technologies, with over 40 Commonwealth countries and more than 100 other stakeholders, including the private sector, as members. Broadband, particularly Mobile Broadband, is a key priority area of the CTO’s work, due to the potential it has to promote development. Today smart mobile devices and a multitude of digital applications facilitate education, business, governance and many other services.  By joining A4AI the CTO has demonstrated the importance it places on making these benefits universally available by minimizing the constraints such as access and affordability. The CTO’s membership network consisting of ICT policy makers, regulators and operators coupled with its operational activities in research, capacity building and awareness rising, perfectly compliment the work of A4AI.Soon after joining, the CTO was elected as one of the 12 members of the Advisory Council of A4AI, which is the key governing body of the Alliance. As one of four organizations representing Public Sector and Academia, the CTO will work with the rest of the members of the Advisory Council to provide oversight, strategic direction and high-level decision making for the Alliance. – Advertisement – Commenting on the occasion, Prof Tim Unwin, Secretary General of the CTO said “The CTO is delighted to become a member of A4AI and to be elected to its Advisory Council. I am certain that this relationship, whereby we will work collaboratively, drawing on the strengths of each other, will facilitate our members reaching universal Broadband coverage. It is also an opportunity for the CTO to contribute to the Global efforts in bringing Broadband to the marginalized people.”Adding her thoughts, Ms Sonia Jorge, Executive Director of the Alliance for Affordable Internet said “Persistently high Internet access costs in the developing world continue to act as a major barrier to social and economic development. By working with CTO and other Alliance members, we will advocate for policy and regulatory practices to drive these costs down and enable the next two billion to come online. We have no doubt that CTO will make a significant contribution to A4AI owing to their expertise, insight and energy.”last_img read more

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