Road projects coming along smoothly-Rayburn Blackmoore

first_img Share 86 Views   one comment Sharing is caring! Tweet Sharecenter_img Share LocalNews Road projects coming along smoothly-Rayburn Blackmoore by: – June 27, 2011 Public Works Minister Rayburn Blackmore. Photo credit: GIS NewsPublic Works Minister Rayburn Blackmoore says installation of the railings and the placement of concrete on the new Roseau Bridge are among areas to be completed.He says all other components have been completed, paving the way for a much more improved network from Roseau to Portsmouth.Blackmoore was speaking with the media Friday to observe the progress of the works from the new Hanover Street – Elliot Avenue Bridge and then onto the Woodbridge Bay to the Cove Section of the project.The Roseau Bridge is a major component of the West Coast Road Rehabilitation Project funded by the Chinese Government.Meantime Blackmoore says the Woodbridge Bay Bridge is also progressing smoothly.Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

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Webb sentenced to life imprisonment for murdering Barbadian man

first_imgLocalNews Webb sentenced to life imprisonment for murdering Barbadian man by: – July 20, 2012 Sherman Webb, leaving court laughing after he was found guilty on June 22, 2012.Sherman Webb of Kingshill who was found guilty of murdering a Barbadian national on June 22nd, 2012 has been sentenced to life imprisonment on Friday.Webb was found guilty of killing Corey Poleon between August 31, 2009 and March 18, 2010, in the heights of River Claire in Elmshall.He was arrested on March 18th, 2010 after he confessed to three police officers that he had killed and buried a friend in the heights of Elmshall, led the officers to the heights of River Claire in Elmshall to a blue wooden shack and a “shallow grave” where he buried the “friend” as he “had enough and needed to clear his mind”.During the trial he explained to the court that Poleon frightened during an occult ritual where he was seeking to get a “guardian spirit” for him.He said he noticed that Corey had lost control of his bowels and was looking at him with only “the white of his eyes”.Sherman WebbThis he said made him realize that either Poleon was dead or that he was fully possessed so “I picked up the cutlass which was next to my foot and while holding it by the blade I struck him twice with my left hand by his jaw. He remained standing and I used it to slightly jam him out of the circle. He backed out of the circle completely and starting speaking in Latin”.Justice Birnie Stephenson Brooks who sentenced Webb on Friday, described the act as “bizarre”. According to Justice Brooks, a psychiatric report indicates that Webb does not suffer from any mental disorder, while the social inquiry report states that he is a person who did a stint in the United States Army, keeps to himself, and describes himself as having “high self esteem”.He told his probation officer that he was previously accused of murder but he was later acquitted. Justice Brooks stated during her sentence that he is “not a ready candidate for rehabilitation”.“The aggravating circumstances vastly outweigh the mitigating circumstances,” she said before sentencing him.Webb turned and smiled to reporters in court when he heard the sentence.His attorney, Peter Alleyne told reporters that he was “not surprised with the sentence as the judge had to send a clear message”.On exiting the court smiling, Web had a few words for the media practitioners gathered to get a quick snap shot of him.“See you guys in appeals court,” he said.Dominica Vibes News Share Share Sharecenter_img 73 Views   2 comments Tweet Sharing is caring!last_img read more

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More Terms

first_imgA while back I talked about some sport terms. Today I’m going to list some other unique terminology associated with the sporting world. Basketball likes to number their players 1 – 5. One is the point guard. He is in charge of running the offense. Two is the shooting guard. Number three is the shooting forward. He is usually the lighter of the two forwards, moves better, and can score in a variety of ways. Four is the power forward, and he is the bigger body called on to rebound and score on the interior. That leaves five which is the center position normally reserved for the tallest player, and he often plays with his back to the basket. He is the enforcer on defense, the muscle under the basket, and the guy who can drop step to the basket to score. This is the normal offensive scheme, but today a lot of teams adapt these numbers to fit their personnel. If you play three guards, number three is your third guard and four and five are mainly forwards. If you employ a 1-2-2 setup, then one is the point guard, two and three are shooters, and four and five are power players. This gives you an idea on the numbering scheme in basketball.last_img read more

