BLOG: Capital BlueCross Announces Donation to Equip Police with Naloxone (ROUND-UP)

first_img December 15, 2015 BLOG: Capital BlueCross Announces Donation to Equip Police with Naloxone (ROUND-UP) By: Sophie Stone, Deputy Press Secretary Government That Works,  Round-Up,  Substance Use Disorder,  The Blog Yesterday, Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs Secretary Gary Tennis and Pennsylvania Physician General Dr. Rachel Levine stood with Capital BlueCross officials as they announced their latest action in battling the heroin crisis in Pennsylvania. Capital BlueCross has donated $100,000 to further equip police across Pennsylvania with naloxone, a lifesaving opioid overdose reversal drug. Police have reversed more than 500 overdoses over the past year.The donation will be distributed by the Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association in Capital BlueCross’ 21-county service area.The Wolf administration is leading efforts to fight the heroin and opioid addiction and overdose epidemic. The 2015-16 budget includes a $9 million initiative to combat the heroin epidemic. Earlier this month, Department of General Services Secretary Curt Topper announced that Pennsylvania Capitol Police are now trained to administer and will carry naloxone. In October, Pennsylvania’s Physician General Dr. Rachel Levine signed a statewide standing order for naloxone, making it possible for all Pennsylvanians to access the life-saving drug. The Wolf Administration announced in April that the Pennsylvania State Police would carry naloxone, so that those troopers who are first on the scene of an overdose can have another tool on-hand during these emergencies.Check out some of the coverage of yesterday’s announcement:LNP: Capital BlueCross contributes $100,000 to get heroin antidote naloxone to police.“Capital BlueCross said Monday it is giving $100,000 to police departments in 21 Pennsylvania counties including Lancaster so they can purchase the heroin antidote naloxone. The announcement was praised by state health officials, who say the state is battling the worst epidemic of drug overdoses and deaths it has ever seen. ‘With this money, we have the potential to help not only hundreds of people with the disease of addiction, but the thousands of family members and friends whose lives are also affected,’ said Gary Tennis, secretary of the Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs.” [LNP, 12/15/15]Harrisburg Patriot-News: Midstate insurer provides another dose of heroin overdose life-saver.“Capital BlueCross said Monday it will spend another $100,000 to put naloxone into police cars in its 21-county service area that includes the midstate… State officials recently said that as of late November, police officers had used naloxone to save 453 overdose victims… State Secretary of Drug and Alcohol Programs Gary Tennis said, ‘For the second time, [Capital has] stepped forward as a leader in fighting the worst overdose death epidemic this state has ever seen … With this money, we have the potential to help not only hundreds of people with the disease of addiction, but the thousands of family members and friends whose lives are also affected.’” [Harrisburg Patriot-News, 12/14/15]WITF: Health insurer donates $100K for life-saving drug for overdoses.“Capital BlueCross is donating $100,000 to equip police officers with a life-saving drug. The contribution comes less than a year after it first offered $50,000 to departments to purchase naloxone, and just as Pennsylvania’s heroin death toll is expected to top last year’s high. That’s despite more than 500 life-saving uses of naloxone, which reverses a heroin or other opioid overdose in a matter of minutes. Capital BlueCross’s donation will pay for 1,000 naloxone kits, which many police departments now carry.” [WITF, 12/14/15]York Daily Record: BlueCross donates $100k for Naloxone.“Central Pennsylvania insurance company Capital BlueCross has donated another $100,000 to supply Pennsylvania police with the medication that reverses heroin overdoses… ‘What it effectively does is, at $100 a kit, you’re talking about saving 1,000 lives of Pennsylvanians,’ [York County District Attorney Tom] Kearney said. ‘And that is just incredible.’ Gary Tennis, secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs, said, ‘On behalf of all the people whose lives will be saved by this generous donation, I thank Capital BlueCross.’” [York Daily Record, 12/14/15]ABC27: Capital BlueCross donates $100K for heroin antidote.“Capital BlueCross is donating $100,000 to get a heroin antidote to police departments in central Pennsylvania. The donation will pay for 1,000 naloxone kits, which cost about $100 each. Naloxone, also known as Narcan, can reverse the effects of a heroin overdose. Pennsylvania police departments have reversed 522 overdoses since they began carrying naloxone this year.” [ABC27, 12/14/15]center_img See Secretary Gary Tennis’ blog about Continuing Pennsylvania’s Fight Against Heroin.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Through community organizations, Iovine and Young student hopes to break ‘narrow societal norms’

