End of labour dispute good news for high school athletes

first_imgNot only did the school strike/lockout affect classroom studies for students throughout the province, but also many extracurricular events including high school sports in BC.The late start has put a damper on the fall sport season — which includes sports as fieldhockey, boy’s soccer, volleyball and cross country running.Coaches are now playing catchup to try to get somewhat of a season in before zone playoffs and provincial tournaments happen in October and November.”BCSS (BC School Sports) has confirmed that the seasons will not change – no extension to fall season,” Mount Sentinel volleyball coach Joe Moreira said Tuesday. Moreira is doing his best to keep the Mount Sentinel Senior Girl’s Volleyball program afloat by hosting a tournament this weekend.”We have had four teams drop out so we are scrambling a bit,” Moreira explained. “Job action has taken a bit of a toll.”At L.V. Rogers High School, senior girl’s coach Jennifer Kidd hosted the first practice of the season Tuesday and will attend the Mount Sentinel tourney beginning Friday at Selkirk College in Castlegar.Meanwhile a few of the fieldhockey players have been staging informal games in Nelson to try to stay sharp for the upcoming season.The Kootenay Cross Country season begins October 1 in Kaslo.”We will continue to have races set up on Wednesdays at 4 p.m. and will try to fit in 3-4 races before the Zone Championship on October 22,” a cross country spokesperson said on the zone website.last_img read more

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Fort St. John included in WestJet’s fare reduction experiment

first_imgHowever, there is blackout day when normal fares will be in affect, and that’s running December 17 – January 7.The new fare pricing from Calgary to Fort St. John is $143.98, and Fort St. John to Calgary is running $131.38Vancouver to Fort St. John will run $121.93.- Advertisement -The listed prices are applicable to one-way fights.“I would like to thank WestJetters for working hard to keep costs low so we can reinforce this core attribute of our iconic brand. WestJet continues to look for ways to balance a commitment to low fares while delivering a strong return to our shareholders, “WestJet Executive Vice-President, Sales, Marketing and Guest Experience, Bob Cummings said in a written statement.At this point, however, it hasn’t been made clear what WestJet’s plan is once the experiment concludes.Advertisementlast_img read more

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Kerr backs Oluoch despite Sharks howler

first_imgBut, a mistake of their own saw them lose 2-1, Ivorian Ephraim Guikan wiping the blushes off his keeper’s face with a second half winner.And Kerr, who walked straight to the pitch at the half-time whistle seething with anger after the expensive error, seemed to have calmed down at full time with three points in the bag and backed his number one to retain his shirt for the next match.“I am glad Boniface conceded that goal because he’s better than that. It’s a mistake which he didn’t mean to commit. He will learn from that and get better. In the second half, he had a fantastic performance and made a good save to keep it 2-1,” the tactician said after the match.He followed that up on his official Twitter feed where he re-affirmed his faith in the shot-stopper, complete with a photo captioned ‘my number one’.The coach admitted to being frustrated with the performance of his team especially after Sharks had equalized via Oluoch’s howler, but he noted he had to rotate his team so as to build on his depth and give everyone an equal chance to perform.Gor Mahia players walking out of the pitch during half time during their Kenyan Premier League match against Kariobangi Sharks on February 25, 2018. Photo/RAYMOND MAKHAYA“I don’t know what’s going through the players’ minds. The trip from Equatorial Guinea two days to the game obviously didn’t help us much. In the first half we are cruising at 1-0 then all over sudden we want to do difficult things with the ball instead of keeping it simple,” lamented the coach.He also attributed some of the questionable performances to nerves with most of the players fielded on Sunday earning rare chances to start.“Credit to the guys and I hope they see now how my standards are and how their standards should be.” The coach added.Gor went second in the Kenyan Premier League standings after the nervy 2-1 win, sitting on nine points, one short of leaders Mathare United who have played a match more.The record 16-time league champions will have an opportunity to return to the summit on Wednesday when they play their match in hand against former champions Tusker FC at the Kenyatta Stadium in Machakos.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Gor Mahia head coach Dylan Kerr issuing instructions to his charges during their KPL match against Kariobangi Sharks at the Kenyatta Stadium in Machakos on February 25, 2018. Photo/RAYMOND MAKHAYANAIROBI, Kenya, Feb 26- Gor Mahia head coach Dylan Kerr says he still trusts goalkeeper Boniface Oluoch 100 percent despite his howler against Kariobangi Sharks at the Kenyatta Stadium in Machakos on Sunday.Sharks were in line for a valuable point and probably all three after Oluoch let a simple harmless freekick from Bolton Omwenga spill between his legs to tie the game 1-1 at the break.last_img read more