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Bulldogs Tracksters Dominate South Dearborn Invitational

first_imgThe Bulldogs traveled to South Dearborn for their 8 team Invitational and put forth and unbelievable performance.The boys won by almost 100 points, scoring 184 points to Franklin County’s 88 points. Oldenburg was 3rd with 61, S. Dearborn-47, Rising Sun-46, Lawrenceburg-28, Switzerland County-26 and South Ripley-16.The girls won by over 100 points scoring 189 points to Franklin County’s 77 points. Switzerland County was 3rd with 66, followed by S. Dearborn-63, Rising Sun and Oldenburg both with 30, Lawrenceburg-25 and South Ripley-14.Batesville claimed the championship medals is many events and Kevin Bedel and Kim Tidman were both awarded the MVP trophies for the field events. Kevin placed 1st in shot put throwing a personal best of 42’3″, 2nd in the discus with a personal best of 122’4″ and 4th in the high jump at 5’6″. Kim won both the high jump at 5’2″ and jumping a personal best in the long jump at 16’9″.Other medal winners for the night were:Peter Heil in both the 110m hurdles(15.92) and 300m hurdles(41.59), John Moody in the 400m dash(53.55), Clare Bruns in the 300m hurdles(50.39), Kelsey Gausman in the 800m run(2:32.65), Mary Poltrack in the 3200m run(12:05.24), Jessica Wagers in pole vault (7’6″), the 4 x 800m relay of Mary Poltrack, Maria Wessel, Sarah Poltrack and Kelsey Gausman(10:37), 4 x 100m relays of Jacob Koehne, Michael Tunny, Garrett Yorn, Tanner Ayette(44.34) and Clare Bruns, Madeleine Robben, Mary Elizabeth Elkins and Sophie Meadows(53.11), 4 x 400m relays of Garrett Yorn, John Moody, Jacob Koehne, Michael Tunny(3:33.4) and Kelsey Gausman, Madeleine Robben, Mary Elizabeth Elkins and Haley Harmeyer(4:21.7).Runner up finishers and earning 8 points for the team were:Peter Heil-long jump, Robert Strobel-pole vault, Kevin Bedel-discus, Garrett Wagner-300m hurdles, Connor Bell-800m run, Michael Tunny-200m dash, Caleb Moster-3200m run, Clare Bruns-100m hurdles, Kelsey Gausman-1600m run, Audrey Hall-400m dash, Sarah Poltrack-800m run, Madeleine Robben-200m dash, Samantha Heidlage-discus, Lexi Hatcher-pole vault and the boys 4 x 800m relay of Caleb Moster, Cole Nuhring, Garrett Yorn and Connor Bell.3rd place and scoring 6 points were:Garrett Wagner-110m hurdles, Tanner Ayette-100m dash and 200m dash, Caleb Moster-1600m run, Luke Forbeck-discus, Tim Tunny-high jump, Haley Harmeyer-100m dash, Maddie Pierson- 400m dash, Maria Wessel-3200m run, Mary Elizabeth Elkins-long jump4th place and scoring 4 points were:Jacob Koehne-100m dash, Alex Jorgensen-400m dash, Cole Nuhring-800m run, Kevin Bedel-high jump, Nathan Bedel-pole vault, Sarah Poltrack-1600m run, Mary Elizabeth Elkins-200m dash, Lauren Eckstein-3200m run, Samantha Heidlage-shot put.5th place finishers with 2 points:Grant Meyers and Emma Gausman in the 1600m run.Finishing out the scoring in 6th place were:Garrett Yorn-long jump, Neal Nobbe and Avni Patel-shot put.As mentioned above…MANY personal bests were performed tonight, even in the cold weather. They are listed by event below…300m hurdles: Garrett Wagner and Clare Bruns.400 m dash-Alex Jorgensen.800m run-Sarah Poltrack.1600m run-Caleb Moster, Grant Meyers, Calvin Lehman, Emma Gausman.3200m run-Caleb Moster, Mary Poltrack, Maria Wessel, Lauren Eckstein.Long Jump-Peter Heil, Garrett Yorn, Kim Tidman, Mary Elizabeth Elkins.Shot Put-Kevin Bedel, Avni Patel.Discus-Kevin Bedel, Luke Forbeck.4 x 100 relay-Jacob Koehne, Michael Tunny, Garrett Yorn and Tanner Ayette.4 x 800 relay-Caleb Moster, Cole Nuhring, Garrett Yorn, Connor Bell.4 x 400 relay-Garrett Yorn, John Moody, Jacob Koehne, Michael Tunny and the 400 splits of Garrett Yorn and Jacob Koehne.The Bulldogs compete again at home next Tuesday against Rising Sun, Hauser and North Decatur.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Lisa Gausman.last_img read more