first_imgStudent Samantha Broxton looks to incorporate her degree with activities she’s involved in including her natural hair and lifestyle community. (Photo courtesy of Samantha Broxton) Growing up watching her mother take on long shifts, late nights and earn low wages despite her hard work, Samantha Broxton’s determination and work ethic was practically ingrained in her since the beginning of her childhood. Now, it’s made evident when looking at all she is juggling while pursuing her master’s degree in integrated design, business and technology.  “I want to help build out a company that is holistic and has [a] positive presence in whatever community they’re doing work in,” Broxton said. “I do think in the latter years of my working life, I would love to help launch micro-businesses in small towns and small communities.” Raising Self and Broxton’s other multifaceted endeavors are just some things that she hopes to continue. In the future, she said she envisions herself as a leader in the finance industry and a volunteer within her community for years to come, but she also wants to build out her own dreams and launch her own businesses. “She’s already done so much,” Polonio said. “If she’s run this fast in her life, I just can’t wait to see the rest of her life unfold and the amazing things that she will continue to do that benefit the world around her.” When her 10-year-old daughter Sophie,  expressed curiosity in robotics, Broxton was committed to finding a program that would cater to her interests. After searching through several programs that worked primarily with older children, Broxton stumbled across Black Girls CODE, a non-profit organization that aims to provide Black girls from ages 7 to 17 with the technology and education to excel in STEM-related fields.  Jasmine Moore, the volunteer lead for BGC L.A., works with Broxton on projects to increase community engagement. Together, they build connections between the organization and companies such as Google, as well as other potential partners and sponsors. Moore said Broxton brings a unique perspective to the organization since she has two children ages 9 and 10. From the start of her involvement with Black Girls CODE, Broxton, who now serves as the community outreach lead for the organization’s L.A. chapter, noticed the impact the organization was having on her daughter. As compared to where Broxton grew up in South Florida, the area where she and her family live in Irvine, Calif. is much less ethnically and culturally diverse, which impacted her daughter’s attitude toward herself, Broxton said.  “I do think anything’s possible in the near future,” Broxton said. “I do think there’s a lot of really great, cool things happening as far as STEAM and STEM and inclusivity in Southern California, and organizations like USC are natural partners for that kind of work.” “She’s very good at being relatable,” Moore said. “She knows what that demographic needs. So Samantha’s always been really passionate and excited about the work we’re doing and really getting out there and being part of the community.”  In many of her endeavors, Broxton works on increasing inclusivity in predominantly white industries. Similar to the work she does with BGC, she also encourages inclusivity in other professional sectors, such as finance. It was during her experience in finance that Broxton was influenced to create SisterLocked, an online community focusing on natural hair, lifestyle, beauty and fashion.  Keisha Polonio, former executive director of Created Tampa, met Broxton through the organization when she volunteered to help women who have been sex trafficked or sexually exploited. From the minute the two met, Polonio said she was impressed with all that Broxton had already accomplished and is eager to see what else Broxton will achieve. center_img “She became more aware of her otherness,” Broxton said of Sophie’s experience in their community. “It was really important for her to have a space in which she was around other girls that she could see herself in and other teachers and support groups that were talking about science and about the things that she was interested in, but also looked like her.”  “I’ve always loved storytelling, I’ve always loved communicating,” Broxton said. “It was a really good outlet during a time where it’s super scary to frame my narrative and document my journey and form community with other interesting people all around.”  Not only is she a full-time student, but Broxton is also the founder of her own natural hair and lifestyle community, the creator of a blog centered on her personal home life and the community outreach lead for Black Girls CODE L.A. “Sometimes Black women are risking it all to fit a narrow societal norm, so I wanted a space to talk about natural hair [and] natural living,” Broxton said. “It doesn’t matter what your hair looks like as long as you feel good, you feel confident [and] you don’t feel forced to have it.”  Broxton and her daughter attended the first event for the organization’s newly launched Los Angeles chapter in 2016. Immediately after, both of them looked to become thoroughly involved in BGC. As Sophie was learning about topics including coding and 3D printing as a student, Samantha was spreading information about the organization’s missions and opportunities to other parents and caretakers as a BGC volunteer. Broxton said she hopes to help expand the organization throughout L.A. County. Bringing the group to USC’s campus is a possibility, she said.  Before seeking a degree at USC, Broxton was working in commercial finance. After receiving her bachelor’s degree from the University of South Florida in 2008, Broxton pursued commercial banking at companies such as BB&T. On the side, however, she was also working on her own passion projects, such as her blog and her natural hair and living community. Knowing the value of following one’s dreams, it was obvious to Broxton that she needed to encourage her children to explore their own interests and passions as well.  In addition to creating SisterLocked, which now has about 35,000 followers across several social media platforms, Broxton also made her own blog, Raising Self. The blog — where Broxton writes about her personal life — was made as a creative avenue during a fluctuating time in her life. Becoming a mother so soon after starting her career, Broxton said she had lots of thoughts about motherhood, work life and relationships that she wanted to express.   In hopes of ultimately piloting her own startup, Broxton said she wants to incorporate her future Iovine and Young Academy degree with her previous experience in finance to truly create something that aligns with endeavors she has been involved in. Broxton wants to use the degree to build connections with entrepreneurs and other like-minded individuals who she can work with on future business ventures.  In many traditional industries, Black women are pressured to wear hairstyles that are not always attainable or natural for them in order to look “more professional,” Broxton said. While Broxton had locs during her corporate career, she observed that other Black women were not able to wear natural styles during their professional life. After receiving numerous questions on Facebook from women asking about her hair, Broxton founded the online community.last_img read more