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Raiders profit from Gruden, Carr bickering

first_imgFor a couple of guys who are supposed to be in the process of “tanking” a season to secure the top spot the NFL draft, Jon Gruden and Derek Carr acted Sunday in a manner that suggested a 23-21 road win over the Arizona Cardinals was kind of a big deal.They acted that way during the game, when at least two disagreements went viral on Twitter. They acted that way after the game, when they were clearly happy and relieved to have snapped a five-game losing streak.For those who believe in the …last_img

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‘Keep believing in the new SA’

first_img24 October 2006There seems suddenly to be a rash of commentators predicting that the South African miracle is over. They point to what is undoubtedly going to be a bumpy succession when President Thabo Mbeki goes, citing anecdotal evidence of a worsening crime situation in recent months.My reply is that those who believed in South Africa a decade and more ago should not get cold feet now.When I became the first major investor in the new South Africa back in 1993 with the purchase of Argus Newspapers and the creation of Independent News and Media SA, I never thought it was going to be an easy ride.But I had fundamental faith in the country’s leaders, its people and their commitment to building a decent democratic system out of the ruins of apartheid. The doomsday artists predicted we would quit when the going got tough, but 13 years later we are still there, our investment has been an excellent one, and I have never regretted a moment of it.Thabo Mbeki’s successorI still regard South Africa as a modern-day miracle, thanks to the inspirational leadership of Nelson Mandela and the leadership and management skills of his successor, President Thabo Mbeki. Mbeki steps down in 2009 after 15 years as president and deputy president, and there is a great deal of debate about his successor and the direction he will take the country.The ruling ANC meets in December next year to select a new leader who, in the nature of things, would be expected to succeed to the presidency 18 months later. I have no doubt that South Africans will choose the right leader to oversee the next phase of their development when the time comes.Already a rigorous and healthy debate is taking place about the country’s future, and how to ensure that the excellent base built by the founding leaders for long-term political stability and sound macroeconomic management survives.Even without MandelaSouth Africa’s exemplary transition to democracy was called a miracle because few outside observers thought it would work. Expectations were low and, even when the pessimists were proved wrong, there was a tendency to say that South Africa was lucky because it had Nelson Mandela, implying that without him things would have been different.I love Nelson Mandela and would count myself among his greatest admirers, but he would be the first to do justice to all those others who made sacrifices for a just and democratic system. Mbeki’s government contains many highly talented and focused ministers: Trevor Manuel, for instance, has now been Finance Minister for 10 years and is regarded by his peers as one of the best in the world. He is not the only one.It is to take nothing away from Mandela’s stature as one of the towering figures of our age to say that, among South Africans, he is no anomaly. To the contrary, he is the quintessential South African. That is why it is always a mistake to sell South Africa short.The achievements of the past dozen or so years have been remarkable by any standard. As the UN Secretary General Kofi Annan has said, South Africa today, with its robust economy, stable democracy and commitment to the rule of law, points the way to the African continent and the world as a “beacon of tolerance and mutual respect”. This is not a miracle, but a testament to the calibre of the country and its leadership.Patience rewardedIt is important to remember how easy it would have been for the first post-apartheid government to throw macroeconomic sense to the wind in seeking to redress the imbalances left by apartheid.Instead, the collective wisdom of the African National Congress as it settled into office was that imbalances created over generations of white rule could not be fixed overnight and that the first order of business must be create the conditions for sustained economic growth – a tall order given the sclerotic state of the economy in 1994.Today, we are starting to see the payoff, with growth in the past year of more than 5%, a rapidly reducing budget deficit, a growing tax base, an emerging black middle class, a housing boom in areas such as Soweto and other former townships, and a steadily deepening social cohesion.Growing painsWith growth, however, comes growing pains. It has been clear over the past year that South Africa has outgrown its infrastructure and its supply of skills. Booming car sales have exacerbated traffic jams. Demand for electricity outpaces capacity. Infrastructural projects are running behind schedules, and government departments have often not been efficient enough to spend their allocated budgets. Service delivery has faltered in many areas. Immigration from the neighbouring (and poorer) African countries, plus a major drift off the land and into the cities, has swelled shanty towns despite the government’s priority on building houses.The rising economic tide has lifted many boats, but too many remain mired in poverty. Unemployment remains stubbornly at 25%, and is falling only very slowly. Poverty in the midst of conspicuous wealth incubates crime.Yet when South Africans put their minds to something, they usually succeed. Tourism, for instance, has been a great success: last year South Africa comfortably accommodated a record 7.5 million visitors, the vast majority of whom went home glad they came. Before 1994, the number was less than 1 million.The government is all too aware of its problems and is intensely focused on overcoming them. The new Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative, and associated US$60-billion (£32-billion) capital expenditure programme, is aimed at raising growth to 6% by 2010, and halving poverty and unemployment by 2014.I am a member of the President’s International Advisory Board, which includes figures from world business such as Ratan Tata, Jurgen Schremp, George Soros and Lakshmi Mittal, and to a man we are enthusiastic about what we see as a new and vibrant South Africa, which in turn has huge implications for the rest of Africa.South Africa’s HIV/Aids programme gets serious and uninformed criticism around the world, but from what I have observed the government is very serious about HIV/Aids. It is spending billions of dollars on prevention, care and antiretroviral drugs, more than any equivalent country.Leadership contestThere is no doubt that race to succeed President Mbeki has unnerved a number of observers, but the truth is that it is not so much a presidential succession battle as a leadership contest, not all that unlike in the United States or even Britain where both leaders, like Mbeki, are drawing towards the end of their periods in office.The members of the governing alliance are thrashing out their differences in public, via a free and energetic media, which is the democratic thing to do.Last week, Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi, one of the political giants of the past two decades and a man with immense influence among the Zulu population (the biggest in South Africa), eloquently outlined his support for the Constitution and the democratic process – a very important intervention at this particular time.To be sure, there is a fair amount of name-calling and challenging of democratic credentials. But who said democracy had to be polite?Ideological shift in the ANC?Are we about to witness an ideological shift in the ANC? I don’t think so. The only “ism” that reliably applies to the governing party is pragmatism – a principled pragmatism in pursuit of an ambitious agenda to redress poverty, unequal opportunity and the other legacies of the country’s history. That is unlikely to change whoever is chosen as the ANC’s presidential candidate next year.The agenda will remain the same – actually, it is in effect mandated by the Constitution – and so will the realities that constrain the options for implementing it. One of the strengths of South African society, and one of the great sources of its stability, is a political culture of consultation and consensus, time-consuming though it often is. This remains an important feature of the ANC ethos.To call South Africa an “unqualified miracle” is to assert that the people who were responsible for what was called a miracle have somehow changed or gone away. Last time I looked, South Africans were still South Africans and still very much there. And it would still be wrong to underestimate them.Sir Anthony O’Reilly is chief executive of Independent News & Media. This article was first published in the London Independent and is reproduced here with the kind permission of the author.last_img read more

