Cynthia Nixon-Directed Steve Extends Off-Broadway

first_img Related Shows View Comments The world premiere of Mark Gerrard’s Steve will extend off-Broadway through January 3, 2016; the production had previously been set to shutter on December 27. Directed by Cynthia Nixon and starring Matt McGrath, Mario Cantone, Jerry Dixon, Malcolm Gets and more, the show is playing at the Romulus Linney Courtyard Theatre at the Pershing Square Signature Center.Steve follows Steven (McGrath), a failed Broadway chorus boy turned stay-at-home dad. As he celebrates his birthday, he faces fear and uncertainty. He worries that Stephen (Gets), his partner of 14 years, is cheating on him, his best friend is dying of cancer and he questions what he’s done with his life.The cast also includes Ashlie Atkinson and Francisco Pryor Garat.The New Group production officially opened on November 18. Steve Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 3, 2016last_img read more

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Seminars to Educate Business Advisors about Employee Ownership

first_imgSeminars to Educate Business Advisors about Employee OwnershipBurlington, Vermont (August 19, 2008) — The Vermont Employee Ownership Center (VEOC) will be holding seminars in three locations around the state designed to educate business advisors about the basics of employee ownership.Designed for attorneys, CPAs, bankers, trust officers, and other professional advisors, ESOPs & Succession Planning: A Technical Introduction to Employee Ownership for Business Advisors will give attendees the tools necessary to advise their clients about employee ownership as an option for their business succession plan.The seminars will be held at the following locations:” September 18th at the Doubletree Hotel in Burlington (8:00 am to 10:30 am)” October 7th at the Brattleboro Savings & Loan in Brattleboro (2:30 pm to 5:00 pm)” October 21st at the Inn at Willow Pond in Manchester (2:30 pm to 5:00 pm)The cost for attending is $40 ($25 for additional attendees from the same firm). Refreshments will be served. More information and online registration is available at www.veoc.org(link is external).The speaker is Stephen P. Magowan, of Steiker, Fischer, Edwards & Greenapple, P.C., a Philadelphia-based law firm with a national practice focusing principally on ESOPs and ESOP transactions, and of SES Advisors, Inc., a financial consulting firm that specializes in analyzing and finding financing for ESOP transactions.The Vermont Employee Ownership Center is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting and fostering employee ownership. The group’s goals are to broaden capital ownership, deepen employee participation, retain local ownership of businesses and the jobs they support, increase living standards for working families, and stabilize communities. VEOC works directly with owners interested in selling their business to their employees, employee groups interested in purchasing a business, and entrepreneurs who wish to start a company with broadly-shared ownership. For more information, visit www.veoc.org(link is external).________________________________________This project is funded by a grant from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). SBAs funding should not be construed as an endorsement of any products, opinions, or services. All SBA-funded projects are extended to the public on a nondiscriminatory basis. Reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities will be made if requested at least two weeks in advance. Contact Jon Crystal at 802-861-6611.last_img read more

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Saint Michael’s physicist receives $50,000 US Dept of Energy grant