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Cover 2: Even Sherman and Rice can’t help Stanford

first_imgFormer U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, center watches play between Dayton and Stanford during the first half in a regional semifinal game at the NCAA college basketball tournament, Thursday, March 27, 2014, in Memphis, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)Welcome back to BracketRacket, the one-stop shopping place for all offbeat NCAA tournament needs. In today’s edition, we plumb Richard Sherman’s psyche, debunk Peyton Manning’s talismanic quality, examine Mitch McConnell’s phobia and go channel-surfing with John Calipari. Without further ado:___CELEBRITY ALUM(S) OF THE DAYStanford was getting sliced-and-diced again as the second half began, right in front of his eyes. Somebody had to step in.“They need a lockdown defender,” a member of the CBS broadcast crew said.Conveniently, one happened to be sitting nearby. Two if you count Condoleezza Rice.Richard Sherman’s seat at the South Regional in Memphis was a row in front of hers (from Twitter: http://bit.ly/OZBii9 ). But then he got his tickets from Tim Tebow (same agent.).Rice has been a fellow, a professor and the provost at Stanford, and U.S. Secretary of State, but apparently she doesn’t have as much pull. Either way, and other than Dayton clocking the old alma mater 82-72, they appeared to be having a grand time.You might recall that Sherman, who plays cornerback for the Super Bowl champion Seattle Seahawks, made sideline reporting hazardous duty for a few minutes a few months ago (via YouTube.com: http://bit.ly/1g5GN4H ).But Thursday night, he was his off-the-field self, which is to say both engaging and chilled when AP freelancer Clay Bailey asked whether it was tough watching his team get beat without jumping in.“Not when it’s not your sport,” Sherman replied coolly. “It’s easier to watch when it’s not your sport.”That explains a lot.___CELEBRITY ALUM OF TOMORROW?Meanwhile, the last guy who crossed Richard Sherman’s path in his sport probably regrets it still.That would be his opponent in the Super Bowl nearly two months ago, Denver Broncos quarterback and Tennessee alum Peyton Manning.Manning’s Vols face Michigan on Friday at Lucas Oil Stadium — aka “The House That Peyton Built,” by turning the once-sorry Indianapolis Colts franchise into a powerhouse before he left town in late 2011. Even if he doesn’t put in an appearance during the game, someone asked Tennessee coach Cuonzo Martin whether some of the old Manning magic might rub off on his team.“I hope so,” Martin said. “He’s texted me several times wishing us good luck.”Decide for yourself whether that’s a good thing. There’s the recent Super Bowl loss, then there’s the time Manning turned up at the women’s Final Four at Indy in 2005, when Pat Summitt’s Lady Vols lost to Michigan State. And just last October, the Colts spoiled Manning’s “homecoming” and ended Denver’s quest for an unbeaten season with a 39-33 win.The Vols will understand if he has a previous commitment to honor — somewhere else.___TODAY IN KENTUCKY BASKETBALLFor a guy with two teams still in it, Mitch McConnell probably can’t wait for the tourney to end. It’s been one headache after another.The senate minority leader was raised in Louisville, got his B.A. there, and by most accounts is a rabid Cardinals fan. But he got his law degree from Kentucky.AP’s intrepid congressional reporter, Donna Cassata, tried to get him on the record last year about which team he backs. She looked on helplessly Tuesday as McConnell — who was in the middle of a back-and-forth with reporters about the Ukraine — sidestepped the question yet again, ahead of Friday night’s Louisville-Kentucky clash at the Sweet 16 in Indianapolis.“You know, I didn’t get this far in my line of work by answering questions like that,” he said to laughs. “That is the hottest issue in our state.”McConnell briefly distracted the gathering by citing an article he’d read that when “college basketball is on, there are more eyeballs watching college basketball in the Louisville, Kentucky, media market than any other media market in the country. So it is a passion in our state.”OK, we get it.So who you got?“My law school classmate, the governor, has refused to take a position on this important game,” McConnell finally said, “and I think he’s got it right.”By recent standards, that was practically a command performance. The other question McConnell has been ducking lately is how a clip of Duke basketball players celebrating their 2010 national championship wound up in a campaign video that hit all the state’s other touchstones: horse racing, bluegrass, guns and American flags.The images of the team in white and blue reveling as confetti rains down was on for no more than a split-second. Even so, a few of those “eyeballs” saw it and nearly popped out of their passionate owners’ heads. McConnell’s campaign blamed the mistake on the vendor. Might it have been pressure instead?The incumbent Republican is up for re-election in November, likely against Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes. If nothing else, she was a lot more candid about her bracket. She picked Wichita State to beat Kentucky (didn’t happen) and Florida to beat defending champ Louisville in the title game.Not saying McConnell’s campaign shouldn’t be nervous.But at the moment, Grimes seems more focused on winning her office pool than the senate seat.___SEE NO EVIL — AND ANYWAY, THE ADULT CHANNELS HAVE BEEN BLOCKEDWaiting around to play a basketball game can be tough on the nerves. With so many of his highly regarded freshmen finally fulfilling their promise, Kentucky coach John Calipari is worried more about egos.At Thursday’s news conference, he repeated the instructions he gave his young Wildcats when they were finished with practice and under lockdown (presumably) in their hotel rooms. He’d rather they stare at blank walls and then hear about how good they’ve become.“Don’t watch any TV,” Calipari began. “Watch the History Channel, watch Biography, watch the military channel, watch movies and don’t read anything, don’t look at anything.”He better hope his players aren’t nearly as sharp as some his fans (see above). Because the way March Madness is settling in, UK basketball will probably make a cameo on all those channels and more.We suggest Animal Planet’s “River Monsters”, which was the go-to show for UConn star Shabazz Napier last year when he wanted to avoid any mention of the tournament. OK, so UConn was barred from last year’s NCAAs because of academic sanctions, but they weren’t going to get mentioned, anyway. Not only that; it’s all fishing all the time.“I love fishing,” said Napier, whose Huskies face Iowa State on Friday night in New York. “And I could get the smallest fish, but I think it’s the biggest fish ever.”Quit bragging.___STAT OF THE DAYIn honor of the bluegrass state, STATS offers handicappers this tip: Based on the experience level of the teams, each of Friday’s four regional semifinals is a potential mismatch. Looking at total tournament man-games on each team’s roster entering 2014, the matchups break down this way: Michigan State (49 man-games) vs. Virginia (three); Louisville (53) against Kentucky (nine); Michigan (47) battling Tennessee (five) and Connecticut (23) vs. Iowa State (nine).And they’re off!___QUOTE OF THE DAY“People grieve for a year after the game. People celebrate for a year after the game. I’ve tried to not make it bigger than it is. But it doesn’t work.” — Calipari on the Louisville-Kentucky rivalry.___THURSDAY’S RESULTSRegional SemifinalsSouth RegionalAt Memphis, Tenn.Dayton 82, Stanford 72Florida 79, UCLA 68West RegionalAt Anaheim, Calif.Wisconsin 69, Baylor 52Arizona 70, San Diego State 64FRIDAY’S GAMESRegional SemifinalsEast RegionalAt New YorkUConn (28-8) vs. Iowa State (28-7)Michigan State (28-8) vs. Virginia (30-6)Midwest RegionalAt IndianapolisKentucky (26-10) vs. Louisville (31-5)Michigan (27-8) vs. Tennessee (24-12)last_img read more