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SA doctors perform world’s first successful penis transplant

first_img16 March 2015In a ground-breaking operation, a team of pioneering surgeons from Stellenbosch University (SU) and Tygerberg Hospital performed the first successful penile transplant in the world.The marathon nine-hour operation, led by Prof Andre van der Merwe, head of SU’s Division of Urology, was performed on 11 December 2014 at Tygerberg Hospital in Bellville, Cape Town. This is the second time that this type of procedure was attempted, but the first time in history that a successful long-term result was achieved. WATCH: Prof Andre van der Merwe announces that surgeons at Stellenbosch University performed the first successful penis transplant in the world. This procedure could eventually also be extended to men who have lost their penises from penile cancer or as a last-resort treatment for severe erectile dysfunction due to medication side effects. As part of the study, nine more patients will receive penile transplants.Medical progress“South Africa remains at the forefront of medical progress,” says Prof Jimmy Volmink, Dean of Stellenbosch University’s Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS).“This procedure is another excellent example of how medical research, technical know- how and patient-centred care can be combined in the quest to relieve human suffering. It shows what can be achieved through effective partnerships between academic institutions and government health services.”Van der Merwe was assisted by Prof Frank Graewe, head of the Division of Plastic Reconstructive Surgery at SU FMHS, Prof Rafique Moosa, head of the FMHS Department of Medicine, transplant coordinators, anaesthetists, theatre nurses, a psychologist, an ethicist and other support staff.The patient, whose identity is being protected for ethical reasons, has made a full recovery and has regained all function in the newly transplanted organ.‘Rapid recovery’“Our goal was that he would be fully functional at two years and we are very surprised by his rapid recovery,” says Van der Merwe. The end result of the transplant was the restoration of all the patient’s urinary and reproductive functions.“It’s a massive breakthrough. We’ve proved that it can be done – we can give someone an organ that is just as good as the one that he had,” says Graewe. “It was a privilege to be part of this first successful penis transplant in the world.”“Western Cape Government Health (WCGH) is very proud to be part of this ground- breaking scientific achievement,” says Dr Beth Engelbrecht, head of the WCGH. “We are proud of the medical team, who also form part of our own staff compliment at Tygerberg Hospital.“It is good to know that a young man’s life has been significantly changed with this very complex surgical feat. From experience we know that penile dysfunction and disfigurement has a major adverse psychological effect on people.”Pilot projectThe procedure was part of a pilot study to develop a penile transplant procedure that could be performed in a typical South African hospital theatre setting.“There is a greater need in South Africa for this type of procedure than elsewhere in the world, as many young men lose their penises every year due to complications from traditional circumcision,” explains Van der Merwe.Three years ago the 21-year-old recipient’s penis had to be amputated in order to save his life when he developed severe complications after a traditional circumcision. Although there are no formal records on the number of penile amputations per year due to traditional circumcision, one study reported up to 55 cases in the Eastern Cape alone, and experts estimate as many as 250 amputations per year across the country.Heroes“This is a very serious situation. For a young man of 18 or 19 years the loss of his penis can be deeply traumatic. He doesn’t necessarily have the psychological capability to process this. There are even reports of suicide among these young men,” says Van der Merwe.“The heroes in all of this for me are the donor, and his family. They saved the lives of many people because they donated the heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, skin, corneas, and then the penis,” says Van der Merwe. Finding a donor organ was one of the major challenges of the study.The planning and preparation for the study started in 2010. After extensive research Van der Merwe and his surgical team decided to employ some parts of the model and techniques developed for the first facial transplant.“We used the same type of microscopic surgery to connect small blood vessels and nerves, and the psychological evaluation of patients was also similar. The procedure has to be sustainable and has to work in our environment at Tygerberg,” says Van der Merwe. Source: University of Stellenboschlast_img read more

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A New Strategy for Drought-Stressed Cities