first_imgAlain Brizard of Essex JunctionSaint Michael’s physicist receives $50,000 US Dept of Energy grant to support his research in plasma dynamicsAlain Brizard, associate professor of physics at Saint Michael’s College, has received a $50,000 research grant from the US Department of Energy, under the program Theoretical Research in Magnetic Fusion Energy Science, to support his research activities during his sabbatical leave from October 2008 to June 2009.The title of his project, “Nonlinear finite-Larmor-radius effects in reduced fluid models,” involves collaborations with physicists at Dartmouth College during the fall of 2008, as well with as the French laboratory CEA/Cadarache near Aix-en-Provence, where Brizard will spend part of his sabbatical leave from January to June 2009. Brizard’s work focuses on the derivation of nonlinear fluid equations suitable for the analysis of complex plasma dynamics by powerful computer simulations which he will carry out on computers at Dartmouth College.A member of the faculty of Saint Michael’s since 2000, Professor Brizard was a physicist in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and was with the physics department at the University of California, Berkeley, from 1994 until coming to Saint Michael’s. He earned his doctorate in astrophysical sciences from Princeton University in 1990.Dr. Brizard and his wife Dinah and their teen-aged son reside in Essex Junction.Saint Michael’s College, www.smcvt.edu(link is external), founded in 1904 by the Society of St. Edmund and headed by President John J. Neuhauser, is identified by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s Best 368 Colleges. A liberal arts, residential, Catholic college, Saint Michael’s is located just outside of Burlington, Vermont, one of America’s top college towns, and less than two hours from Montreal. As one of only 270 institutions nationwide with a prestigious Phi Beta Kappa chapter on campus, Saint Michael’s has 2,000 full-time undergraduate students, some 500 graduate students and 200 international students. In recent years Saint Michael’s students and professors have received Rhodes, Woodrow Wilson, Guggenheim, Fulbright, National Science Foundation and other grants, and Saint Michael’s professors have been named Vermont Professor of the Year in four of the last eight years. The college is currently listed as one of the nation’s Best Liberal Arts Colleges in the 2009 U.S. News & World Report rankings.-30-last_img read more

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On the wild side

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Do not trust adjusted company earnings, investors warned

first_imgAnalysing the 20 companies in the Swiss Market Index (SMI), the bank found that if these firms had been gradually writing down the value of goodwill, their net profits would have been 10% less than they actually been reported as being in 2013.But while the treatment of goodwill was transparent, the way adjusted profits were reported was out of control, it said in the paper.“Unlike the statutory profit figures, there are no set accounting rules governing the way adjusted earnings figures are reported,” it said, adding that this meant there were effectively no limits on how creative companies could be.Examples of items that could be included or excluded in the adjusted earnings figures were extraordinary income or expenses, extraordinary amortisation of tangible assets, foreign currency gains and losses and restructuring costs, it said.Data showed that 56% of EURO STOXX 50 companies had reported adjusted net profit in 2013 that was higher than the statutory equivalent, and for a further 20% there was no difference between the two types of reported profit.“This suggests that companies are also using the adjusted profits to conceal operating weaknesses or the negative aspects of an aggressive acquisition policy,” it said.These adjusted figures were then often pushed to the fore in press releases and presentations, it said.“Investors are therefore best advised to analyse not only the income statement but also the reported cash flow,” the paper went on.Since free cash flow could fluctuate widely from one year to the next, it made sense to assess it using cumulative figures over several years, the bank said. Investors should pay little attention to adjusted profit figures published by companies, as a large proportion of listed businesses seem to be using the method to make themselves look more profitable, according to Bank J. Safra Sarasin.In a paper on sustainable investment and governance in particular, the bank said that adjusted earnings figures were “tricky to compare”.“A better way to assess a company’s long-term performance is to look at the cumulative free cash flow figures reported over several years,” the paper said.It also said that because goodwill no longer had to be amortised on company balance sheets, starting in 2004, reported net profits had been higher since then.last_img read more

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UK regulator sets out three-year plan as budget doubles for auto-enrolment