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Refugee children face harrowing detention in Southeast Asia

first_imgFrom overcrowding to a lack of medical care, thousands of refugee children are languishing in “dangerous and harrowing” conditions in Southeast Asian detention facilities, according to two charities.Over 2,290 refugee and asylum seeker children were held in Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia at the end of 2016, according to Save the Children and the Asia Pacific Refugee Rights Network in a report released on Thursday.The three nations have been on key transit routes for thousands of migrants and asylum seekers, from countries including Myanmar, Bangladesh and Afghanistan, who are trying to flee violence or poverty at home to reach Australia.But they are often intercepted during these journeys, and authorities typically treat asylum seekers and refugees as illegal immigrants, subjecting them to arrest or detention.”These children should not be treated like criminals,” said Mike Novell, Save the Children’s interim director for Asia.”The impact this environment has on children is extremely damaging… It can lead to developmental delays and self-harm while putting children at very real risk of violence, sexual abuse and exploitation.”Based on analysis of immigration policies and interviews with a small number of child detainees, the report found children often being detained with unrelated adults and separated from their families.Some were forced to sleep in “cramped and substandard” conditions, including on cardboard or directly on the floor, the report said, and were given food that was “unpalatable”.It found some children were housed in cells so hot it was difficult to breathe, and on some occasions in rooms so overcrowded they could not lie down at night with their legs fully extended.”There’s a lot of germs… the weather was so hot… we cannot breathe ourselves easily because it’s really hot inside,” the report quoted a 14-year-old girl, who was detained in a cell with 150 other people, as saying.The charities said although the number of child detainees in Asia-Pacific had fallen by over 50 percent at the end of 2016 compared with 2014, countries must move to end child detention entirely.In Australia, where nearly all children have been released from detention in recent years, the two rights groups called for a review of the country’s laws which still allow the practice.Governments should adopt community housing or foster care for unaccompanied child instead, the charities urged, saying they are a more humane and cheaper alternative.last_img read more