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Messer honors local 8th graders

first_imgAll PHOTOS of the event are available HERE. Batesville Middle SchoolEmily Meyer, photo #2 Emily MeyerJason Emsweller, photo #2 Jason EmswellerSt. Louis SchoolOlivia Raab, photo #2 Olivia Raab*Benjamin MosterJac-Cen-Del Jr/Sr High SchoolCloey Simon, photo #2 Cloey Simon*Ryan WilsonMilan Middle SchoolKarly Bushhorn, photo #2 Karly BushhornCaleb Prozanski, photo #2 Caleb ProzanskiSouth Ripley Junior High SchoolLanie Nicholson, photo #2 Lanie Nicholson*Clinton PatrickFranklin County Middle SchoolMacie Fohl, photo #2 Macie FohlJeremy Wilson, photo #2 Jeremy Wilson*denotes student did not attend ceremony Batesville, In. — Indiana Republican Congressman Luke Messer honored 8th-grade students from the 6th Congressional District this week for their outstanding academic achievements.Messer presented top students from each middle school in the 6th District with the 8th Grade Scholar Award at a ceremony in the Batesville Middle School this week. Students were nominated by teachers at each school to receive the recognition.“These students are some of the best and brightest young minds in Indiana, and they should be very proud of their accomplishments,” Messer said. “I hope this recognition encourages these future Hoosier leaders to keep working hard, dream big and make a difference in the world.”Messer delivered the keynote address to the students and their families. Batesville Community Schools Superintendent Paul Ketcham, Vice President of Human Resources at the Batesville Casket Company Mari Jo Moody, and Senior Vice President of Workforce Alignment at Ivy Tech Chris Lowery also spoke during the ceremony.“Indiana is fortunate to have such bright, hard-working, and dedicated students,” Lowery said. “As we contemplate the future of our state, I am convinced we will be in good hands as these young people innovate, build, and lead all of us on the pathways to prosperity.”The 8th Grade Scholars Dinner was sponsored by Hillenbrand and Ivy Tech Community College and took place at Batesville High School.The following students from each middle school received the 8th Grade Scholar Award. INDIVIDUAL photos of each student who attended the ceremony can be downloaded by clicking on the student’s name.last_img read more

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13 states now represented by Sprint Nationals entries

