Dzeko’s late winner rescues Roma against lowly Frosinone

first_imgDzeko had equalised after a nightmare start for the visitors in windy conditions and also provided the assist for Lorenzo Pellegrini’s 31st-minute goal.Roma are fifth, one point behind AC Milan, who beat Empoli 3-0 on Friday to remain in the final Champions League berth.“I prefer a different way of getting to the three points,” admitted coach Eusebio Di Francesco.“We made a lot of errors and that almost cost us. The positive thing is we fought until the very end to win.”Camillo Ciano had gotten Frosinone off to a dream start, intercepting a blundering Steven Nzonzi pass, with Roma goalkeeper Robin Olsen making a mess of the attempt to clear.Bosnian star Dzeko got the equaliser on the half hour, sneaking up on napping defender Edoardo Goldaniga to finish off.A minute later the visitors were back in front as Dzeko set up Stephan El Shaaraway with Marco Sportiello tipping the first effort wide with Pellegrini on hand to pounce on the rebound.Roma defender Kostas Manolas came off with an ankle injury, with Andrea Pinamonti throwing Frosinone a lifeline off a Ciano cross nine minutes from time.But as Frosinone looked set for a share of the points Dzeko bundled in the winner following good work from Daniele De Rossi and an El Shaarawy assist.“I prefer a different way of getting to three points,” said AS Roma coach Eusebio Di Francesco © AFP / Andreas SOLARO“We can’t keep getting away with this type of performance,” said Di Francesco.“I was impressed not just by Dzeko’s goals, but the way he tried to pull the team forward and lead the way on the pitch.”Roma needed a win to hold off the chasing pack, with Lazio, Torino and Atalanta now six points adrift.Next week Roma play city rivals Lazio, and have their Champions League last 16, second leg clash with FC Porto on March 6.– Torino spark –Torino earlier joined the crowded race for European football with Armando Izzo and Iago Falque scoring either side of the break to beat ambitious Atalanta 2-0.Izzo slotted in three minutes before the interval with Falque blasting in the second just after the restart as Torino move seventh, equal on 38 points with Lazio and Atalanta.Walter Mazzarri’s side extended their run of games without conceding a goal to five, a feat they last achieved 24 years ago.Torino defender Armando Izzo scored his third league goal this season © AFP / Miguel MEDINAAtalanta are losing pace after once looking contenders for Champions League football, suffering a second consecutive defeat following last weekend’s 3-1 home loss to AC Milan.The side from Bergamo had been riding high after ousting champions Juventus from the Coppa Italia quarter-finals last month.“We were practically perfect in the second half,” said Mazzarri.“The next three rounds are the real test of our maturity and then we’ll see if this Toro really has become a great team.”Fiorentina will look to join Lazio, Torino and Atalanta on 38 points when they take on third-placed Inter Milan in Sunday’s late game.Champions Juventus, who have a 13-point lead at the top, travel to struggling Bologna in search of a boost after their 2-0 Champions League last 16, first leg defeat at Atletico Madrid during the week.Napoli, in second, play at mid-table Parma.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Bosnian forward Edin Dzeko has scored seven league goals this season. © AFP / Alberto PIZZOLIROME, Italy, Feb 24 – Edin Dzeko snatched a 95th-minute winner for a double on the night as Roma rescued a 3-2 come-from-behind win against lowly Frosinone on Saturday to keep in touch with the Champions League places.The Romans were pushed hard by Frosinone, a team also from the Lazio region who are second from bottom of the league, with just three wins this season.last_img read more

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Milan Mandaric: Leicester’s Thai owners are proud people – they’re not sellers!

