Governor Wolf Tours Expansion of Iron Workers Training Center, Touts Investments in Apprenticeships

first_img Economy,  Education,  Jobs That Pay,  PAsmart,  Press Release,  Workforce Development Pittsburgh, PA – Governor Tom Wolf joined local officials, employers and members of Iron Workers Local 3 today to tour ongoing renovations of the Iron Workers Training Center in Pittsburgh and discuss apprenticeships and PAsmart. The Wolf Administration provided $750,000 in Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program funding announced in June to help expand the facility and significantly increase the number of apprentices who will be trained.“Western Pennsylvania has more ironworker jobs open than there are skilled workers to fill them,” said Governor Wolf. “I am investing in apprenticeships and job training like this, so we can meet the demand for workers to build the cracker plant, manufacturing facilities, bridges and many other projects that are creating jobs.”The $4.2 million project will upgrade and expand the first floor and add a second floor to the training center, creating more space for hands-on training with modern equipment. The union expects to increase the number of apprentices from approximately 90 last year to more than 300 next year.“Not everyone wants to go to a four-year college, but apprenticeships like this enable workers to earn a good wage while learning at the training center and on the job with an employer,” said Governor Wolf. “These are jobs that can support a family and create a strong workforce that will attract more industry to Pennsylvania.”The starting wage for apprentices in the Iron Worker’s program is $19 per hour, which increases with experience. After the apprenticeship, the starting wage of journeymen is $33 per hour or more, plus benefits.Governor Wolf is expanding apprenticeship opportunities in Pennsylvania. His new and innovative PAsmart initiative will invest $30 million in workforce development. Of that, $7 million will be an increase in apprenticeships with a goal of doubling the number of registered apprentices by 2025. Since Governor Wolf established the commonwealth’s first Apprenticeship and Training Office in 2016, the number of registered apprentices has increased by nearly 20 percent from 13,282 registered apprentices to nearly 16,000.PAsmart also includes a $3 million increase in the successful Industry Partnerships program, which connects similar businesses with educational and economic development partners to provide the job training. An additional $20 million will be invested in education for the rapidly growing fields of science, engineering, math and technology (STEM) and computer science.In July, the governor was joined by business and labor leaders to sign an executive order that cuts red tape, improves coordination between several state agencies and more effectively delivers workforce development services to Pennsylvanians.The executive order places the governor’s private sector policy advisor, the Pennsylvania Workforce Development Board, in a leading role in coordinating job training strategies across the public and private sectors and will provide recommendations on the distribution of the $30 million in PAsmart funding, which will be driven out through a competitive grants process. August 10, 2018 Governor Wolf Tours Expansion of Iron Workers Training Center, Touts Investments in Apprenticeshipscenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Iloilo City to help LGUs affected by Taal eruption

first_imgHe plans to course the financial helpto the provincial government of Batangas for downloading to local governmentsthat badly need help. “I instructed our City Disaster RiskReduction and Management Office (CDRRMO) head Donna Magno to make an assessmentand determine how much we could allot for this,” said Mayor Jerry Treñas. Part of the city government’s QuickResponse Fund may be utilized for this, he added, and he hoped to release thehelp before the Dinagyang Festival next week. Mayor Jerry Treñas. IAN PAUL CORDERO/PN ILOILO City – The city government willhelp local government units (LGUs) affected by the eruption of Taal Volcano inBatangas province. The city mayor said the citygovernment may also be sending masks to Batangas to protect people there frominhaling toxic fumes and ashes from Taal Volcano./PN “As we celebrate the DinagyangFestival in honor of Señor Santo Niño, we should never forget the people inBatangas and nearby provinces suffering due to the volcanic eruption,” said Treñas.“Let us help them.”last_img read more

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Liberia-Nigeria Tighten Bilateral Relations