first_imgEAGLE, Neb. – The nearly 120 drivers pre-registered for the Aug. 31-Sept. 3 IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Nationals made the trip to Eagle Raceway from coast to coast and border to border.Thirteen states are represented by early entries for the fifth annual IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Car event. Sunday’s feature pays $2,500 to win and a minimum $1,250 to start, with a generous num­ber of contingencies to be awarded as well.The starting field of 27 will be determined through qualifying on Sept. 1 and 2 and in last-chance qualifying on Sept. 3. Friday and Saturday qualify­ing features both pay $700 to win while Satur­day’s Jake Ita Memo­rial pays $1,000 to win and a minimum of $100 to start.Gene Ackland, Martell; Brandon Allen, St. Peter, Minn.; Bruce Allen, Mankato, Minn.; Justin Allen, Gaylord, Minn.; Brandon Anderson, Montgomery, Texas; Shayle Bade, Lincoln; Dusty Ballenger, Harrisburg, S.D.; Ethan Barrow, Bloomington, Ind.; Brett Becker, Odessa, Texas; Jason Becker, Seward; Tom Belsky, North Platte; Clint Benson, Papillion; Nate Berry, McCook; and Greg Black, Des Moines, Iowa.Zach Blurton, Quinter, Kan.; Daren Bolac, Moyock, N.C.; Gregg Bolte, Fremont; Brandon Bosma, Round Lake, Minn.; Mike Boston, Lincoln; Johnny Brown, Orange, Texas; Nick Bryan, Lincoln; Jake Bubak, Arvada, Colo.; John Carney, Lubbock, Texas; Dwight Carter, Lincoln; Toby Chap­man, Panama; Dalyn Cody, Prior Lake, Minn.; Kyle Colwell, Knox, Pa.; Taylor Courtney, Fort Worth, Texas; and Luke Cranston, Holcomb, Kan.Blake Dacus, Fletcher, Okla.; Jason Danley, Lincoln; Joey Danley, Lincoln; Michael Day, Green­ville, Texas; Jack Dover, Springfield; Keith Dragoo, Greenwood; Tyler Drueke, Eagle; Ken Duke Jr., Selinsgrove, Pa.; Chris Ennis, Bakersfield, Calif.; Claud Estes, Godley, Texas; Colby Estes, Mansfield, Texas; D.J. Estes, Mansfield, Texas; Matt Etzelmiller, Keller, Texas; and Tony Ever­hart, El Cajon, Calif.Chad Fegley, Eagle; Monty Ferriera, Fresno, Calif.; Justin Fifield, Mesquite, Texas; Kyle Ganoe. Thompsontown, Pa.; Bill Garrow, Lincoln; Jimmy Grasso, Omaha; Trevor Grossenbacher, Lin­coln; Adam Gullion, Lincoln; Ryan Hall, Midlothian, Texas; Jaremi Hanson, Dillsburg, Pa.; Rick Hansen, Omaha; Jerald Harris, Harrisonburg, Va.; Bob Hildreth, Iowa Falls, Iowa; Brandon Hor­ton, Omaha; and Mike Houseman Jr., Des Moines, Iowa.Jacob Hughes, Hartford, S.D.; C.J. Hulsey, El Paso, Texas; J.D. Johnson, Wichita, Kan.; Kaleb Johnson, Sioux Falls, S.D.; Mike Johnston, Des Moines, Iowa; Mike Keeton, Glenallen, Va.; Chris Kelly, Moore, Okla.; Ryan King, Bennet; Chad Koch, Lakeside, Texas; Cody Ledger, Omaha; Ron Love, Lincoln; Doug Lovegrove, Waverly; Charlie McDonald, Jefferson, Texas; and Austin McLean, Loveland, Colo.Jesse Mack, Visalia, Calif.; Jason Martin, Lincoln; Scott Meisner, Fresno, Calif.; Justin Melton, Lewisville, Texas; Michelle Melton, Flower Mound, Texas; Jason Miller, Omaha; Mike Moore, Des Moines, Iowa; Josh Most, Red Oak, Iowa; Danny Nekolite, O’Neill; Neil Nickolite, Bellwood; Rod Ort, Lewisberry, Pa.; Blain Petersen, Essex, Iowa; Boyd Peterson, Ithaca; Ryan Price, Glenallen, Va.; and Shon Pointer, Grand Island.Kevin Ramey, Fort Worth, Texas; Matt Richards, Lincoln; Terry Richards, Denton; Steven Richard­son, Liberal, Kan.; John Ricketts, Burleson, Texas; Frank Rodgers, Lucas, Iowa; Chris Roseland, Carter Lake, Iowa; Dan Satriano, Papillion; Jeremy Schultz, Stewart, Minn.; Blake Scott, Pauls Valley, Okla.; Trevor Serbus, Olivia, Minn.; Troy Severin, Ashland, Va.; Andy Shouse, Ok­lahoma City, Okla.; Colin Smith, Sheldon, Iowa; and Stu Snyder, Waverly.Randy Sterling, Morrisdale, Pa.; Michael Stien, Ceylon, Minn.; Tyler Thompson, Des Moines, Iowa; Joel Thorpe, Urbandale, Iowa; George Tristao Jr., Tulare, Calif.; Robert Vetter, Wolfe City, Texas; Koby Walters, Liberal, Kan.; Charlie Ware, Hallieford, Va.; Mark Watkins, McConnellsburg, Pa.; John Webster, North Platte; Chase Weiler, Lincoln; Nate Weiler, LaVista; Jed Werner, Codell, Kan.; Ty Williams, Arcadia, Okla.; and Ben Woods, Newton, Iowa.Sprint Nationals begins with an open house and practice on Thursday, Aug. 31. The event will be broadcast by IMCATV and is presented by Precise Racing Prod­ucts and NMC Cat Rental Store.last_img read more

