Developers dish out thousands of dollars in gifts to secure the deal

first_imgSavvy house and land buyers are saving thousands with incentive gifts being offered by big developers.SAVVY house and land buyers are saving thousands of dollars on their homes, taking advantage of dollar incentives that big developers are throwing their way.Big name developers such as AVID Property Group, Stockland and builders like Clarendon Homes are tapping into the market offering thousands of dollars in extra incentives for those willing to seal the deal.From gift cards, to monthly giveaways or furniture packages, AVID Property Group general manager Bruce Harper said savvy buyers were taking advantage of the deals and coming out on top.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor7 hours ago“We understand breaking into the housing market can be challenging and the difference these types of incentives make to buyers looking for affordable homes that still meet their needs,” Mr Harper said.AVID Property Group is offering buyers at their Brentwood Forest estate in Bellbird Park a $5,000 Visa gift card when purchasing blocks of land or freehold house and land packages from its Temp Living range, while Stockland is giving away a $10,000 Visa gift card to buyers who purchase a SoLa townhome in their North Lakes development.Mr Harper said the developer had chosen to give away gift cards because it allowed buyers to spend the money how they chose.“Combined with the fact Ipswich is a booming region, incentives like this provide an additional leg up for buyers wanting to break into the market,” he said.Clarendon Homes are using a different technique running with a 21 Summers officer, with heavily discounted airconditioning, floors, exterior packs and upgrades for just $21 saving buyers thousands of dollars in extras.Combine the developers incentives with the first homebuyer grant of $20,000 and those new to the housing market can be laughing all the way to their new front door.last_img read more

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Police rule at Boyce and Jefford Relay Festival

first_imgDavin Fraser closed off the day’s activities as the Guyana Police Force (GPF) athletics club teams ran away with most of the spoils at the Boyce and Jefford Relay Festival and Family Fun Day at the Police Sports Club Ground, yesterday.On a day loaded with excitement, however, it was Walter Grant- Stuart’s win in the men’s 5000m cycle race that really got the crowd animated as they unanimously backed the one-handed cyclist.The differently-abled athlete started out with a 200m head start over his competiters, and that was more than what he needed as he maintained the lead throughout the race.As he gained momentum and began lapping a number of his opponents the crowd became even more enthusiastic to see him succeed and many rose to their feet as they cheered him on, breaking out in resounding applause after he rode down his final lap and took the win.In the men’s 4x100m, Kevin Abbensettes,who ran the second leg, ran the race of his life as he established Police in the lead, taking over after a sharp start from Stephon Boodie. On the third leg, Linton Mentis simply needed to preserve that lead, paving the way for Davin Fraser to bring home an easy win.Differently-abled cyclist Walter Grant- Stuart gunning in the lead of the men’s 5000m race at yesterday’s Boyce and Jefford Relay Festival (Samuel Maughn photo)The second place went to Super Upcoming Runners (SUR) ‘A’ team, and the Mercury Fast Laners (MFL) boys took the third place.The preceding women’s 4x100m was just another opportunity for Police to dominate, with Police ‘A’ team taking first place, and Police ‘B’ ending with third place. The SUR women team of Tiffauna Garnett, Alicia Vanderhyden, Cassie Tixie and Cassie Small finished in third place.Running out of lane three, Police’A’started off with Kezia Bess handing over to Tandika Eastman, who blazed ahead of the pack on the straight.Coming around the turn the team depended on Shauncel Adams to sustain the lead and she did not let them down.With Alita Moore on the final straight the team had no problem closing off with a gapping win ahead of SUR. Cassie Small ended for SUR, while the team also had Tiffauna Garnett, Alicia Vanderhyden, and Cassie Tixie.The Police ‘B’ team started off with Cindy Fraser, while Tasnica Lovell ended, and Tandika Burgess and Shauncel Adams completed the team.Police also had the female distance medley, the 4x200m mixed, and the male and female sprint medley relay wins. The men’s sprint medley in particular had the packed crowd thrilled as Police dug deep and climbed from third to emerge victorious.Tyrell Peters gave SUR a power start that made them seem almost certain for the win of that 1500m medley relay, but Police still had a card up their sleeve. It was Quacy Morian on the final 800m leg that really pulled the team through, as he closed in on SUR’s Ronaldo Thomas almost 50m lead, and took him down by the first 300m in.Another 300m and Thomas was almost at risk of even losing the second place finish as UG’s Salim Yussuf challenged him on the turn. But Yussuf had nothing left in him to fight with on the final straight, leaving the second place for SUR, and seeing UG finishing in third place.last_img read more