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Trump Administration Moves To Reshape Who Qualifies For Asylum

first_img Share John Moore/Getty ImagesWomen and children arriving from Central America are claiming they’re eligible for asylum because they’ve been the victims of gangs, or domestic violence, in their home countries. But some critics, like former immigration judge Andrew Arthur, say claiming asylum has become a “sort of catchall for truly inventive lawyers.”The Trump administration is taking steps to limit who gets asylum in the United States, and immigration lawyers are warning that thousands of people who fled violence and persecution in their home countries could be turned away.Attorney General Jeff Sessions is using his authority to reshape the law on who qualifies for asylum, and whether they get a hearing in court. Sessions has intervened in two cases that could have big implications for people who come to the U.S. and seek asylum.This comes as the number of applications for asylum has risen sharply in recent years. Sessions has been trying to eliminate what he’s called “rampant fraud and abuse” in those applications, and to cut into a massive backlog of immigration cases.But immigrant rights advocates fear that legitimate asylum-seekers, including victims of domestic violence, could be denied sanctuary here.“They are amongst the most vulnerable people in our society,” said Jeremy McKinney, an immigration lawyer in North Carolina, and secretary of the American Immigration Lawyers Association. “To have their rights curtailed so that the system moves faster I think should be considered a moral outrage,” he said.To Attorney General Sessions, the outrage is that immigrants are gumming up the courts with false claims.“The system is being gamed, there’s no doubt about it,” Sessions said in October of last year, in a speech to the Executive Office for Immigration Review in Virginia. Back then, he was asking Congress to tighten asylum rules. Last week, he acted on this own.In one case, the attorney general vacated a precedent-setting ruling that said most asylum seekers have a right to a hearing in front of a judge before their claim could be rejected. In a second case, Sessions is reviewing whether victims of “private crime” should qualify for asylum.These moves come as no surprise to anyone who’s followed Sessions’s positions on immigration and asylum.“We can close loopholes and clarify our asylum laws to ensure that they help those they were intended to help,” Sessions said in his October speech. “As this system becomes overloaded with fake claims, it cannot deal effectively with just claims.”Immigration courts do face a huge backlog — upwards of 600,000 cases, more than triple the number in 2009.One factor driving that growing backlog is constant stream of women and children from Central America. Many of these migrants claim they’re eligible for asylum because they’ve been the victims of gangs, or domestic violence, in their home countries.But some, like former immigration judge Andrew Arthur, are skeptical about this kind of claim.“It’s actually become sort of a catchall for truly inventive lawyers,” said Arthur, who is now a fellow at the Center for Immigration studies, which advocates for lower levels of immigration.Immigration courts work differently than regular courts. They’re part of the Justice Department, so the attorney general has the power to personally overturn decisions by immigration courts.Arthur, the former immigration judge, applauds the recent moves by Sessions. “One, it is going to streamline the system,” Arthur said. “Two, it’s going to cut down on the number of claims that are inevitably going to be found to be invalid.”Immigration lawyers don’t dispute that the number of asylum applications has spiked. But they offer a different explanation.“The crisis we’re managing is not one of fraud,” said Lenni Benson, a professor at New York Law School, “but one of the global situation.” She pointed to a rise in gang-related violence in Central America that’s pushing migrants north in search of safety.Not every crime makes the victim eligible to claim asylum. The victim must have a well-founded fear of persecution based on certain factors like race or religion, or membership in a “particular social group.” They must also come from a place where the government won’t help them. The law around this has been fiercely litigated, says McKinney, the immigration lawyer.“The fear is that this Justice Department will undo all of those gains that were made through decades of litigation,” he said.McKinney and other lawyers are worried that Sessions is ultimately going to overturn a landmark asylum case from 2014 that made it easier for domestic violence survivors to get asylum.People like Aracely Martinez, who fled to the U.S. from Honduras and got asylum with help from the Tahirih Center for Justice, a nonprofit that supports immigrant women fleeing from violence.“My ex’s family wanted to kill me,” she said through a translator. Martinez was pregnant when the father of two of her children killed their kids and shot her in the head before killing himself.She moved to another part of Honduras. But his family found her and threatened to kill her.“I’d like to see women getting help the way I was helped,” Martinez said. “I finally feel safe in this country.”Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

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Glooko app offers diabetics easier selfchecks