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IBB Club Installs Floodlights on Golf Course

first_imgAhmed, made the revelation during the club’s Annual General Meeting held over the weekend.He also said that his committee left the golf course better than it met it by reconstructing holes 12 and 16 tee boxes and completely rebuilding the carved-in ladies’ tee-box on hole 3.The erosion of the shoreline on holes 4,14 and 15 were awarded for repairs with concrete retaining walls with a view of preventing future occurrence.Q- Ahmed similarly disclosed that his committee dredged holes 9,13 and 15 free of charge, which prevented the course from being destroyed by floods running from Katampe and the military barracks, through the golf course.He observed that it used to cost IBB Club between N20million and N30million a year to dredge the course after government stopped giving it subvention.He added that his committee also improved the club’s account which was in the negative of N277 million last year and reduced the deficit to N13 million only.The former captain said the token course fee of N500 introduced on July 1, 2018 had been been encouraging and rewarding as on the average the club has been generating an average of N2.3 million per month over the period.“People have praised our efforts, for leaving the club better than we met it. There were limited parking spaces but my committee provided additional spaces. We were also able to build a car-washing bay, attached to the cart bay such that people can drop their cars and have it washed while playing golf. We hope the next Exco should generate some funds for the club from this facility,”Ahmed, who once served as the Competition Secretary said.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Olawale Ajimotokan and Omotayo Olaleye in AbujaThe past executive committee of IBB International Golf and Country Club, Abuja has installed floodlights on two holes on the golf course. The respective holes are number nine and 18.Former Captain IBB Club, Oseni Ahmed said that the floodlights on the holes will address the issue of darkness that makes it difficult for late starters to finish their play.last_img read more

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Graduate students launch charity campaign in China

first_imgThis summer, a team of international graduate students will be launching a charity campaign known as DanXingDao or OneWay, which hope to collaborate with companies and students across the world to raise funds to provide lunches for hungry children living in the undeveloped areas of mainland China.“I think it’s a simple and meaningful campaign,” said Yeming Chen, a MFA student in film production at the USC School of Cinematic Arts. “I think the effort we put into this will make something big and change the situation in China a little bit.”Weiyi Chen, Jiangyang Zhang, Xueqiao Ma, Yeming Chen and Yuchi Che work with OneWay to provide lunches for children in undeveloped areas of China. — Photo courtesy of Jiangyang ZhangIn order to effect this change, OneWay has utilized a number of social media giants, such as Facebook and the Chinese sites Weibo, Renren and WeChat. It invites interested parties to like its respective pages, then share pictures with the tag, “I’ve discovered China in the world.”In addition, participants can upload and email videos to OneWay describing their own philanthropic efforts. For every “like,” picture, or video that OneWay receives, its partner companies will donate money to Free Lunch for Children, one of the leading charity organizations in China.“We welcome everyone’s participation,” said Jiangyang Zhang, a Ph.D. student in electrical engineering at Viterbi School of Engineering. “The more Facebook likes, the more online participation we get, the more likely more companies are going to join and do the donations.”OneWay is also hosting Bike Across America, an odyssey that will span two months and 3800 miles from San Francisco to Washington, D.C. For each kilometer traveled, participating companies will donate five lunches.“We can do something meaningful for the children in China and in the meantime we can do the sports we love,” said Yuchi Che, a Ph.D. student in electrical engineering at Viterbi expressing her enthusiasm for the Bike Across America event. “We can combine these two together [and] that’s very exciting.”“After we came to the US, we were influenced by what we saw over here,” added Zhang, “A lot of people are doing these kinds of marathons to cover costs for supporting charities.”The team is composed fully of Chinese students, many of whom come from a variety of graduate programs at the university. Other universities are also represented, such as Chinese students from the University of British Columbia and the Pratt Institute.Though there are no specified positions in OneWay, each member works to contribute according to his or her own skills. As a group, they hope to expand awareness, not only amongst students of the same background, but also on an international level.“I think the most important part is is that all the people in the group want to do something about this,” said Xueqiao Ma, a M.A. student in Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. “They really want to help the students [in China]. They really want to tell the Chinese students overseas; we should do something for China – we should do something.”Zhang, one of the founders of OneWay, has volunteered as a teacher in impoverished areas, and he described his first-hand knowledge of the hardships that face the many children left in the shadow of China’s fast-growing economy.“In rural areas, a lot of children cannot have lunch because they live very far away from schools,” Zhang said. “They can only drink…water.”The OneWay campaign will officially be launched in May 2014 and will end September of the same year. During that time, the team hopes that it can catalyze a large number of people who are willing to get involved. The charity scene in China is still in its early stages, and potential partner companies need voices to rouse them.“The truth of the situation is it’s really, really hard to find companies who want to pay money,” said Ma. “We have one or two. We still need more. We still need more attention to tell people we’re doing this – we’re doing something good.”last_img read more