first_imgGraywater Systems Multiple usesIn drought-stricken regions, households and businesses have already started to reuse graywater, and some builders are installing dual plumbing systems in new developments to supply treated graywater for toilet flushing and possibly other nonpotable uses, such as watering gardens. Rather than being sent down the drain, water from showers or sinks is stored in dedicated tanks and treated depending on how it will be used on site. Many regions of the United States are struggling with water shortages. Large areas of the West are contending with moderate to severe drought, while California is now in the fifth year of one of the most extreme droughts in its history. Even non-arid regions, such as the Southeast, are not exempt from water shortages. At the same time, rapid population growth is increasing water demand in many of the nation’s most water-scarce regions, including California, Nevada, Arizona, Texas, and Florida.In these conditions, some state and local governments are looking for innovative ways to save water. One strategy gaining increasing attention is using graywater – water from bathroom sinks, showers, bathtubs, clothes washers, and laundry sinks, but not from toilets or kitchens – for purposes other than drinking, such as flushing toilets.The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine recently published a report that analyzes the potential of graywater reuse, available treatment technologies, and the human health and environmental risks associated with graywater reuse. The study’s committee, on which I served, concluded that reusing graywater can improve water conservation by expanding local water supplies and providing a drought-resistant year-round local water source. A need for guidanceGraywater contains bacteria and pathogens, so it needs to be treated for all indoor uses. Treatment would include disinfection at minimum, and sometimes also removal of dissolved organic matter. Systems for indoor graywater reuse require special plumbing features, including backflow prevention, and graywater treatment processes are complex. These systems must be installed by a certified plumber, and maintenance is critical.However, many states and localities have not adopted treatment guidelines or regulations for indoor graywater use. Los Angeles just released guidelines for indoor use of alternative water sources, such as graywater, early this year. San Francisco also developed a Non-Potable Water Program in 2012 that includes use of graywater for indoor demand.Treatment strategies are available to remove contaminants from graywater, but the lack of widely accepted treatment guidance for various uses limits broader adoption of graywater for indoor use. Developing rigorous, risk-based guidelines for communities that lack them could improve safety and build public confidence while reducing costs of unnecessary treatment.A common standard of treatment could also enable companies to develop treatment systems that can be broadly applied, thereby reducing costs to consumers. The Water Environment Research Federation is currently sponsoring a National Water Research Institute expert panel to develop guidelines for indoor use of alternative water supplies such as graywater.However, treatment guidance alone is not sufficient to protect public health. Graywater reuse to meet indoor demand is most practical at the neighborhood or mult-unit iresidential scale where there is an existing system in place to oversee operations and maintenance.It is important to ensure that systems operate as they were designed to work, so that humans are not exposed to health risks from improperly treated graywater. But overseeing them can create additional burdens for public health departments that may already be stretched thin. Local enforcement agencies would benefit from additional expert guidance on appropriate, cost-effective maintenance, monitoring, and reporting strategies.With appropriate treatment and maintenance of reuse systems, graywater could provide a safe and reliable local water supply for water-scarce cities. Gray WaterHow to Install a Branched-Drain Graywater SystemGraywater: A Precious ResourceUsing a Roof for Rainwater HarvestingCalifornia City Pushes Water ConservationEco-Friendly Palo Alto Ups the Ante Graywater reuse is not a new strategy, but for many years plumbing codes required graywater to be combined with blackwater (wastewater from toilets) and treated through the same system as sewage. In the past decade, however, many states have revised their laws, reflecting the growing interest in graywater reuse. As of 2014, 26 states allowed some form of graywater reuse.Simply reusing graywater to flush toilets can reduce home indoor water use by 24%, on