Three debutants in Dover’s 23-man squad for Grenada friendly

first_imgNINETEEN-year-old full-back Terence Vancooten, who plays for Stevenage Football Club in the English Football League Two, along with Nicholas Peters (Mabaruma, Region 1) and Frank Parks (Guyana Rush Saints FC, Region 9), will make his international debut after being named in coach Wayne Dover’s 23-man squad to tackle Grenada on Saturday at the Kirani James Stadium in St George’s.Terence VancootenSeventeen overseas-based players were called by Dover, who said the squad represents “mixture of youth and experience and is a good sign of the changing of the guards in the not-too-distant future especially with the addition of new players.”In preparation for the match, Dover had shortlisted 26 local-based players for a period of encampment, but in the case of Peters and Frank, the two, according to the Guyana Football Federation (GFF), were selected based on their performance at the just-concluded Indigenous Heritage Games and the Charity Match involving a GFF President’s XI and an Indigenous All-Stars which was played last Sunday.The Hinterland players, Dover said, “warranted their immediate call-up” based on the skills displayed, adding, “Parks is no stranger to the national set-up. He played with the junior team and demonstrated the potential to be a top player. He has a football background as all of his siblings represented Guyana and were outstanding.Peters is a solid defender who showed he can handle players, the likes of Gregory Richardson. He showed all the attributes that a central defender has to possess.”Walter Moore, who plays with FF Jaro in the Finnish professional league, will be making a return to the Golden Jaguars from retirement after signalling his desire to retire last October following the Caribbean Cup game.Among those included too is 19-year-old goalkeeper Kai McKenzie-Lyle (Barnet FC) who made his debut almost one year ago in the Caribbean Cup game against Suriname in Paramaribo. He also played in the game against Jamaica in Guyana but missed the game against Martinique.Neil Danns, 34, who made his international debut for the Golden Jaguars against Grenada in 2015, will make his return to the team after missing the Caribbean Cup. In his four outings for Guyana, the midfield player Danns scored three goals and is considered an ‘important’ piece for the team.Defender Warren Creavalle who features in the USA’s Major League Soccer (MLS) with the Philadelphia Union, will also be joining the team for another outing with the Golden Jaguars. So too is Englishman Samuel Cox, who usually wears the captain’s armband.Technical Director of the GFF, Ian Greenwood, believes the composition of the squad shows “how serious the GFF is taking this fixture and using it as a building block for 2018 when the CONCACAF League of Nations is officially launched.”The Golden Jaguars begin their encampment in Trinidad and Tobago yesterday and will travel to Grenada tomorrow in preparation for the International Friendly on Saturday.SQUAD: Kai McKenzie-Lyle, Andrew Durant (GK), Adrian Butters, Samuel Cox, Gregory Richardson, Neil Danns, Warren Creavalle, Nicholas Peters, Frank Parks, Jake Newton, Christopher Bourne, Emery Welshman, Shaquille Agard, Curtez Kellman, Anthony Benfield, Maliek De Freitus, Jeremey Garrett, Walter Moore, Terence Vancooten, Cashion London, Sheldon Holder, Ralph Parris and Brandon Beresford.Dover will have former National captain Charles Pollard as his assistant, while Eon DeVeira will serve as the goalkeeper coach, Lyndon France – physical trainer Denzil Hernandez – physiotherapist Trevor Burnett and the team’s manager is Rawle Adams.last_img read more

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Carnegie Mellon’s Sam Benger balances football, diabetes

