Conboy and cabinet host student town hall, provide campus updates

first_imgThe Student Affairs Office — in coordination with College President Katie Conboy and her cabinet — hosted a virtual town hall for students Thursday evening. The event was the first in a series of panels designed to give Belles updates about the upcoming semester on campus.Interim vice president for student affairs Gloria Jenkins began the evening by introducing President Conboy, who expressed her hope that students were gearing up to return to campus.“We want you to know we’re thinking about you, and we’ve missed you on campus,” she said. “We hope you had a great holiday season, and … that the break has been restful and has given you a chance to reflect to on things that are important to you at the College. We also hope you’re getting a little restless to leave home and get back to us.”Conboy also took the opportunity to introduce her cabinet to students who might not be familiar with those who hold leadership positions at the College. New members include interim vice president for mission Dr. Molly Gower and interim vice president for college relations Libby Koultourides.Vice president for enrollment management Mona Bowe reminded students of the importance of pre-matriculation testing procedures.“We really feel that the closest we can get to starting the semester with zero COVID cases on campus, the higher the likelihood that we’ll be able to complete the semester successfully,” she said.Bowe also cautioned students not to take their PCR test more than a week before their scheduled move-in date.“A quick reminder: If you ask for a test kit from Global 7 … hold on to that test kit, until seven days before you’re scheduled to move in,” Bowe said. “You don’t want to test too early.”According to Bowe, all information regarding testing will be posted and updated on the Saint Mary’s Live Learn Work website.Bowe also announced that surveillance testing will start for students approved for early move in the week of Jan. 25. All other students with regular move in times will enter the surveillance testing pool the week of Feb. 8.College official Shari Rodriguez informed students that the same health and safety practices will continue to be in place for the spring semester.“We were able to stay together and to finish [last] semester together because of your incredible work and your ability to follow some of the best guidelines that we have — check up, mask up, wash up and backup,” Rodriguez said. “So, all together, we were able to complete the semester successfully and we are going to adopt those same practices and keep them going.”Bowe added that requirements for social gatherings will also initially remain the same as the fall semester.Provost and Senior Vice President Titi Ufomata urged students to finish registering for classes so the College can make the necessary adjustments to seating.In addition, Ufomata described the academic modalities that will be in place for the spring semester.“Most of our classes will be taught using the modified face to face,” Ufomata said. “Some classes [will be] hybrid … and then the third modality is online. As we did last semester, even with the online courses, the faculty will make sure to tune in and contact you directly at least weekly.”Ufomata also emphasized that all student services will be available for students to use.Jenkins informed students that the College is working to create spaces for students to safely gather during the winter.“We’re looking to create a winter space for you — something like was created for you for the fall and the beginning of the school year,” she said. “There’s the possibility that we may have ice skating, we’re looking into that. We’re looking for ways for you to make use of the snow that might come our way, walking around campus when there’s snow or it’s cold [and] trying to find ways to make that fun.”The Cabinet also announced details for upcoming campus events.Executive Director of Inclusion and Equity Redgina Hill spoke about a virtual celebration to commemorate Martin Luther King Jr. next Monday at 2 p.m. ET.In addition, Koultourides explained the upcoming 24-Hour Donor Challenge on Feb. 25.“Thousands of alumnae, parents, friends from all over the country and really all over the world, [will] show their support for Saint Mary’s and for all of you, so keep your eyes out,” she said. “We’ll have emails coming out to you and announcements on how you can be involved, and some fun things that will be happening.”Director of Athletics Julie Schroeder-Biek told students that they can use the Angela Fitness Center as soon as they are cleared to return to campus by the Health and Counseling Center.“Students, once you are cleared by Health and Counseling, we welcome you guys back to join us in the fitness center if you’d like,” she said. “Right now, we’re doing 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. And then when you guys get back, we’re going to throw in some afternoon hours to just so you have a little bit more range. We’re thinking about 4:30 p.m.to 6:30 p.m., along with 11:00 a.m. to 1 p.m.”At the end of the town hall, the cabinet took questions from students.Responding to an inquiry about new coronavirus strains, Bowe assured students that the College will align with all safety guidelines to recommendations from local health officials.“We do know that [the new strain] has proven to be a little bit more challenging because it can be spread a lot faster, so we will maintain all the protocols we put in place on sanitation and cleaning between classes on public areas,” Bowe said. “If at any point in time the county the state or the CDC changed their recommendations to make them stronger, we will follow those as well.”Vice president for strategy and planning Dana Strait fielded questions about campus dining in the new semester.Strait noted that all safety protocols in the dining hall will remain the same, but the College is looking into heating outdoor dining venues. In addition, the College will soon provide students details to new Campus Dining enhancements.“We’re very close to activating GrubHub for our own campus so that you could use your flex points to order from the cafe, and then swing by and pick it up so you don’t have to wait in line which we felt was really important especially under COVID conditions,” Strait said. “We have an ID machine, that is already been installed on campus, so we don’t have issues with your ID cards like we did last semester. … And then lastly, there will be an expansion of the Belles at Home program so those meals that could be picked up and cooked elsewhere, so that they are more available, not just for on campus students with kitchens, but also for students who are off campus.”According to Strait, Murphy’s and Spes Unica Cafes will remain closed until the fall, but new menu options are being explored at each location.Tags: COVID-19, Dana Strait, Gloria Jenkins, Julie Schroeder-Biek, Libby Koultourides, Molly Gower, pre-matriculation testing, president katie conboy, Redgina Hill, Spring 2021, surveillance testing, Titilayo Ufomatalast_img read more