average. Using treated graywater to meet water demand for toilet flushing and laundry has the potential to reduce demand by nearly 36%. Graywater reuse in new multi-unit residential buildings offers clear economies of scale, but we need more data on the cost of such systems.In arid regions such as Southern California, our report showed that household-scale graywater reuse provides larger potential water savings (up to 13% of total water use) than household-scale capture of rainwater from roof runoff using a large cistern (up to 5%). That’s because graywater provides a steady water source during summer months when little or no rainfall occurs.Homeowners often install graywater systems to achieve water and energy efficiency and maintain a reliable supply of water to sustain minimal irrigation during droughts. However, graywater reuse for some applications might not actually save water.Pilot studies of graywater reuse for irrigation in “Laundry to Landscape” programs in Long Beach and San Francisco, California, have shown that it may actually lead to increased water use. This may happen because homeowners expand their landscaped areas or use more water for other purposes when they have graywater available.If water conservation is the primary goal, the first step should be reducing outdoor water use, not using graywater to preserve landscaping that is inappropriate for local climate conditions. For example, in arid regions, water-efficient landscaping provides much larger reductions in water demand than graywater reuse.Graywater reuse for toilet flushing and other indoor uses offers the greatest opportunities for water conservation and does not reduce the amount of water available to downstream water users, as use for outdoor irrigation can. This is a particular value in many western states, where water laws restrict some uses of alternative water supplies to protect the availability of water to downstream water rights holders. Sybil Sharvelle is Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Colorado State University. Stephanie Johnson, senior staff officer with the Water Science and Technology Board of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, contributed to this article. This originally appeared at The Conversation. GREEN PRODUCT GUIDE RELATED ARTICLES last_img read more

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Free Filmmaking Wisdom

first_imgFilm IndependentFilm Independent’s mission is to “champion the cause of independent film and support a community of artists who embody diversity, innovation and uniqueness of vision.” They do that through a whole host of various events, communities, festivals and forums. In these sound bites you get a sense of the quality of a Film Independent event and the quality of the discussions. If you can get to one, you definitely should. The global filmmaking community is an invaluable resource for established and aspiring filmmakers alike. Bookmark these great online resources for insightful filmmaking wisdom.If you’re just starting out on your filmmaking career then learning from those who have gone before you is a fantastic way to help find your feet in an ever changing industry. Today’s technology opens the doors to anyone who wants to make a film, even just on their iPhone, as long as they have the will to make it happen.We all need wisdom, encouragement and inspiration along the way so it is well worth dipping in and out of these great resources on a regular basis for an extra boost to keep pursuing your filmmaking dreams.Film CourageFilm Courage offers excellent nuts and bolts advice to independent filmmakers in a straight shooting format. If you want to hear from expert professionals who have living and breathing what they’re describing (most having started from scratch) this is the place to start.Film Courage covers every practical aspect of filmmaking from networking, financing, writing, directing and much more. Time spent here is time well spent. BAFTA GuruThe BAFTA Guru series is a hugely impressive collection of lectures, interviews and short insights from a star studded collection of actors, directors, producers, writers, editors, sound designers and more. You could spend hours and hours absorbing all of these opinions and perspectives so it’s probably best to focus your attention the creative sphere that most interests you.center_img BFI – Ask An ExpertThe British Film Institute has a great YouTube channel called ‘Ask an Expert‘ which features some fantastic Q&A’s with world renown filmmaking experts including directors, actors, documentary makers and more. All of the questions have been suggested via Facebook and Twitter, so if you want to be to post a question – keep an eye on those social networks.last_img read more