first_imgSam Benger was 5 years old when a flurry of health anomalies began to worry his parents. After one particularly late night, his father, Stu, began looking up his symptoms.“You start doing the research online, and realize a lot of terrible things could be the cause,” Stu said.Eventually, Stu and Sam’s mother, Beth, decided to drive Sam to to the Boston Children’s Hospital to run tests. Within hours, doctors diagnosed Sam with Type 1 diabetes.“It was kind of scary,” Stu said. “I mean he was 5 (years old).”Sam spent three days in the hospital, where the doctors ran more tests and began getting the family acclimated to what the rest of Sam’s life would entail. Daily blood sugar tests. Daily insulin shots. And if they failed to carefully monitor the condition, a very real possibility of death.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDoctors were quick to tell the family the negatives of the rest of Sam’s life, but nobody told them the positives.Nobody told the family that Sam would become one of the most legendary football players in Hingham High School (Massachusetts) history. Nobody told them that he would eventually be one of the most decorated running backs in all of Division III football, running for over 3,600 career yards and setting multiple program records at Carnegie Mellon University.But through battling his disease, Sam has realized that he doesn’t need other people to tell him what he can and can’t do. He can figure that out himself.“Diabetes shouldn’t be a limiting factor in any way,” Sam said. “You grow to love challenges, because you know they’re events that will strengthen your character and who you are as a person.”It took a while for the daily routine to catch on when Sam was first diagnosed. Since Sam’s pancreas doesn’t create its own insulin, when his blood sugar gets too low, he has to inject himself with insulin to raise his levels back to normal amounts.A few years after the initial diagnosis, doctors transitioned Sam to an insulin pump. The pump automatically injected Sam with insulin, and although he still had to constantly monitor his blood sugar, it made the routine a little easier.Sam also began playing football around the same time in second grade, with Stu as one of the assistant coaches. Stu said that he was initially worried about Sam getting injured, but his fears subsided when he saw how much potential Sam had.“One of the other coaches came up as he was timing sprints, and he was like, ‘look at these times. He’s a whole second faster than anyone else,’” Stu said. “He was a legend here in youth football, and from day one you could just tell that he’s got it.”Hingham is a hockey town, according to Stu, but everybody knew Sam the football player. By the time he was a junior in high school, he had received offers from multiple colleges, including a letter of interest from the staff at now-No. 3 Michigan, which he posted on his Twitter account.“It shows you can do whatever you want to do with diabetes,” Stu said. “It’s one of the things he emphasizes to tell kids that are diagnosed — it doesn’t have to hold you back.”Around the same time, Sam told his family that he had made the decision to be a college student, not a college athlete.He began looking at Ivy League programs and small Division III programs with strong academics, and eventually got an offer from head coach Rich Lackner at CMU.Courtesy of Carnegie Mellon Athletics“I’ve been the head coach for 31 years,” Lackner said. “Those competitive juices that Sam has that he wakes up with every day are something he has day in and day out. He just does everything right all the time.”With the new environment at CMU came new challenges with his diabetes. For the first time in his life, Sam was away from home and his family, the group of people that had supported him throughout his childhood.Sam’s schedule also got tighter. Between classes, homework, practices and games, he said it sometimes was a struggle to find time to monitor his diabetes. Regardless, he has learned to be responsible over the years, and has adapted to life as a college athlete.“It’s like, alright practice is over, I’ve got two or three hours of homework, what can I get in my system?” Sam said. “I’ve grown to really have good control over the diabetes, and it’s something that I think has definitely made me a better person.”He said that careful nutrition is something that most players don’t have to take as seriously as he does, but also something that gives him an advantage over his competitors.Sam was a first team Division III All-American last season, setting the CMU school records for single-season rushing yards, single season touchdowns, single-game rushing yards and single-season yards per game rushing. He has already rushed for 951 yards and 12 touchdowns this season.Sam has developed the pedigree of a ball-hungry, hardworking player, Lackner said, and he refuses to let anything slow him down, even a life-threatening disease that doctors once told him would overshadow him for the rest of his life.“Sam would never use his diabetic condition as a crutch, an excuse or anything of that nature,” Lackner said. “If you came here and didn’t know he was a diabetic, you would never know he was. He knows he has it, he deals with it, and he doesn’t let it hurt his performance at all.” Comments Published on October 19, 2016 at 5:01 pm Contact Matt: mjfel100@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Hopeville: a journey of restoration