first_imgThe Pensions Regulator (TPR) has set out its three-year plan and resource allowance until 2018 as the body plans a rapid jump in expenditure to cope with auto-enrolment.The UK body, generally funded through a levy on pension schemes, with state support for auto-enrolment, will spend £136.8m (€186m) on regulation in 2017-18 compared with just £62.6m the current year.However, while the regulator is set to increase expenditure down the line, it has reduced its planned expenditure for the coming 2015-16 year from £84.8m to £76m.The Brighton-based organisation also under-spent in the 2014-15 year, which ends this month, after making delays in staff recruitment due to “restructuring” last summer and over-estimating on provisions and contingencies for auto-enrolment. For 2015-16, the organisation will see its headcount increase from 452 to 499.However, the number currently being employed is significantly lower than its forecasts last year, which said it would employ 583 staff.Over the next year, the regulator said it would continue its focus on ensuring smaller companies complied with their auto-enrolment duties.However, it would also have a significant focus on revising its Defined Contribution (DC) Code.This is due to the regulator’s adapting to the Budget freedoms, which will see a shift in the way people access their pension savings at retirement, with compulsory annuitisation no longer applicable.It is also expecting to create the regulatory environment for the 75 basis point charge cap that will be in place for auto-enrolment default investment funds in trust-based DC schemes.TPR said it would also monitor the defined benefit (DB) to DC transfer market, which could see an increase in activity due to the Budget freedoms, and intervene where appropriate.Chief executive Lesley Titcomb said the organisation’s work would be dominated by the DC at-retirement market transformation, evolving scam models and risks within the DB market.“During a time of such significant change, it is important the regulator be seen as an authoritative, trusted voice within the pensions sector,” she said.“The corporate plan sets out how we will provide trustees, employers and advisers with the information they need to see these major changes through.“Where we take regulatory action, I want that to be transparent and for our actions to be understood.”TPR chairman Mark Boyle added: “It is vital we reach all our audiences, remain on top of market developments, anticipate future risks and work collaboratively with government departments and industry bodies to ensure the overall retirement system runs smoothly.”Over the next three years, the regulator will also implement its new DB Code of Funding that it created to implement a new statutory objective.The code was widely accepted among the UK industry and sees the implementation of a new, holistic, risk-based model of DB funding.In October last year, Boyle said TPR was working to create guidance for DB and DC trustees, and that it would assert its presence in the European regulatory agenda.last_img read more

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Golfer With Local Ties To Appear On Reality Show

first_imgO’Brien will appear on a Golf Channel reality show on Feb. 24. (Image: Facebook)Update (7:53 a.m.)The season premier of Big Break Florida is Monday night at 9:00 p.m.The show features 12 women competing on the golf course for cash and prizes that total more than $175,000. Some viewers in the area will be rooting for 23-year-old Kristi O’ Brien, of Fishers.She is married to Franklin County native Ben Moster. They met while both playing golf at IUPUI.O’Brien overcame a car crash in 2009 and is using the opportunity to appear on a reality show as a second chance.“As much as it was scary, it really helped me realize all the important things in life,” O’Brien explained.Original Story (2-13)A professional golfer with a local connection will appear in a Golf Channel reality show this month.Kristi O’ Brien is a contestant on Big Break Florida, featuring an all-woman cast looking to make it on the LPGA Tour.The 23-year-old golfer was the 2011 Indiana Player of the Year and high school standout in Fort Wayne.She was a student-athlete at IUPUI when she met 2006 Franklin County High School graduate Ben Moster. Both golfed for the college and are now married and residing in Fishers, IN. She goes by her maiden name for golf purposes.She is the daughter-in-law of Paul and Susan Moster, owners of Southeastern Insurance in Brookville.The professional golfer met husband and FCHS graduate Ben Moster in college. (Image: Facebook)“She deserves everything she gets, its not given to her,” said Susan Moster. “She actually has to work for everything. She puts in all the time and effort.”It is definitely deserved. O’Brien survived a terrible car crash in 2009 and is using the opportunity as a second chance.O’Brien is competing against 11 other women on the show for an opportunity to win more than $175,000 in cash and prizes, and a potential spot on the LPGA. The first episode airs Feb. 24.last_img read more

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Boca Raton man accused of steering urine tests to drug lab

first_imgPolice say a Florida man took more than $70,000 in kickbacks for steering urine tests to a drug-testing lab in Pennsylvania.Delray Beach police arrested 35-year-old Daniel Kaine of Boca Raton last week.Police landed an investigation into Kaine by Palm Beach County’s Sober Homes Task Force began after last year’s arrest of Jason Gadreault. Gadreault was arrested in March 2019 on nine counts of patient brokering and one count of conspiracy to commit patient brokering.According to a Delray Beach police report, Gadreault claimed that Genesis Diagnostics, a Langhorne, Pennsylvania-based clinical lab licensed in the state of Florida to operate and perform, among other things, toxicology and urinalysis testing, paid him for each urine specimen he referred to Genesis for testing.Police said Genesis gave treatment centers and sober homes a percentage of insurance payments for the tests.Records show that Gadreault wrote 12 checks payable to DMK Marketing, a licensed corporation registered to Kaine. The corporation dissolved in September 2019.Kaine faces six counts of aiding, abetting, advising or participating in patient brokering.last_img read more