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Vermont Tourism Reports Strong Winter Season

first_imgVermont Tourism ReportsStrong Winter Season According to the Department ofTourism and Marketing, tax revenue collected for Rooms and Meals is showingthat this year’s snowy winter has been a good season for Vermont’stourism industry. Rooms and Meals tax revenue generated during December,January and February is up $2.08 million (6.94 percent) over the previouswinter season, and $1.73 million (5.67 percent) over the same period two yearsago. The National Weather Servicein Burlington reported December as the fourth-snowiest on record, and thatFebruary had its snowiest month ever with 42.3 inches, beating the previousrecord of 34.3 inches set in 1958. In December, the Vermont Ski AreasAssociation had its highest percentage of early season terrain open in eightyears. “The winter season hasbeen tremendously successful for our ski areas and local businesses that rely onVermont’s tourism economy,” said Governor Jim Douglas. “Manyof Vermont’s ski resorts, Nordic centers and snowmobiling trails remainedopen through mid-April with excellent conditions, giving local businesses alate-season boost during what is traditionally a quiet time in Vermont.” MONTPELIER, Vt. — Vermont is wrapping up one of its best winterseasons in recent memory, thanks to an ideal combination of significant andpersistent snowfall that drew millions of visitors here to enjoy a variety ofrecreational activities.  A handful of ski areas arestill open, and the Vermont Association of Snow Travelers closed itssnowmobiling trails for the season on April 16. VAST’s entire 6,200-milesnowmobiling trail network opened for the season on December 16, and the saleof VAST trail passes increased from 27,000 during the 2006-07 season to 32,000during the 2007-08 season.center_img “We’ve had anincredible winter season that’s still going strong,” said Tourismand Marketing Commissioner Bruce Hyde. “The amount of snow we’vereceived since December has certainly been a terrific boon to theindustry.” “The winter skiseason has been phenomenal,” said Parker Riehle, president ofSki Vermont, the Vermont Ski Areas Association. “The season wasmarked by not only record snowfall, but with timing that was just perfectbecause every weekend and key holiday period started with a fresh blanket ofsnow with exhilarated skiers and riders close behind everysnowstorm.  And, with so much snow still in the mountains, several skiareas will be open well into late April.” Visitors make 13.4 milliontrips to Vermont each year and visitor spending adds an estimated $1.57 billionto the state’s economy, according to VDTM research. The research showsthat 28.3 percent of those visits, or 3.8 million, are during the winterseason. ###last_img read more

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From Bankruptcy, Stronger Coal Industry Rivals

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Dan Lowrey for SNL:Publicly traded U.S. coal producers that have managed to stay afloat amid stricter regulations, cheap natural gas and warmer weather, now face the additional challenge of rivals emerging from restructuring relieved of debt burdens and operating at lower costs.While that will toughen competition, analysts say most firms that avoided bankruptcy court so far are likely to continue to avert it at least in the short term.Moody’s senior credit analyst Anna Zubets-Anderson told S&P Global Market Intelligence that remaining publicly traded coal producers are rated by Moody’s as “at risk,” but that because their debt loads are less than the major producers in bankruptcy, most of them are unlikely to file bankruptcy this year.Beyond an extremely challenging operating environment, she said, they face the prospect of larger competitors emerging from bankruptcy court with a streamlined capital structure and a far more manageable debt load. “Part of the problem is that companies that emerge from Chapter 11 will have smaller debt burdens,” she said. “Those that filed will come out in a better position to compete,” leaving those that haven’t filed “disadvantaged.”Full article ($): Remaining publicly traded coal miners to face a leaner competition From Bankruptcy, Stronger Coal Industry Rivalslast_img read more