first_img7 September 2010 New South African film Hopeville spreads the message that even one person, when they have the courage to take action, can make a big difference in many lives. Shot in Waterval Boven in Mpumalanga province and featuring a stellar cast of local actors, Hopeville is directed by John Trengrove and produced by Curious Pictures, with music by producer/composer Murray Anderson. The film opened at 13 Nu Metro and 20 Ster-Kinekor theatres countrywide, as well as a handful of independent cinemas, on 3 September. MediaClubSouthAfrica Free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service. A new start Amos, a reformed alcoholic, is a man looking for a new start. When he arrives in the fictional town of Hopeville with his estranged son, who has been put into the custody of his father after his mother dies unexpectedly, he faces a tough battle with corrupt officials and an apathetic community. As part of his custody agreement, Amos has promised to encourage his son’s promising swimming career, but the pool in Hopeville contains only garbage and stagnant puddles of water. Amos decides to clean it up for his son’s sake, and the project soon captures the attention and goodwill of the community, who begin to pitch in. The mayor, however, is not pleased because he and his cronies have decided to build a liquor store on the land, and Amos faces fierce resistance, intimidation and threats. He is going to need all his courage, and the support of the residents, if he is to complete the restoration of the pool. A restrained, dignified performance by lead actor Themba Ndaba (Generations) as Amos contrasts with the over-the-top bad guy portrayals of local comedian Desmond Dube (Hotel Rwanda) as the corrupt mayor, and audience favourite Fana Makoena (Generations) as his shady sidekick. “Amos’s journey will touch a lot of people, as we see somebody trying to put things right,” said Ndaba. Others in the cast include Terry Pheto of Oscar-winning Tsotsi fame, Nat Singo (Beat the Drum) as Amos’s son Themba, Jonathan Pienaar (The Lab), and the ever-popular Leleti Khumalo (Invictus, Cry, the Beloved Country). Hopeville tackles contemporary issues of great relevance to South Africans, such as service delivery, social and moral values, crime and corruption, and the relationships of family and friends.Television spin-off Hopeville was inspired by the 2009 television series of the same name, also produced by Curious Pictures. The series producers considered more than 70 locations before settling on the scenic town of Waterval Boven, sitting on the very edge of the escarpment between the high- and low-lying areas of Mpumalanga. The town is popular for fly-fishing, rock-climbing and hiking, and features a number of historical and national monument sites dating back to the days of the Nederlandsche Zuid-Afrikaansch Spoorweg-Maatschappij, which operated in the late 19th century. The film’s cast is largely the same as that of the series, as is the story. NGO Heartlines, in partnership with SABC Education, commissioned the series as part of its work of using television and film to help South Africans strive towards the values of humility, compassion, responsibility, perseverance, and other positive goals, in their lives. The six-episode series aired for the first time in March 2009, and was re-broadcast in September that year. Recently it was nominated for competition in the Rose d’Or, a prestigious international festival featuring the best in entertainment television. The competition takes place every year in Lucerne, Switzerland. Hopeville is one of 110 shows which made it through to the competition round, out of 515 entries submitted. It will compete in the Drama and Mini-series category. Previous winners of the top prize, the Golden Rose, include The Muppet Show (1977), Mr Bean (1990), Little Britain (2005) and The Eternity Man (2009). “What I love about Heartlines’ work is that they allow us to talk about social issues, which opens up dialogues between different people,” said Jonathan Pienaar, who plays Fred Palmer in the series and film. Beautifully filmed and deftly acted, Hopeville will leave audiences inspired to imitate Amos’s actions and do some good in their communities, even if it is something small, without waiting for someone else to step in. First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

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SA doctors perform world’s first successful penis transplant