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USS Midway played critical role in rescue missions throughout U.S. history

first_img Published on November 7, 2012 at 1:48 am Contact Jesse: jcdoug01@syr.edu | @dougherty_jesse Facebook Twitter Google+ Related Stories All hands on deck: Syracuse, San Diego State work to make Battle on the Midway once-in-a-lifetime eventcenter_img On April 30, 1975, North Vietnamese forces overtook Saigon, the capital of South Vietnam. Immediately, thousands of at-risk Vietnamese joined a large number of Americans who needed to be evacuated from the area.In the wake of chaos, Operation Frequent Wind ensued.The U.S. Navy enlisted seven ships to conduct the evacuation process, and among those ships was the USS Midway.The Midway, constructed just after World War II, was called upon for its uncanny size. The ship alone rescued more than 3,000 Saigon refugees in less than 48 hours, which would later be recognized as the largest humanitarian mission in U.S. naval history.On Sunday, the Syracuse men’s basketball team will open its season against San Diego State in the Battle on the Midway in San Diego. The game will take place on the flight deck of the USS Midway, the very ship that saved thousands of lives on that dark, April day.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textFrom 1945 to 1955, the USS Midway was the largest ship in the world. In 47 years, from 1945 to 1992, it became the longest commissioned U.S. Navy carrier of the 20th century. When the ship opened as a museum in 2004, it attracted over 1 million visitors, the most of any museum in the world.The Battle on the Midway is the first-ever sporting event the vessel will host.“We’re not a sports venue, obviously. We are a naval aviation museum,” said Scott McGaugh, the marketing director for the USS Midway museum. “But to have a game here where the proceeds benefit military veterans is fitting.”McGaugh, a native of the San Diego area, has written three books and has appeared on the History Channel to discuss the Midway. He said the ship is better known for humanitarian missions than its role in actual military combat.“The ship spent less than 10 percent of its total life in combat,” McGaugh said. “It’s famous for its humanitarian missions, and that is something that we are particularly proud of.”Beyond the countless missions, the Midway is widely known for its outlandish size. The ship weighs nearly 70,000 tons, has a height equal to a 20-story building, a width of greater than 250 feet and a length of just more than 1,000 feet. The flight deck, where the basketball game will be played, covers an area of 4.02 acres.Jim Nash, the museum’s docent program manager, is in charge of the education of museum visitors, and often interacts with the large historical artifact. Nash said the Midway’s size has earned it a nickname in San Diego.“The ship is called a ‘city at sea’ because everything you would find in a city in America you would find on board,” Nash said. “We have our own post office, own little stores, our own barbershop, restaurants, a tailor and cobbler shop, and more.”On a single voyage, 4,500 men served on the Midway, and over the ship’s lifetime more than 225,000 would call it home for extended periods of time. The average age of Midway crewmembers, 19, is younger than every player on Syracuse’s roster, aside from freshman forward Jerami Grant.As for what this game means for the city of San Diego, McGaugh said the event is about more than two college basketball teams.“This is the birthplace of naval aviation, about 500 yards from where the boat sits today,” McGaugh said. “We have people asking to play games here all the time, but we pass on those opportunities.“But to bring in a nationally ranked Syracuse and have this connection between military and the city of San Diego, we had to do it.”The ship’s historian Karl Zingheim echoed McGaugh’s excitement for the historic event.“It is a unique pleasure to host this game,” Zingheim said. “And I am sure it will be truly memorable for everyone.” Commentslast_img read more

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