first_imgMilan Mandaric believes the key to Leicester City’s stunning Premier League title win was ‘having a team of brothers’.And the former Foxes chief insists the club’s current Thai owners will do everything in their power to resist selling off their top stars this summer.Leicester have completed arguably the greatest shock in sporting history by beating the Premier League’s richest teams to the top flight crown – with the side set to lift the trophy after their final home game of the season against Everton on Saturday.The Foxes’ incredible title bid may have been sparked by the arrival of manager Claudio Ranieri last summer, but their rise to the top began in 2009 when, under Mandaric, they won the League One title with Nigel Pearson as manager.And while Mandaric is now supporting the club from afar, the former chief has told talkSPORT he is ‘happy and proud’ for the club and ecstatic for their faithful supporters.“It’s a great thing, a very special one-in-a-lifetime moment”, he told the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast.“It’s incredible and it really shows also that money is not always everything. You see other big clubs who have spent £200million per season, and look where they are. Then we have the mighty Leicester spending little and winning the title! I’m so happy and proud.“I started something there when the club were in difficulties in League One, but we sorted it. I always said we’d sell the club one day, but would only sell to the right people, and I’m so happy for those great supporters with what’s happened there this season.“Can they repeat this next season? It will be difficult, but they’ve achieved something this year that nobody else has achieved.“I think if they finish in the top ten next season, that would still be a great achievement for Leicester.”Only a matter of days have passed since the confirmation of Leicester’s unbelievable triumph – they are still yet to lift the trophy – and already teams are reportedly planning to plunder the Foxes squad of their stars.Riyad Mahrez and N’Golo Kante have both been strongly linked with moves away, but Mandaric insists the club’s Thai owners will pull out all the stops to keep the title-winning side together for next season’s championship defence.“These owners are not sellers,” he added.“They are very proud people and they will try to do everything to keep their best players and try to continue.“The team have a fighting spirit and the key thing is that Ranieri and all his staff stay. They’ve got tremendous staff at Leicester, they’re good people and they will be targeted by other clubs now, so it’s important the club keep everyone.“They care for each other and have been like a team of brothers this season.”last_img read more

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MAN PLEADS GUILTY TO NAIL GUN ATTACK

first_imgA Donegal man has pleaded guilty to using a nail gun and threatening to kill a man during a disturbance at a house in Letterkenny.Marcus Spratt, 29, pleaded guilty to three different charges when he appeared at Letterkenny Circuit Court today.The court heard the incident related to an altercation at the home of victim Donal Coyle of 9 Glencar Park, Letterkenny on November 5th, 2006. Spratt, of Gortnacorrib, Letterkenny, pleaded guilty possessing the weapon, another of criminal damage to six windows and a door and also making threats to kill or cause serious harm to Donal Coyle on the same date.Judge John O’Hagan adjourned the case until July and directed that a community service report be carried out on Spratt in the meantime.AT HEARING © 2011 donegaldaily.com, all Rights ReservedThe copying, republication or redistribution of donegaldaily.com Content, including by framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited by law.Follow us on www.twitter.com/donegaldailyFollow us on www.facebook.com/donegaldailyMAN PLEADS GUILTY TO NAIL GUN ATTACK was last modified: February 8th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Letterkenny Circuit CourtMarcus Sprattnail gunlast_img read more

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CRIME CRISIS: ANOTHER MAJOR BURGLARY AS GARDAI REJECT ROSTERING CLAIMS

first_imgThere has been ANOTHER major burglary in the Newtowncunningham area. The local county council compound was broken into overnight and equipment was taken.It is believed doors were smashed and an undisclosed materials taken by a gang.A full inventory is now being taken by council staff to see what the thieves stole.It comes as Gardai reject claims that there is not enough Garda patrols in the area. Supt Vincent O’Brien said yesterday that he was satisfied with the rostering systems along the border areas.However local Fianna Fail county councillor Paul Canning described the situation as “ridiculous.”“People in the area are simply not happy with the Garda cover and that’s a fact. That’s what I’m hearing on the ground.“Donegal is an island on its own and it is not adequately covered by Gardai. The many recent incidents in this area have shown that.“We need an increase in manpower not a review of the situation. We need Gardai on the ground to tackle this increase in vandalism and robberies,” he said. CRIME CRISIS: ANOTHER MAJOR BURGLARY AS GARDAI REJECT ROSTERING CLAIMS was last modified: July 6th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:COUNCIL DEPOTNewtowncunninghamPaul Canninglast_img read more

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Seniors meet at holiday tables