first_img16 March 2015In a ground-breaking operation, a team of pioneering surgeons from Stellenbosch University (SU) and Tygerberg Hospital performed the first successful penile transplant in the world.The marathon nine-hour operation, led by Prof Andre van der Merwe, head of SU’s Division of Urology, was performed on 11 December 2014 at Tygerberg Hospital in Bellville, Cape Town. This is the second time that this type of procedure was attempted, but the first time in history that a successful long-term result was achieved. WATCH: Prof Andre van der Merwe announces that surgeons at Stellenbosch University performed the first successful penis transplant in the world. This procedure could eventually also be extended to men who have lost their penises from penile cancer or as a last-resort treatment for severe erectile dysfunction due to medication side effects. As part of the study, nine more patients will receive penile transplants.Medical progress“South Africa remains at the forefront of medical progress,” says Prof Jimmy Volmink, Dean of Stellenbosch University’s Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS).“This procedure is another excellent example of how medical research, technical know- how and patient-centred care can be combined in the quest to relieve human suffering. It shows what can be achieved through effective partnerships between academic institutions and government health services.”Van der Merwe was assisted by Prof Frank Graewe, head of the Division of Plastic Reconstructive Surgery at SU FMHS, Prof Rafique Moosa, head of the FMHS Department of Medicine, transplant coordinators, anaesthetists, theatre nurses, a psychologist, an ethicist and other support staff.The patient, whose identity is being protected for ethical reasons, has made a full recovery and has regained all function in the newly transplanted organ.‘Rapid recovery’“Our goal was that he would be fully functional at two years and we are very surprised by his rapid recovery,” says Van der Merwe. The end result of the transplant was the restoration of all the patient’s urinary and reproductive functions.“It’s a massive breakthrough. We’ve proved that it can be done – we can give someone an organ that is just as good as the one that he had,” says Graewe. “It was a privilege to be part of this first successful penis transplant in the world.”“Western Cape Government Health (WCGH) is very proud to be part of this ground- breaking scientific achievement,” says Dr Beth Engelbrecht, head of the WCGH. “We are proud of the medical team, who also form part of our own staff compliment at Tygerberg Hospital.“It is good to know that a young man’s life has been significantly changed with this very complex surgical feat. From experience we know that penile dysfunction and disfigurement has a major adverse psychological effect on people.”Pilot projectThe procedure was part of a pilot study to develop a penile transplant procedure that could be performed in a typical South African hospital theatre setting.“There is a greater need in South Africa for this type of procedure than elsewhere in the world, as many young men lose their penises every year due to complications from traditional circumcision,” explains Van der Merwe.Three years ago the 21-year-old recipient’s penis had to be amputated in order to save his life when he developed severe complications after a traditional circumcision. Although there are no formal records on the number of penile amputations per year due to traditional circumcision, one study reported up to 55 cases in the Eastern Cape alone, and experts estimate as many as 250 amputations per year across the country.Heroes“This is a very serious situation. For a young man of 18 or 19 years the loss of his penis can be deeply traumatic. He doesn’t necessarily have the psychological capability to process this. There are even reports of suicide among these young men,” says Van der Merwe.“The heroes in all of this for me are the donor, and his family. They saved the lives of many people because they donated the heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, skin, corneas, and then the penis,” says Van der Merwe. Finding a donor organ was one of the major challenges of the study.The planning and preparation for the study started in 2010. After extensive research Van der Merwe and his surgical team decided to employ some parts of the model and techniques developed for the first facial transplant.“We used the same type of microscopic surgery to connect small blood vessels and nerves, and the psychological evaluation of patients was also similar. The procedure has to be sustainable and has to work in our environment at Tygerberg,” says Van der Merwe. Source: University of Stellenboschlast_img read more

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Ayodhya case: appellants accuse UP govt of ‘non-neutrality’

first_imgThe Muslim appellants in the Ramjanmabhoomi-Babri Masjid title dispute on Thursday criticised the Uttar Pradesh government for taking a “non-neutral stance” in the Supreme Court.They said the State government had shed its promise of staying neutral in the Ayodhya land dispute.The appellants were referring to arguments before a three-judge Bench led by Chief Justice of India Dipak Misra in the previous hearing.On July 6, Additional Solicitor General (ASG) Tushar Mehta, appearing for the State, strongly objected to the appellants’ persistent plea for the case to be referred to a Constitution Bench.The appellants wanted a Constitution Bench to first decide the question of whether a mosque is essential to Islam. They questioned a line in the 1994 apex court judgment in the Ismail Farooqui case, which says Muslims can pray “anywhere, even in the open”. They argued that Islam would collapse without its mosques to congregate and pray.Mr. Mehta had wondered why the appellants had raised this question eight years after the Ayodhya case came to the Supreme Court in 2010. He submitted that there was something “inherently wrong” with the request.Lashing out on Thursday, senior advocate Rajeev Dhawan, representing the appellants, said Mr. Mehta’s remarks were “uncalled for”.“The non-neutrality of the officer of the State is evident… They have accused one party of lack of bona fide… this is impermissible and a breach of faith,” Mr. Dhavan submitted.He pointed out that the ASG was a law officer of the Centre, which is in fact the ‘Statutory Receiver’ of the area in dispute under the Acquisition of Certain Area at Ayodhya Act of 1993 and thus should have maintained a neutral stance.Mr. Dhawan brushed aside the position taken by Uttar Pradesh Shia Central Waqf Board chairman Syed Waseem Rizvi to settle for a new mosque in a “Muslim-dominated area at a reasonable distance from the most revered place of birth of Maryada Purushottam Sri Ram”.Mr. Rizvi, through his counsel, traced the lineage of the Babri Masjid, which was razed down by karsevaks on December 6, 1992, to Mir Baqi, a Shia noble in Mughal Emperor Babur’s court. He claimed Babri Masjid was a Shia waqf (endowment).“I do not even want to respond to these submissions,” Mr. Dhavan reacted.At one point, Mr. Dhawan sarcastically said the idea of giving up the legal fight now, as suggested by Mr. Rizvi, would amount to an “indulgent act of charity”.last_img read more