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Uruguayan Navy Implements Moodle System for Distance Education

first_img In its academic courses, the Uruguayan Navy has begun to make use of the Moodle system, a platform that enables the development of distance-education formats and the establishment of interpersonal relationships between students and teachers and that generates a space for the analysis and discussion of academic and professional issues. At this time, the technology is being applied to the delivery of three courses: research methodology, individual research, and teacher training, which trains instructors to improve their performance in the Comprehensive System of Naval Education. The Naval War College (Escuela de Guerra Naval) plans to implement this platform gradually, with a major qualitative leap being the delivery of the Command Course, which is taken by lieutenants for promotion to lieutenant commander and is now fully functional through the exchange of emails between students and teachers. This system will permit the Uruguayan Navy to move to the forefront of the educational changes underway around the world. At the same time, officers will be able to receive a higher-quality and more practical education, since they will not have to attend in person all the classes held at the War College. By Dialogo August 11, 2011last_img read more

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Weathered Thread hosts Christmas showcase for vendors

first_imgThe showcase will be taking place every Saturday and Sunday from now until Christmas. Since the shop wasn’t able to hold the showcase this year due to the pandemic, the Weathered Thread wanted to find a safe way to accommodate everyone, both vendors and shoppers alike, who wanted to take part in shopping local. WHITNEY POINT (WBNG) — The Weathered Thread held a Christmas Creator Showcase for some of their vendors this weekend to support local artists and just in time for Small Business Saturday. Usually, The Weathered Thread hosts a Christmas Showcase featuring a number of vendors who sell their products for the holidays. The Weathered Thread is a shop in Whitney Point that sells home decor, furniture, and unique gifts. center_img “We have six in house folks who do various things for us: furniture, soaps,” Peterson said. “They’re all locally based and as part of our general business plan that was always super, super important.”  This year, the updated showcase includes about five to six different artisans that create candles, signs, and furniture.  Owner of The Weathered Thread, Aubrey Peterson, says it was important to still have the showcase in some capacity because her business is built on the foundation of supporting other small-business creators. last_img read more

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Reading 0 – 3 Preston

first_imgReading remain three points clear at the top of the Sky Bet Championship table despite falling to a 3-0 defeat at home to Preston.Although Preston dominated the first half, Reading went closest to breaking the deadlock through a header from top scorer Lucas Joao.- Advertisement – Reading had won seven of their opening eight league matches but lost their unbeaten record in a 3-2 defeat away to Coventry last Friday.- Advertisement –  Image:Scott Sinclair celebrates scoring the opener for Preston Preston’s Daniel Johnson missed a penalty soon after half-time but two goals in a four-minute spell – from Scott Sinclair and Emil Riis Jakobsen – put paid to Reading’s hopes.The visitors added a third goal through Brad Potts in stoppage time to confirm their superiority. Preston opened brightly, forcing Reading to defend in numbers to protect goalkeeper Rafael.Potts found space on the edge of the home area but his weak effort failed to trouble Rafael as it drifted wide.Reading tried to threaten going forward but a promising move down the left flank ended with Preston ‘keeper Declan Rudd comfortably catching an Omar Richards cross.Preston continued to dominate, with Alan Browne off target with a 25-yard free-kick that flew narrowly over the crossbar.Jakobsen then shot across the face of the home goal after cutting in from the left wing.Approaching the interval, Reading finally made progress in attack.Rudd made a superb save to keep out Joao’s close-range header from a Sone Aluko cross.Soon after, Rudd was in action again to block Aluko’s firm shot at his near post.Preston could have gone ahead four minutes into the second period, when Reading defender Tom McIntyre clumsily fouled Jakobsen in the area.But Johnson, usually reliable from the spot, produced a tame penalty – after a laboured run-up – that Rafael saved with ease.Joao twice missed good opportunities to add to his nine-goal tally this season and Preston made sure he paid for his wastefulness.Sinclair touched in his fifth goal of the campaign past Rafael in the 64th minute, despite looking in a suspiciously offside position.And, four minutes later, Jakobsen got the better of a sluggish McIntyre to run towards Rafael before slotting home with precision.Reading rallied near the end but Potts slotted home Preston’s third in the 92nd minute after a fast break and pass from Tom Barkhuizen.What the managers said…Reading’s Veljko Paunovic: “I’m not disappointed but I feel the pain. When you lose a game, you have to absorb it. That’s what I told the players. You have to quickly bounce back and convert the pain into a positive energy for the next game.“The next game is all we have. If we lose or we win, we say – next day, next game. We have to acknowledge that we weren’t at our best today.”Preston’s Alex Neil: “This seems to be quite common for us on the road. We’ve been excellent on the road. First of all, I’m delighted with the win. But I’m still a bit perplexed at how poor we’ve been at home in comparison to being away. But we’ll enjoy tonight. We needed a good response from the players after the last two games, which have been tough for us at home.“The one thing that we have never lacked is spirit, endeavour and effort. And tonight I thought that we added a bit of quality to that. I thought that when we missed the penalty, that galvanised us a little bit. And once we got the first goal, that was really the key. Reading then came at us a bit more but we then really damaged them with our transition play and counter-attacks.” They were, though, on a 100 per cent league run at Madejski Stadium this term – four wins out of four, seven goals scored and none conceded.In contrast, Preston had lost all five games at home this season – collecting all their 10 points on the road.After a 2-2 draw at Norwich, they had picked up successive victories at Brentford, QPR and Huddersfield.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Drinks retailer brewing out-of-town schemes