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals “I think it is the nicest thing for senior citizens, and we get together here with different senior centers and it is just like a homecoming,” she said. “(And) we said we’ll meet again, God willing, next year.” The Rotary Club helped pay for the event, and the restaurant donated food, as did its suppliers and a local church. City Councilman Dennis Zine attended the event and said he would like to get corporate sponsorship to help seniors on Thanksgiving. “See, downtown has a huge homeless population; we have a huge senior population,” Zine said. “So we want to take care of the needs in the community.” At the other end of the Valley, volunteers served meals to about 300 people in need at Temple Beth Hillel in Valley Village. Volunteer drivers carted out another 300 meals so needy families could enjoy Thanksgiving at home. The Reform synagogue also collects food in its basement and feeds 5,000 people a month with the help of six other Christian and Jewish congregations. As usual, the kitchen at the Sagebrush Cantina was pumping out food Thursday, but this time the diners ate for free. The restaurant on the border between the West San Fernando Valley and Calabasas served a Thanksgiving feast to about 500 seniors, with the help of the Calabasas/Agoura Hills Rotary Club and youths from a church group and a high school. “The Rotary Club people, the young people are oh-so-friendly,” said Bobbie Powell, who came with other seniors from Owensmouth Garden in Woodland Hills. “And we’re sitting out here in the sunshine. Where else can you do that except California?” Emmi De Waard, 78, a retired industrial photographer, also liked the traditional Thanksgiving meal of turkey, cranberry sauce and potatoes. “It’s predicated on the notion that the future health and welfare of the Jewish community is tied up inextricably with the health and welfare of the rest of the world,” Rabbi Jim Kaufman said. Along with other volunteers, Keith Gurian, 51, of Granada Hills started working in the synagogue’s kitchen Sunday to get ready for Thursday’s event. With volunteers working nearly 10 hours Sunday and coming in after work for nearly eight hours both Monday and Tuesday, the kitchen turned out 900 pounds of turkey. “Just sweat and burn,” Gurian said, showing off a pair of hash marks he accidentally burned into his left forearm while volunteering this week. Niranjala Rodrigo came to the United States three years ago from Sri Lanka and was enjoying her first traditional Thanksgiving meal, along with her husband, her three children and her mother. “This day, I think people (are) happy, and some family come all together at the table,” she said. “It’s (a) very nice time.” World War II veteran Bernard J. Cohen, 85, of North Hollywood also enjoyed the meal. During the war, the plane he was in was shot down in 1944, crashing into the ocean near New Guinea. “They told me in Brisbane, Australia, (during treatment) that I was going to survive the war and come back and die of old age,” he said, “but they never told me what old age was.” Alex Dobuzinskis, (818) 546-3304 alex.dobuzinskis@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Donegal house prices are lowest in Ireland – REA

first_imgThe price of the average house in County Donegal remains the lowest in Ireland at €95,000 for a 3-bed semi-detached home.The figure has remained unchanged over the past year, according to the Real Estate Alliance. The REA Average House Price Survey, released today, concentrates on the actual sale price of Ireland’s typical stock home, giving an up-to-date picture of the second-hand property market to the close of last week.“Supply of three-bed semi-detached homes across the county is limited,” said Paul McElhinney of REA McElhinney in Milford, where an average three-bed semi costs €95,000 and remains on the market for six weeks.“We are seeing that market demand for what is available is fair.”The average semi-detached house nationally now costs €236,028, the latest REA Average House Price Survey has found – a rise of 0.05% on the first three months of 2019.Donegal house prices are lowest in Ireland – REA was last modified: June 24th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Joule of South Africa’s highway

first_img “Optimal Energy is capitalising on South Africa’s technological prowess, its track record of building premium cars for the export market, the current sea of change in transport technology brought about by climate change, pollution and energy security issues, and the immense progress in battery technology,” Meiring told Sapa. After the pilot fleet is launched, the company plans to begin mass production in 2012. Meiring said this meant the company would not be hindered by the current economic situation, adding that there was “enormous interest” in the Joule. “Current market conditions are slowing down the traditional manufacturers’ efforts while the market, especially for clean vehicles, is predicted to be in a strong upward swing from 2012 onwards.” The zero-emission Joule is a six-seater multi-purpose vehicle designed by Cape Town-based Optimal Energy in association with legendary South African-born automotive designer Keith Helfet. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material Zero emissions The Joule: it’s clean, it’s mean – and it’s good-looking, to boot! Click arrow to play video. The chassis of the Joule has been designed to accommodate two large-cell lithium ion battery packs which use chemistry similar to that used in mobile phones and laptop computers. SAinfo reporter and BuaNewscenter_img Using a normal 220 Volt home outlet and the Joule’s onboard charger, it takes approximately seven hours to recharge the Joule’s battery for a 200km driving range, with two packs providing 400km in total. Electric cars use about 20 percent of the energy that conventional cars use, meaning that the total emissions are much less. And with the global trend of electricity generation becoming “cleaner”, the emissions generated by electric cars will continue to shrink. The Joule was unveiled at the 2008 Paris Motor Show, and recently displayed at a climate change conference in Johannesburg. Studies show that 99 percent of urban users drive less than 150 kilometres a day. Optimal Energy recommends that only one battery pack is necessary to power the Joule. 6 April 2009 A pilot fleet of South African-made electric cars are due to hit the country’s roads by 2010, the company which builds them said on Thursday. Optimal Energy, the company which manufactures the electric-powered Joule, has received financial backing from the Department of Science and Technology and issued shares to the Industrial Development Corporation, spokeswoman Diana Blake told the South African Press Assocation (Sapa). “This investment helps us to drive the industrialisation process, taking us to the next level,” Optimal Energy CEO Kobus Meiring said.last_img read more