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Ceres-Negros faces tough odds vs JDT in AFC Cup semis

first_imgLATEST STORIES Palace: Duterte to hear out security execs on alleged China control of NGCP Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast JDT’s Mexican coach Benjamin Mora knows the Malaysians are in for a dogfight. “We expect a difficult game because the first leg was a tough game,” said Mora. “Ceres is a very good team. They play good football. They are very fast. And they shape very well defensively.”Mora stressed that the two away goals scored by Ceres shouldn’t get in the way of JDT’s play. “I think we must be patient and organized because we lead the 3-2,” said the Mexican. “I know the two away goals may affect if we don’t stay focused and don’t manage the game as we want.”ADVERTISEMENT Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games MOST READ Roach: Pacquiao needs to KO Horn to land big fights A standing-room-only crowd watches Ceres-Negros’ recent match against Malaysia’s Felda United in the AFC Cup. No other place in the country packs as many football fans as Bacolod’s Panaad stadium. —CONTRIBUTED PHOTO / STEPHEN TANBACOLOD CITY – On its home turf, Ceres-Negros has looked unstoppable in the 2017 AFC Cup. But the Busmen face their toughest test yet when they try to overturn a 2-3 deficit against Johor Darul Ta’zim of Malaysia in the second leg of their AFC Cup Asean zonal semifinal tie at Panaad Stadium. ADVERTISEMENT Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’center_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast The Busmen beat Tampines Rovers (5-0) and Hanoi FC of Vietnam (6-2) in the group stage, but the stakes are higher and the opposition is expected to be stronger when the Malaysian champions line up against the home side at 7:30 p.m. “The team is motivated to win so we are not under pressure,” said Ceres coach Risto Vidakovic from Serbia. “I think its a big challenge to play this game and the opportunity also to reach something. It’s a special motivation for us if we can reach the final.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingThere will be no shortage in firepower for the Busmen with first leg goalscorers Fernando Rodriguez and Bienvenido Maranon available for selection, while midfielder Manny Ott, still hurting from a chest injury in the first leg last May 17, is also in the squad to rekindle his battle with JDT talisman Safiq Rahim, who scored in the first leg at Larkin Stadium. With the away goals rule in play, the Philippines Football League side only needs a 1-0 victory over the Malaysian champions to advance to the next round, where they will face the winner of the Home United-Global Cebu tie being played Tuesday night in Singapore. Every 18 seconds someone is diagnosed with HIV Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games BSP survey: PH banks see bright horizon amid dark global recession clouds Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR View commentslast_img read more

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NCAA bans Bolick, 3 others for fracas

first_imgLacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim View comments Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul MOST READcenter_img For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netThe NCAA on Wednesday imposed one-game suspensions on San Beda head coach Boyet Fernandez, Red Lions Robert Bolick and Clint Doliguez, and College of St. Benilde wingman Carlo Young.The three players were involved in an in-game scuffle late in the Red Lions’ 72-58 win on Tuesday.ADVERTISEMENT PGT Asia 2nd leg begins at Splendido LATEST STORIES Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Young went for a takedown that brought Bolick to the floor, igniting a series of ejections that saw Bolick and Doliguez get thrown out with 2:28 remaining in the game.Fernandez, meanwhile, was suspended for his second infraction of “disrespecting game officials.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingBolick was also given a warning by NCAA commissioner Bai Cristobal for the aforementioned offense.The suspension took Bolick out of the running for any individual award including the Most Valuable Player plum. Bolick is currently sixth in the MVP race. —BONG LOZADA, Inquirer.netlast_img read more