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Therein lies the Glooko difference.Other diabetes-management apps designed for iPhones are not as convenient, or, as one diabetes site blogger put it, they carry the ugh factor of having to input the information manually. Glooko relieves the tedium with its MeterSync cable device. You plug it into the meter and the phone, and that is all.Glooko’s founders include those who have diabetes and those whose lives involve people with the disease, say the vendors. Convenience is what the company hopes will be a key attraction. Another perceived benefit is that the connection cable is compatible with any one of the popular glucose monitors: Bayer Contour, Freestyle Freedom Lite, Freestyle Lite, OneTouch Ultra 2, OneTouch UltraLink and OneTouch UltraMini.“Say goodbye to manually entering blood glucose readings. Say hello to a logbook that fits your lifestyle. Save time and eliminate errors from manual entry by easily and quickly downloading blood glucose readings from your meter to your iPod touch or iPhone,” says the site.Other than convenience, the record-keeping features are able to carry information beyond meter readings. The user can generate a more informative record of the condition, by noting down varied factors that affect blood glucose.The patient can mark off notes about whether the reading was done before or after a meal, the number of carbs consumed, or can click on a predefined list of lifestyle factors.Information from the logbook can then be emailed or faxed as a 14-day summary to the doctor.Any doubt that the application does not have a ready market can be argued too. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 26 million adults and children in the United States — or 8.3 percent of the population — have diabetes.By 2025, one in five people in the U.S. is projected to have diabetes.As for Glooko’s technology decisions to run with Apple devices, the product’s notes and 14-day summaries will make their way to many physicians already using Apple mobile devices on their work.Recent findings indicate that 75 percent of U.S. physicians already own an Apple device, whether a smartphone or iPad. The Glooko product works with Apple devices running iOS 4.3 or later.On the patient side, Glooko is joining a relatively young but growing wave of “patient-centered apps” designed to help people with chronic diseases that need monitoring—such as Vree for Diabetes by Merck & Co., and Novartis’s VaxTrak for tracking family vaccinations. Citation: Glooko app offers diabetics easier self-checks (2011, November 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-11-glooko-app-diabetics-easier-self-checks.html More information: www.glooko.com/ , itunes.apple.com/us/app/glooko … ook/id471942748?mt=8center_img (PhysOrg.com) — A consumer health management app has joined an ever-growing list of Apple App Store items; Glooko helps diabetics check their blood sugar daily. Glooko is a Palo Alto startup that presents its core product as two items: a free-to-download logbook available at iTunes and a fee-charged cable, sold separately, at $39.95 from Amazon. © 2011 PhysOrg.com Interactive mobile app teaches people how to manage diabeteslast_img read more

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New study reveals why jellyfish are such efficient swimmers w Video

first_img For years, jellyfish have been considered a nuisance—they sting swimmers and crowd out other more desirable ocean dwellers. In more recent times, they have become even more of a problem as they grow in both numbers and size—most scientists attribute this to their adaptability to warmer ocean temperatures and a decrease in other populations due to overfishing by humans. Now, it appears they have another natural advantage that gives them an edge over other ocean dwelling creatures as well—they are far more efficient when swimming leaving them more energy to find food and mate.Scientists have known for a long time that jellyfish move through the water by squeezing the bell that forms ahead of their body. That squeezing pushes water backwards forcing the jellyfish forward. More recently it has been learned that they also are pushed forward by a secondary thrust that occurs as the bell is refilling with water. Until now, however, it was unknown just how much benefit jellyfish got from this. Explore further Play Instantaneous pressure field estimations are shown simultaneously with body velocity to demonstrate a mechanistic explanation for how jellyfish can accelerate, and thus gain extra distance, during a period of the swimming cycle in which there is no kinematic motion. Credit: PNAS, Published online before print October 7, 2013, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1306983110 The findings may lead to increases in efficiency in swimming robots as scientists seek to recreate the mechanics of jellyfish—that could mean swimming robots plying the seas sending back data for years on end, or as some have suggested, new kinds of robots that kill real jellyfish. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Play DPIV of a 2-cm A. aurita jellyfish shows the velocity vectors and vorticity produced by swimming. Notice how the stopping vortex forms upstream and on the exumbrellar surface of the animal before recovery. The vortex ring then moves under the bell as its vorticity (energy) increases. Credit: PNAS, Published online before print October 7, 2013, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1306983110 To find out, the researchers anesthetized some test specimens and placed them in a tank filled with very tiny glass beads. As the jellyfish moved in the beads, a laser was shone and reflected off the beads, allowing the researchers to measure its speed and how much energy the creature was expending as it moved. They noted that immediately after squeezing its bell, a vortex formed as the bell relaxed. That vortex pushed against the jellyfish’s body, propelling it forward. More importantly, the researchers found that the secondary thrust required no energy expenditure by the jellyfish at all—it was purely mechanical, like a rubber-band snapping back to its original size after being stretched. That extra boost the researchers report (which averaged about a thirty percent gain) means that jellyfish are by far the most efficient swimmers in the sea, giving them an advantage over virtually all other sea life. © 2013 Phys.orgcenter_img UN warns of jellyfish ‘vicious circle’ in Med More information: Passive energy recapture in jellyfish contributes to propulsive advantage over other metazoans, PNAS, Published online before print October 7, 2013, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1306983110 AbstractGelatinous zooplankton populations are well known for their ability to take over perturbed ecosystems. The ability of these animals to outcompete and functionally replace fish that exhibit an effective visual predatory mode is counterintuitive because jellyfish are described as inefficient swimmers that must rely on direct contact with prey to feed. We show that jellyfish exhibit a unique mechanism of passive energy recapture, which is exploited to allow them to travel 30% further each swimming cycle, thereby reducing metabolic energy demand by swimming muscles. By accounting for large interspecific differences in net metabolic rates, we demonstrate, contrary to prevailing views, that the jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) is one of the most energetically efficient propulsors on the planet, exhibiting a cost of transport (joules per kilogram per meter) lower than other metazoans. We estimate that reduced metabolic demand by passive energy recapture improves the cost of transport by 48%, allowing jellyfish to achieve the large sizes required for sufficient prey encounters. Pressure calculations, using both computational fluid dynamics and a newly developed method from empirical velocity field measurements, demonstrate that this extra thrust results from positive pressure created by a vortex ring underneath the bell during the refilling phase of swimming. These results demonstrate a physical basis for the ecological success of medusan swimmers despite their simple body plan. Results from this study also have implications for bioinspired design, where low-energy propulsion is required. Citation: New study reveals why jellyfish are such efficient swimmers (w/ Video) (2013, October 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-10-reveals-jellyfish-efficient-swimmers-video.html Aequorea victoria. Image credit: Sierra Blakely/Wikipedia. (Phys.org) —A team of researchers in the U.S. has found that jellyfish are extremely efficient swimmers. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team reports using a technique called particle image velocimetry to measure the secondary thrust jellyfish use to increase their energy efficiency when swimming. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Scienceslast_img read more