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SB : After standout season, Syracuse looks to build on elite status to advance farther in 2013

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Jet lag couldn’t slow down Ashley Dimon’s mind. The return trip from Tempe, Ariz., gave the junior catcher ample time to think about her goals for next season.So at 8 a.m. the morning after that cross-country flight, Dimon met head coach Leigh Ross in her office to reveal her plan for 2013.Syracuse’s season-ending loss to No. 3 seed Arizona State was still fresh in Ross’ mind. But as she listened to the ideas of her future starting catcher, Ross realized the future of SU softball was secure.‘The best sign of a team after a season isn’t the awards and accolades,’ said Ross. ‘It’s that they never want to stop playing. It says a lot about the future makeup of this team that they don’t stop preparing, even a day after the season ends.’Next season can’t come soon enough for Dimon, but it won’t come at all for Ross’ seniors – the winningest class in program history.Even without those seniors, though, Syracuse (43-16) has plenty to build on for next season. In an early nonconference tournament, the team held its own against California, the eventual No. 1 team in the NCAA. The Orange garnered national attention when it played its first indoor games in the Carrier Dome more than a month later.All season long, Syracuse racked up noteworthy accomplishments. The Orange won 40 games for the second time in program history and earned its first at-large bid to the NCAA tournament.Once there, SU shut out the favored Sun Devils, the highest-ranked opponent it had ever beaten, on the strength of a superb pitching performance by Jenna Caira.Caira threw two no-hitters this season, but Ross said she saved her best work for ASU as she held the Sun Devils scoreless over seven innings. In the process, Caira only surrendered four hits to the NCAA’s second-ranked run scoring team.Ross said that 1-0 victory – and the outpouring of support that followed from ASU’s own fans – reaffirmed what she believed heading into 2012: SU could compete with any team in college softball, even the best.‘When you hear compliments from the away fans about how you play the game the right way,’ said Ross, ‘you know your program has made national strides.’As SU rose to national prominence, its players began to buy into the system. Before the team traveled to Tempe, first baseman Kelly Saco said players only recently began to view the postseason as an expectation and not a reward.‘Anything less would’ve been a disappointment,’ said Saco when she learned of her team’s tournament berth. ‘We entered this season with the postseason in mind, we focused and we made it.’This season, Ross put together a schedule built to push SU into the national spotlight. The Orange came into the season as the two-time champions of the Big East, but had never reached the Super Regional round of the NCAA tournament in its previous two automatic berths under Ross.SU was challenged with early high-profile matchups, but it failed those tests. Ross said her veteran team found ways to lose games they should’ve won against Arizona, UCLA and California.The losses had a silver lining, though. Down one run in the seventh inning against Virginia in the next tournament, Ross noticed a shift in the body language of her players. She said they held themselves ‘with more confidence’ and refused to lose to a team they knew they should beat.With its newfound confidence, SU mounted a season-defining comeback. Catcher Lacey Kohl hit a double off the top of the centerfield wall, and pinch runner Veronica Grant scored when second baseman Stephanie Watts singled her home.In the eighth inning, outfielder Lisaira Daniels and first baseman Jasmine Watson hit a pair of RBIs and Syracuse emerged with a much-needed win. That win sparked later tournament victories over Michigan and Baylor, two ranked teams.‘We finally put it all together,’ said Daniels before SU traveled to Tempe, ‘and proved we beat good teams. It was definitely a turning point in the season for us.’Ross’ plan worked. Less than midway through its season, SU was already confident playing against the nation’s best. Those teams would be potential NCAA tournament opponents.Even though SU was eliminated from the regional round Sunday, it will try to repeat that formula with next year’s team. And unlike the group of graduating softball seniors, the returning players have known nothing but winning.The current SU juniors have reached the postseason in each of their three years. And with players like Dimon already game-planning for 2013, Ross expects another NCAA berth.‘It’s amazing to see where we’ve come from,’ Ross said, ‘But we’re not done working yet. We know we’re good enough to reach the College World Series, and when next season starts, that’ll be our goal again.’nctoney@syr.edu Commentscenter_img Published on May 23, 2012 at 12:00 pm Contact Nick: nctoney@syr.edu | @nicktoneytweetslast_img read more