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Ind vs WI: Harper rubs Indians the wrong way

first_imgAustralian Daryl Harper, who was at the centre of an umpiring controversy in the first India-West Indies Test in Kingston last month, has drawn criticism for his insensitive remarks about Indian players in a private travelogue-cum-diary.In the diary, he seems to have uncharitably taunted the Indians while admitting some of the errors he made in the June 20-23 match. He has also chided the International Cricket Council (ICC), his employers, for not taking action against India captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni and other unnamed players, who made disparaging remarks against umpiring decisions after India won by 63 runs.Aussie umpire Daryl Harper has hit back over poor umpiring allegations. APHarper, who was officiating in his 95th Test, gave some debatable decisions and admitted them too in his travelogue, titled ‘Getting The Runs… 21 – A postscript from Philadelphia’. The 59-year-old Aussie, in his 28th year as an umpire, also admitted his mistake of failing to notice leg-spinner Devendra Bishoo’s no-ball, off which he dismissed Dhoni in the second innings.”There was one LBW against Harbhajan Singh that would have been reversed had the Decision Review System (DRS) been available. I also failed to detect a no ball when Bishoo’s back foot touched the side or return crease. It’s about as common as Indians eating beef burgers,” wrote the ever-smiling umpire.Harper admits making a second mistake. “Another decision that was notable involved Virat Kohli. He flashed wide of his body at a short ball that passed well outside his body down the leg side. He clearly gloved the ball and was given out. Replays could not confirm that my decision was right… and they could not confirm that my decision was wrong,” he writes.advertisementOn Friday, Harper himself emailed the travelogue to MAIL TODAY, saying that it was the media publication that he was authorising for use. He had earlier e-mailed it only to his family members and friends.Harper also penalised debutant pacer Praveen Kumar by preventing him from bowling for the rest of the first innings, as per the rules, after he repeatedly ran on to the ‘danger area’ of the pitch.When he asked Dhoni to remove him from the attack, the captain, according to Harper, said: “We’ve had issues with you before, Daryl.””Oh dear, I interpreted that comment as meaning that I should just leave them all alone and mind my own business. So, Dhoni and I didn’t exchange any pleasantries for the duration, although I did enjoy telling him that his over rate was down from time to time,” he disclosed.He pointed out that Praveen had played 52 ODIs before his Test debut, so he ought to have known the rules. “I didn’t have my best game of the year but (ICC) referee Jeff Crowe, who observed every ball, calculated that I had managed to get 94 per cent of all my decisions correct.That analysis was confirmed from HQ in our Dubai office,” he wrote.The Indian players’ criticism of umpiring infuriated Harper, an otherwise friendly soul.Although they didn’t take either umpire’s name, lest they should be penalised by the ICC, their target was clearly Harper, who has officiated in 174 One-day Internationals.The ICC media department informed Harper about the negative reports. “One Indian paper claimed that I had made six errors against India; another claimed it was only five. Someone pulled the race card and someone suggested that I had always had it in for the Indians,” he wrote in his 2,342-word travelogue.”The captain was quoted making a derogatory comment about my efforts and an ‘unnamed player’ was quoted as saying that the whole team wanted me out of the action. This was bizarre stuff. Obviously, I should never have applied the laws of cricket to Indian players.”Harper was to officiate in the third Test too – the first one ever that Dominica would host – but he withdrew after the first Test controversies. His contract with the ICC ended on June 30.In the ongoing the three-Test series, the DRS, which assists on-field umpires in giving certain decisions with help of replays, is not being used as the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) doesn’t trust it. Had the DRS been in use, these controversies could have been avoided.Harper also pointed out the low quality cameras that were used and hinted that they contributed to the controversies.He is annoyed with the ICC for ignoring the Indian players’ comments on umpiring.”If someone from the ICC management had shown an ounce of leadership, the referee’s log should have quashed the nonsense immediately,” he said.advertisementA day after the first Test, on June 24, Harper’s became grandfather for the first time when Jack Edward Harper was born to his daughter-in-law Kate and son Tim. That brought a smile to his lips amidst the tension.From the Daryl diaryI failed to detect a no ball when West Indian Bishoo’s back foot touched the side or return crease (in the first Test). It’s about as common as Indians eating beef burgers.Someone pulled the race card and someone suggested that I had always had it in for the Indians.Obviously, I should never have applied the laws of cricket to Indian players.If someone from ICC management had shown an ounce of leadership, the referee’s log should have quashed the nonsense immediately.I correctly answered 96.7 per cent of appeals in the last 10 Tests against India. Of the 10 errors made in those Tests, five went in India’s favour and five went against them.If the ICC was so limp that they couldn’t come to my defence, just as they had never come to my defence on previous issues, then it was time to golast_img read more

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