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Phil Wheddon seeks balance as head coach while trying to be the goalkeeper mentor he never had

first_img Published on October 18, 2017 at 11:07 pm Contact Bobby: rpmannin@syr.edu Before every game, Syracuse goalkeepers Courtney Brosnan and Lysianne Proulx face penalty kicks, services into the box, corner kicks and just about every other possible scenario they’ll see in the 90 minutes ahead. It’s not a time for coaching, it’s used to stay loose and relaxed. All the shots rocket off the foot of their head coach, dressed in full athletic gear, Phil Wheddon.Brosnan and Proulx both came to SU for Wheddon’s expertise as a renowned goalkeeper coach. This, Wheddon feels, creates a personal obligation, even “a lot of pressure,” for him to provide them personal attention, which comes in the form of private sessions, pregame kicks and specialized coaching for each goalie’s style.Wheddon’s challenge is that he serves as both Syracuse’s (7-6-2, 2-4-1 Atlantic Coast) head coach and goalkeeper coach. His passion and expertise lies in goalkeeping, but in addition to his two goalies, he oversees 21 additional players. He considers the balance often.“There’s what they call a ‘goalkeeping union,’” Wheddon said. “It’s more personal, you have a different interaction with them. It’s such a mental position. The psychological aspect of the position is so delicate that you have to be able to find that balance, and that’s the balance that I face.”At 9 years old, an ocean away in England, Wheddon became a goalkeeper himself at the whim of a physical education teacher who put him in net. He had fun, and he saw many notable goalies playing professionally, so “it was easy to aspire to be one of them.” Wheddon played professionally in England and the United States, though sometimes the position wasn’t as rewarding as he had imagined.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I didn’t have a mentor,” he said, “someone to teach me how to be a professional. I wasn’t really aware of how to take care of myself properly, how to do things the right way in preparation for the game. The goalkeeper can be a very lonely position. That was something I struggled with, as far the ridicule and things you often get as a youngster.”In pregame, he got “smashed” by his team’s forwards, trying to make a few saves and do what he had been told. It is, in part, a reason why he stresses to Proulx and Brosnan the importance of quality repetitions in controlled environments.Andy Mendes | Digital Design EditorWheddon didn’t turn to coaching until after he’d bounced around leagues for a couple years until 1993, the last year of his playing career. He aimed for a backup spot in goal behind Tony Meola on the New York Metrostars, now the Red Bulls of Major League Soccer. But Wheddon didn’t make the team, he said, because he simply wasn’t good enough.“At that point,” Wheddon said, “I had to make a decision. ‘Am I going to continue to play? Or do I need to actually make some money?’”At Crewe and Alsager College, where Wheddon graduated in 1989, he earned a minor in coaching. He knew nine different sports, from badminton to weightlifting. He decided to cash out, coach soccer and work toward his “A” license, the highest level of certification by United States of America Soccer.In 1999, six years after getting cut in New York, at the A license coaching clinic, he played too well. Peter Mellor, overseeing the clinic, had to ask Wheddon to make a mistake so he could complete the lesson he’d been trying to teach. Later that year, Wheddon had planned on going to San Diego to see the U.S. men’s national team train in Chula Vista, California, in advance of the 2000 Olympics. He wanted to see Tim Howard, Brad Friedel and Adin Brown work out. Then, on Christmas Eve, Mellor called Wheddon.“You can’t come to San Diego,” Mellor said.