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Ceres-Negros faces tough odds vs JDT in AFC Cup semis

first_imgLATEST STORIES Palace: Duterte to hear out security execs on alleged China control of NGCP Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast JDT’s Mexican coach Benjamin Mora knows the Malaysians are in for a dogfight. “We expect a difficult game because the first leg was a tough game,” said Mora. “Ceres is a very good team. They play good football. They are very fast. And they shape very well defensively.”Mora stressed that the two away goals scored by Ceres shouldn’t get in the way of JDT’s play. “I think we must be patient and organized because we lead the 3-2,” said the Mexican. “I know the two away goals may affect if we don’t stay focused and don’t manage the game as we want.”ADVERTISEMENT Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games MOST READ Roach: Pacquiao needs to KO Horn to land big fights A standing-room-only crowd watches Ceres-Negros’ recent match against Malaysia’s Felda United in the AFC Cup. No other place in the country packs as many football fans as Bacolod’s Panaad stadium. —CONTRIBUTED PHOTO / STEPHEN TANBACOLOD CITY – On its home turf, Ceres-Negros has looked unstoppable in the 2017 AFC Cup. But the Busmen face their toughest test yet when they try to overturn a 2-3 deficit against Johor Darul Ta’zim of Malaysia in the second leg of their AFC Cup Asean zonal semifinal tie at Panaad Stadium. ADVERTISEMENT Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’center_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast The Busmen beat Tampines Rovers (5-0) and Hanoi FC of Vietnam (6-2) in the group stage, but the stakes are higher and the opposition is expected to be stronger when the Malaysian champions line up against the home side at 7:30 p.m. “The team is motivated to win so we are not under pressure,” said Ceres coach Risto Vidakovic from Serbia. “I think its a big challenge to play this game and the opportunity also to reach something. It’s a special motivation for us if we can reach the final.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingThere will be no shortage in firepower for the Busmen with first leg goalscorers Fernando Rodriguez and Bienvenido Maranon available for selection, while midfielder Manny Ott, still hurting from a chest injury in the first leg last May 17, is also in the squad to rekindle his battle with JDT talisman Safiq Rahim, who scored in the first leg at Larkin Stadium. With the away goals rule in play, the Philippines Football League side only needs a 1-0 victory over the Malaysian champions to advance to the next round, where they will face the winner of the Home United-Global Cebu tie being played Tuesday night in Singapore. Every 18 seconds someone is diagnosed with HIV Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games BSP survey: PH banks see bright horizon amid dark global recession clouds Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR View commentslast_img read more

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Baker Mayfield Calls It “Ridiculous” That Buddy Hield Didn’t Win Player Of The Year

first_imgA closeup of a helmetless Baker Mayfield.NORMAN, OK – DECEMBER 3: Quarterback Baker Mayfield #6 of the Oklahoma Sooners during warm ups before the game Oklahoma State Cowboys December 3, 2016 at Gaylord Family-Oklahoma Memorial Stadium in Norman, Oklahoma. Oklahoma defeated Oklahoma State 38-20 to become Big XII champions. (Photo by Brett Deering/Getty Images)Thursday afternoon, it was announced that Michigan State’s Denzel Valentine – not Oklahoma’s Buddy Hield – had won the AP’s Player of the Year award in college basketball. Valentine had a fantastic season, leading MSU to a Big Ten Tournament title and a 2-seed in the NCAA Tournament, but there is certainly a faction of fans who believe that Hield, whose dominance has been on display the past two weeks, was the most deserving player.Oklahoma quarterback Baker Mayfield – who is probably a little biased – is one of them. Mayfield took to Twitter this afternoon to call it “ridiculous” that Valentine won the award over Hield. He even went as far as to say that Hield got “robbed.”This is ridiculous, POTY is supposed to go to the best player. Our man got robbed. Plus who’s team is still playing? https://t.co/k0uiq17kur— Baker Mayfield (@baker_mayfield6) March 31, 2016Whoever voted on this should be ashamed of themselves. We know who the real POTY is. Buddy deserves it, and he’ll show us why these next 2— Baker Mayfield (@baker_mayfield6) March 31, 2016Mayfield also noted that it’s Hield’s OU squad, not Valentine’s MSU, that is still playing.We imagine that Mayfield’s opinion will be popular in Norman.last_img read more

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