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PREMIUM‘Stop prosecuting sex trafficking victims!’: Activists lambaste Gerindra lawmaker

first_imgFacebook LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Google Forgot Password ? Topics : Log in with your social account Linkedin Gerindra-Party Sex-trafficking sex-workers Padang west-sumatra house-of-representatives Rights activists have urged the West Sumatra Police to stop their legal process against NN, a sex worker currently facing criminal charges after allegedly being entrapped by a lawmaker from the Gerindra Party, Andre Rosiade, in a hotel room in Padang last month, pointing out that the she is actually a victim of unaddressed human trafficking in Indonesia.The director of the Padang Legal Aid Institute (LBH Padang), Wendra Rona Putra, who represents NN in the case, explained that the 27-year-old single mother was involved in prostitution because she struggled to make a living to support her 2-year-old child in a city far from her home in West Java.”NN moved to Padang with her aunt to avoid her abusive partner and eventually became a sex worker to make ends meet,” Wendra said recently.He added that NN did not work alone, but had a manager, aka a pimp, who had allegedly …last_img read more

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LPFA’s managing director lands CEO role

first_imgThe London Pensions Fund Authority (LPFA) has named managing director Robert Branagh as chief executive officer.Branagh joined LPFA in April 2018, replacing Mike Allen who retired. Former CEO Susan Martin had moved on to join Local Pensions Partnership (LPP) in 2016, an LPFA spokesman clarified.He added that the authority was then run through the roles of managing director and chair, with no CEO. He said the announcement is a change of structure, which “effectively (re)creates the role of CEO of LPFA”.The appointment follows the recruitment of LPFA’s management team, which now includes Peter Ballard, director of funding and risk, Morenike Ajayi, commercial and finance director, and Alistair Peck, member engagement and communications, the statement said. Ballard – who has worked for trustee, not for profit, private equity owned, and insurance businesses for the last 30 years – joined the £6.1bn (€7.3bn) local government pension scheme (LGPS) in February and is responsible for overseeing all aspects of the fund’s funding policy, investment strategy, and employer covenant assessment.Ajayi joined last September, while Peck started in November, he confirmed.As for Branagh’s appointment, John Preston, who was named LPFA chair in January, said: “Robert’s new role reflects the next stage in the LPFA’s evolution.”He added that Branagh would also “lead on developing the LPFA’s strategic direction, supporting collaboration across the LGPS sector and raising our profile – particularly relating to our responsible investment and sustainability aspirations – across the industry”.The appointments also follow the successful conclusion of pooling by LPP and the setting out of a new strategic direction for both the pool and the fund over the next three to five years, LPFA stated.The LPFA, with over 90,000 members, 142 actively contributing employer, together with Lancashire County Council, is a shareholder of LPP – a pensions service provider for LGPS and other public sector pension funds.last_img read more

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Faroe plans Rungne spud for September. Targets 70 mmboe

Faroe Petroleum is preparing to spud its Rungne exploration well in the North Sea, offshore Norway.Transocean Arctic rig/ Image by Marcusroos, under Public Domain licenseIn an operational statement on Wednesday, Faroe said the well is expected to spud in September 2018, using the Transocean Arctic semi-submersible drilling rig.According to Faroe, the unrisked gross resources targeted are c. 70 mmboe.Worth noting, the Norwegian Petroleum Safety Authority on Wednesday said it had granted permission to Faroe for the use of the Transocean Arctic rig.However, what is interesting in the PSA announcement, is that the spud date there has been set for October, and not September. PSA said the drilling would last around 44 days, depending on whether a find is made.Following the completion of the drilling, regardless of the exact spud date, Faroe will move the rig to its Brasse East well, hoping to add further incremental reserves to the existing 2P reserves of 30.7 mmboe (net to Faroe) for the planned Brasse field development. The unrisked gross resources targeted are 12.5 mmboe.Faroe Petroleum’s production averaged 12,402 boepd in the first half of 2018.Offshore Energy Today Staff read more

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