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Writers experiences with cinematic adaptations

first_imgIt can be one of the most controversial outcomes of writing a popular book – that it will be adapted into a film and in the process, lose a part of its plot, characterisation and the ability to get into the characters’ mindset and motivations. No matter how faithful to the written version, there will be something that will enrage the book’s admirers. But what do the writers themselves think? Addressing this seminal question were five acclaimed novelists and/or screenwriters of contemporary times, who had different views on this issue which spans authorship, creative freedom, interpretation and differences in story-telling across various media. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfSetting the ball rolling was Booker Prize winner Michael Ondaatje, who felt that turning a novel into a film first entailed finding “a short story within it.” Holding there were many feted but not that simple films, he, however, said their plots or style cannot be as complex as those of novels, citing the case of his ‘The English Patient’, whose film version cut out the book’s non-chronological narrative to make a more coherent depiction onscreen. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveHowever, he acknowledged, filmmaking has its unique techniques or “subliminal elements”, which can lead to the entire story being restructured in the various stages of the adaptation.Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Mira Nair stated that retaining the book’s essence is as important as creative freedom, noting she treats her works with “the same love and idiosyncrasies.” Of her adaptation of Jhumpa Lahiri’s ‘The Namesake’, she said that author created the novel, and she shepherded the film’s direction with her own inventiveness in meaning-making. This included, she said, an added focus on the parents’ point-of-view and visual dimensions of Kolkata absent in the book, part of her “inventions that make the film breathe and feel like it’s of the soil.” For Chinese-American author Amy Tan, the 1993 movie adaptation of her ‘The Joy Luck Club’, for which she co-wrote the screenplay, had to fit into its own form. What was important to her was finding the heart and soul of the book and creating a fresh narrative for the cinematic form. “I was more disrespectful to my book than the filmmakers!” she admitted but added that she felt no artistic disconnect with the film version which retained the essence of her story.Tan also opined that the power of cinematic adaptation also lay in the “freedom to sculpt a distinct narrative.”British novelist and screenwriter Nicholas Shakespeare added that in cinema the medium changes, and a central character in the novel can be replaced with the vantage point of the camera, while a screenwriter has the additional access to music and silences.But his compatriot, veteran playwright (“Arcadia”, “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead” etc) and Academy award-winning screenwriter (“The Russia House”, “Shakespeare in Love”) Sir Tom Stoppard believes that the “malleability of form subverts any attempt at making a unified declaration of adapting books to screen.”Stoppard admitted that as a text-driven writer, he finds himself “pitched between a moral duty to be faithful to work and a professional duty to be the handmaiden of the director” but added that between the two, he would be more inclined to be more defensive of the film, because of his intimacy with the form.The greatest of films are not those that follow rules to ensure risk-free filmmaking but those that are “transcendent rule-breakers”, he contended,Asked which of his works he felt didn’t work on the screen, he quipped: “Which one worked, by the way?”last_img read more

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Capturing Latin America through an Indian travellers lens

first_imgThe embassies and high commissions of the Group of Latin American and Caribbean Countries (GRULAC) based in New Delhi, held the felicitation ceremony of the ‘My Latin American Trip 2017’ photography competition in the Capital. This photo-competition, now entering its third year, is open to all Indian tourists, to submit photographs from their travels to Latin America and the Caribbean countries. The second edition of the contest received 70 entries from non-professional photographers, who shared photographs of their adventures in the Latin American and Caribbean region. The submissions were evaluated by a committee comprising of officials from the GRULAC missions, who shortlisted 19 finalists. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe appreciation awards were presented by representatives of Mexico, Peru, Argentina, and Chile. Speaking on the occasion, Ambassador Han Dannenberg Castellanos, Dean of Diplomatic Corps stressed on the importance of public and cultural diplomacy in bringing the Latin American and Caribbean region closer to the Indian tourists. The exhibition of winning photographs, along with all the other submissions was also inaugurated for public viewing. The exhibit is on display at the Art Gallery, Embassy of Peru till February 16.last_img read more