“What do you mean I can’t come?” Wheddon asked.Mellor quickly explained that Tony DiCicco had given up coaching the goalkeepers for women’s national team, which needed someone to fill the position for its trip to Australia for the Pacific Cup in a few weeks.With the women’s team, Wheddon found his passion in coaching and a “high” in being part of player’s successes. Wheddon worked with a host of elite goalkeepers, including Hope Solo. He later worked with the men’s team, becoming the only person to ever coach both the USA men’s and women’s World Cup teams.Wheddon studied different styles and approaches, and he saw the game shift from aggressive sliding to break-up plays toward standing and defending the net. The opportunity to observe this from so close allowed him to hone the coaching skills that exceeded his own while playing.“It was really finding what worked for one goalkeeper and finding what worked for the other goalkeeper in the same training session and treating them differently,” Wheddon said. “But I always learned a great deal from just watching and being around.”Andy Mendes | Digital Design EditorSeventeen years later, Wheddon’s office at Syracuse is a museum. Medals from various coaching endeavors rest under a glass table. He’s well over six feet tall, a commanding presence still athletic enough to practice with his players. A mini tea cup looks even smaller in his large hands. He didn’t have the speed to play wing, but he had the size to stop shots.Brosnan heard about Wheddon’s days with Team USA and the all-time greats he has trained.“His personality is just very commanding,” she said, “so I think that’s very important if you’re going to be a goalkeeper. You have to be commanding in your box and with your players, and I think as a coach that’s very important.”Sessions with Brosnan, Proulx or both are “high-intensity,” whether it’s preparation for opponents, crosses, service or anything else Wheddon feels needs to be improved upon.For Proulx, it meant making secondary saves. After she blocks an initial shot, he stressed foot angles and immediately staying composed to prepare herself for another shot.“I will block more than actually catch the ball,” Proulx said. “I play high off my line and if I can get the opportunity to get outside of my box and go to get the ball, I will do it.”Brosnan is almost the opposite. She’s focused on handling the ball and being technically sound. Her game is more geared toward setting with her feet and catching balls out of midair.To Wheddon, every goalkeeper is a unique challenge stylistically, but the success is in the fundamentals.“It all starts with body shape and what they call a set position,” he said. “How you’re going to stand when you’re preparing to face a shot. It all starts there. Your balance and your shape … nowadays you have to be as good with your feet as you are with your hands.”With that much attention to detail in his goalkeepers, Wheddon calls on his staff — Kelly Lawrence, Ben Boehner and Javier Mejia-Blau — to work with the rest of the roster when he needs time with his goalies.At the start of practice, while the other 21 players warms up, Wheddon kicks at the goalies for reps. Then, he rejoins the full team and, he said, “I become the team coach.”“He’s always talking to me and Lysianne,” Brosnan said, “about improving in what we can do to be better individually in our position. (That is) integrating that into the team and how that can help us.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Local success at Limerick Junction meet

first_imgHe sent out Kuramathi at Tipperary last evening and despite making his first ever racecourse appearance in the Irish Stallion Farms EBF Maiden flew home under Billy Lee to take the win.There’s racing today at Bellewstown and in Wexford.Day two of the July festival at Bellewstown is off at 5.10 while there’s a seven-race jumps card at Wexford, which begins at 5.50pm.last_img

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