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Petition calls for Rossier to act after racist comment

first_imgDoctoral student Gina Loring created the petition after students made racially-charged comments in a class offered by the Rossier School. (Daily Trojan file photo)A doctoral student at the Rossier School of Education created a petition that has garnered over 600 signatures as of Sunday asking the School to implement accountability practices after a classroom incident she described as racially-charged and offensive last month.“‘Women of color should be ‘sterilized.’ — This profoundly racist statement was made in one of my classes and the instructor accommodated it, so I created a petition to generate accountability,” the petition written by student Gina Loring read.Loring, who is a woman of color, said that while discussing ways to increase the number of women of color who receive prenatal care during an in-class assignment, some students suggested sterilizing women of color and taking their babies at birth would alleviate the issue.“Imagine if the prompt had said, ‘How do we clean up the homeless problem in Los Angeles?’” Loring said. “And imagine if their suggestion had been, ‘We should round them up and shoot them because that would get rid of the homeless problem.’” Loring said she was stunned by the comments. She cited the history of eugenic sterilization and the current separations of immigrant families as reasons for her bewilderment. After the comments were written and quickly deleted, Loring said she told her professor Kim Hirabayashi, who assured her the comments would be addressed. According to Loring, the professor addressed the comments by encouraging a brief in-class conversation. “[The professor] then proceeded to open class with a vague statement about the incident, at no point addressing the comments directly,” the petition read. “The incident was thus not only left without resolution, it was magnified.”Another student of color in the class said learning has been impacted because the majority of students in the “Challenges in Urban Education: Learning” class are people of color. Loring said six students reached out to her expressing discomfort with how the incident was handled, but did not feel comfortable speaking about it publicly.Hirabayashi told the Daily Trojan in an email that she would not comment until a resolution has been finalized within the school.Rossier Dean Karen Symms Gallagher said the school is aware of Loring’s petition and is currently reviewing the matter. “Our goal is to find an inclusive resolution that reflects both our commitment to an open exchange of ideas and our mission to teach students to value and respect the cultural history and the identities of those around them,” Gallagher wrote to the Daily Trojan. In the weeks following the incident, Loring filed a Title IX incident report and dropped the course from her record with a full refund, but said Rossier has not communicated with her since then.Loring said she chose to attend USC, and specifically pursue a degree at the Rossier School because of its progressive mission statement, and said that she does not believe this situation reflects those values.  Loring’s petition asks Rossier to publicly acknowledge the incident and implement workshops about critical race theory for Hirabayashi and the students involved. Loring and one of her classmates said they do not believe the students who made the comments are suited for the program. “I don’t see how USC could, in good conscience, send students out into the world with a doctorate degree in educational leadership who hold these kinds of beliefs or even would have these thoughts in the first place,” Loring said.Loring said she viewed the incident as a microcosm of issues surrounding gender and race that persist in United States today. “We know from history that when unethical statements and unethical actions are left unchecked time and time again, it becomes worse and worse with time,” Loring said. “You end up with horrific things happening because the masses were quiet.”Editor’s note: A correction was made to Loring’s quote “Imagine if the cops had said, ‘How do we clean up the homeless problem in Los Angeles?’” It has been updated to correctly reflect Loring’s statement.last_img read more

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