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WestJets heading to France with new HalifaxParis service more route updates for

first_img Share Travelweek Group Posted by Tags: France, New Routes, Paris, WestJet WestJet’s heading to France with new Halifax-Paris service; more route updates for 2018center_img CALGARY — WestJet’s brand new 2018 summer schedule, released today, strengthens the airline’s expansion plans as it develops a global route network with new daily direct flights into Paris, between Halifax Stanfield International Airport (YHZ) and Charles de Gaulle Airport (CDG) in Paris.All flights will be operated on WestJet’s Boeing 737-8 MAX aircraft. New Halifax flights into Gatwick Airport (LGW) in London have also been added. One-way intro fares from Halifax to Paris or London are available now for $199 all-in.“As the carrier with the most transatlantic flights from Halifax, we are thrilled to announce our first foray onto the European mainland,” said Ed Sims, WestJet Executive Vice-President, Commercial.Starting May 31, WestJet will begin service with daily flights between Halifax and Paris. On April 29, WestJet will begin daily service between Halifax and London (Gatwick). In addition, WestJet will add one flight to Halifax from Calgary for a total of 15 weekly flights.WestJet currently serves 16 cities from the Halifax International Airport, up from six in 2013, including 10 Canadian, two transborder, one international and three European destinations; at peak summer schedule, the airline will operate more than 25 flights per week. Since 2012, the airline’s traffic from Halifax has grown by more than 160 per cent.“Venturing to London and now Paris is an indication of our ambitious growth plans as we move towards becoming a global network carrier. This is an investment that will help launch new flights in the future and further expand our presence in YHZ – a key driver in economic and employment growth,” said Sims.More news:  Consolidation in the cruise industry as PONANT set to acquire Paul Gauguin Cruises“We’re delighted with WestJet’s new routes to and from Halifax, as France and the U.K. are among the largest tourism markets and most important trading partners in Europe. Strengthening ties with strategic markets in Europe is good for inbound tourism, trade, investment and immigration,” says Joyce Carter, President and CEO of Halifax International Airport Authority. “This announcement demonstrates confidence in our community, our region and our future as Halifax Stanfield connects travellers to and from Europe and beyond. WestJet’s newest destinations from Halifax also tie us to our past when you consider our strong European roots, including our rich Acadian culture in the Maritimes.”To Paris, daily flights will leave Hafalix at 10:55 p.m., arriving at 10 a.m. the next day. On the return leg, flights leave Paris at 11:20 a.m., returning to Halifax at 1:35 p.m.To London, flights leave Halifax at 10:35 p.m., arriving at 8:21 a.m. the next day starting April 29. On the return leg, flights leave London at 9:50 a.m., arriving in Halifax at 1 p.m.The intro one-way all in fares from $199 must be booked by Feb. 5, 2018 for travel on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays between May 31 and Oct. 27, 2018.Here are more routes from the newly released summer 2018 schedule:The addition of almost 200 flights to WestJet’s hubs including 60 to Vancouver, 72 to Calgary and 28 to Toronto.New nonstop four-time weekly service between Calgary and Whitehorse.Additional flights from Vancouver to a number of domestic and international destinations including Cancun, Cabo San Lucas, Edmonton, Kelowna, Ottawa, Regina, Fort St. John and Victoria.Additional flights from Calgary to a number of transborder and sun destinations including Nashville, Cancun, Dallas / Ft. Worth and Las Vegas.Additional flights from Calgary to a number of domestic destinations including Nanaimo, Edmonton, Halifax, Kelowna, Fort McMurray, Windsor, Grand Prairie, Montreal, Abbotsford, Penticton and Victoria.An increase of 24 weekly flights between Vancouver and Calgary for a total of 16 times daily, with hourly service in both directions (top of the hour from Vancouver, and bottom of the hour from Calgary).Additional flights from Edmonton to a number of transborder and domestic destinations including Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Kelowna, Fort McMurray and Saskatoon.An increase of 14 weekly flights between Edmonton and Calgary for a total of 12 times daily.Additional flights from Toronto to a number of sun destinations including Cancun, Montego Bay, Nassau, Puerto Plata, Punta Cana and Fort Myers.Additional flights from Toronto to a number of Canadian destinations including Ottawa, Montreal, Saskatoon and Victoria.An increase of nine new weekly flights between Toronto and Ottawa for a total of 13 times daily.An increase of nine weekly flights between Toronto and Montreal for a total of 14 times daily. Monday, January 29, 2018 << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more

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