first_imgLiberia and the Federal Republic of Nigeria have signed agreements meant to benefit both countries.The agreements include cooperation in education, culture, bilateral trade and training of Liberian Foreign Service officers.The two countries also entered into a memorandum of understanding on mining and geology.One of the significant features of the agreements signed is that Nigeria has committed to grant a soon to be agreed number of scholarships to Liberian diplomats to pursue an 18-month Masters in International Relations and Strategic Studies (MISS) program at the University of Lagos.While pursuing their Masters’ degree, Liberian beneficiaries of the Nigerian scholarships would also take courses at the Nigerian Foreign Service Academy.Speaking ahead of the signing ceremony, Liberia’s Foreign Minister Augustine K. Ngafuan gave special recognition to experts from both countries that worked behind the scenes to make the signing of the agreements a reality.Minister Ngafuan said the signing of the Joint agreements is a giant step forward in consolidating Liberia-Nigeria relations.“We at Foreign Affairs are the diplomats and have done our part by enhancing the relationship; we are now expecting implementation, which means our sector ministries and experts would coordinate more through direct communication and follow up on issues of mutual concern as it relates to the successful implementation of the various agreements.”He said if the ministries and sectors in both countries forge closer partnerships, it will ensure success while the Foreign Ministry in both countries will continue to nudge their respective ministries and agencies in taking the concrete steps that would ensure the achievement of the objectives laid down in the agreements.He spoke of the huge investment potential in Liberia and urged the Nigerian private sector to take advantage of what he called “the first mover advantages.”The Foreign Minister said both countries deliberated on education related matters and accordingly signed an agreement that will further concretize the already good collaboration of the two countries in the sector.Nigeria agreed to continue the Technical Assistance Cooperation (TAC) Scheme wherein Nigeria regular field teachers render critically needed services in the Liberian school system.An agreement that will facilitate the training of Liberian Foreign Officers in the Nigerian Foreign Service Academy was also signed during the Joint Commission meeting in Abuja with both countries also agreeing to reinforce the subsisting agreement on the Technical Aid Corps Scheme.The Session recognized trade as an essential and indispensable component in the deepening and broadening of relations between Nigeria and Liberia, and resolved to facilitate trade and commerce by removing all impediments that militate against free trade including putting in place measures and structures that would enhance commerce and people to people contact.In order to enhance relations in the Cultural sector and recognize the importance of promoting cultural values in both countries, Nigeria and Liberia signed an Agreement on Cultural Cooperation that will promote cooperation between the public and private cultural institutions in both countries.Mindful of the enormous opportunities that abound in the mining sectors of both countries and the comparative advantage of Liberia in the sector, both countries agreed to explore ways of making positive intervention in the sector.Meanwhile, the two countries agreed on further consultations on the MOUs on Immigration, Drugs, Science and Technology, Agriculture and Sustainable Development, Health and Medical Sciences as well as Transport and Civil Aviation.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Who’s to blame for wildfires?

first_imgTrue, the FBI early in the summer circulated a memo to the effect that an al-Qaida operative in custody claimed to be the mastermind of a plot to start forest fires in Colorado, Montana, Wyoming and Utah – from the locations perhaps while he was on vacation. The tactic of starting forest fires is hardly an original idea. The Japanese tried it in World War II, and it didn’t work for them. And all the talk of administration-sanctioned torture – sorry, “enhanced interrogation techniques” – makes all such admissions suspect. Did our al-Qaida operative also confess to being the Lindbergh baby and kidnapping Judge Crater? Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid advanced this explanation: “One reason we have the fires in California is global warming.” Having got off that shot at President Bush, who is the antichrist to the climate- change people, he later backed off that assertion. CNN eased right up to blaming global warming, but mainly it seemed to promo a series of theirs called “Planet in Peril.” (Hmm. Wonder where they come out on that issue.) One explanation taking shape on the Internet and call-in talk shows is breathtaking in its own way: The wildfires are somehow the fault of the people who live there; they brought it on themselves. Not everybody, mind you, just the people in Malibu. The argument starts something like this: “Well, nobody made them live in a place that’s prone to mudslides, wildfires and earthquakes.” This is true of a lot of California, but what the caller really means is that the residents are rich, famous, have fabulous houses with ocean views, drive fancy cars and generally have it coming to them. The call typically winds up in the spirit of generosity, “And, anyway, they can afford to rebuild.” Let’s take a slightly higher road. If somebody gave you a beachfront house in Malibu, would you live there knowing that one day it might burn down and you’d be back living in the trailer park? Darn right. Dale McFeatters is a Washington-based editorial writer and columnist for Scripps Howard News Service. His e-mail address is mcfeattersd@shns.com.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! By Dale McFeatters We are always cautioned against the “blame game,” but in truth it is one of America’s favorite pastimes. We can’t accept that bad things simply happen. No, sir; somebody – or something – had to be responsible. When Florida was being racked by hurricanes, some loopy preachers blamed the bad weather on gays, godlessness and abortion rights. None of this talk about thermoclines and isobars and cyclical storm activity for them. And when Katrina hit, the Bush White House knew instantly whom to blame for New Orleans being underwater: corrupt local Democrats. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.But a scapegoat has yet to emerge for the Southern California wildfires that have displaced about a half-million people, done immense property damage and sent, because of the lurid visuals, cable-TV reporters into paroxysms of something akin to sexual ecstasy. There has been a paucity of political blame, probably because the fires have incinerated liberal Democratic and conservative Republican precincts alike. Given the proximity of the fires to the Mexican border, I thought for sure the blame would fall on every aspiring politician’s favorite issue: illegal immigrants. However, illegal immigrants don’t seem to figure into the story, except that some of them may have been trapped and killed by the fast-moving inferno. It will be interesting to see where the localities stand on illegal immigrants when the fires finally are put out and a plentiful supply of cheap, semi-skilled labor is needed to rebuild and replant. For disasters that could be humanmade, terrorism is always a quick and simple early explanation, even if it’s only offered to be retracted later. But the terrorists have been conspicuously absent from official speculation, perhaps because there’s no election this fall. last_img read more

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