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There is No Perfect VP of Sales and Marketing

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting dana oshiro Tags:#start#startups Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts center_img Sales and marketing are not the same thing. It’s true they both deal with relationship management and it’s true that neither of these job descriptions require hardcore engineering, but just because they’re both in the realm of words over code does not mean that they are the same. At the risk of muddling your mind with HR jargon, the core competencies of a marketer are very different from those of a sales person. Surprisingly, many startup CEOs insist on hiring for a VP of Sales and Marketing position. If you’re the VP of sales and marketing for your company, this article is not about how you aren’t doing your job properly. In fact, it’s about how you’re doing the job of two separate people and shouldn’t be. Interwest investor Bruce Cleveland recently wrote an article entitled, In Search of the Mythical VP Sales and Marketing where he defines the separate domains of sales and marketing. Says Cleveland, “Sales and Marketing are vastly different functions that require substantially different personalities, skills, and decades of experience to master…A CEO who doesn’t understand this basic fact, or doesn’t believe it, is not a CEO I want to invest in.” Explains Cleveland, a sales person understands the inner workings of B2B deal probabilities and the short term requirements to increase deal flow. Meanwhile, marketing people look at the landscape from a longterm perspective and lay the groundwork for sales through analyst, media and web leads generation. Essentially, sales people are great oral one-on-one communicators and marketers are great written mass communicators. He writes, ” I have found that the CEO who makes this serious mistake hasn’t worked with someone who is an excellent Marketer and therefore discounts the role it plays.” With expertise in the Software as a Service space, it’s interesting that Cleveland believes the marketing role is the one that gets tacked on at the last minute. While sales offers obvious measurement through direct revenue generation, marketing tends to have a less clear set of metrics.Cleveland explains that “today’s head of Marketing must be an excellent demand creator (the “owner” of future revenue) through sales-ready leads.” Essentially he believes that the marketer’s job is to increase perceived value and generate demand on a massive scale in order to grease the wheels of the sales team. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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The petroglyphs of Ratnagiri

first_imgThe colour of the setting sun matches the ferrous red of the porous laterite rock that dominates the terrain of Ratnagiri and Rajapur along Maharashtra’s Konkan coast. At a quarter past six in the evening, in the small village of Devache Gothane, when there is finally some respite from the heat, the two shades converge, casting a soft glow on the lush grass that covers the flat hilltops. The monsoon has evidently been generous to this region. A steep climb from the village ends in an endless expanse of such grass. But the sight that greets you in the middle of it, on a patch where the heat has baked the surface of the red laterite black, makes the climb worth it.An oval ring of stones frames an image carved into the laterite. It depicts a human form — a man standing feet akimbo, arms loose by his side. The carving is about eight feet long. It’s the head that is most striking, framed by a kind of aura or halo. Something about the vastness of that meadow, the rapidly fading light, and the eerie nature of that single carving in a desolate field evokes a strange excitement. A small window into another world.This carving is one of the over 1,000 such petroglyphs that have been discovered in and around the Ratnagiri and Rajapur districts over the last two or three years, making them one of the most significant archaeological finds of recent times. The carvings cover over 52 sites across the region. The 12 sites that The Hindu travelled to contained an incredible range of images, from basic depictions of human and animal forms to a stunning 50-ft carving of an elephant, within which a series of smaller animal and aquatic forms were drawn. From abstract patterns and fertility symbols carved rudimentarily on the rock surface to dizzyingly complex geometric reliefs cut deep into the rock, the etchings seem straight out of the movie Signs or the television series Lost. The term rock art usually brings to mind pictographs (paintings on rocks). But these are petroglyphs, and the fact that the images are carved into the flat, open rock surface gives them a scale and look that is unique.Filling a gap in history“These petroglyphs fill a huge gap in the history of the Konkan region,” says Tejas Garge, Director, Directorate of Archaeology and Museums, Maharashtra. There is ample evidence that in the medieval age, the Konkan coast was lined with important port towns. It has been reconstructed from epigraphs and contemporaneous records that it has a history of trade and contact with Europe, and even with the Roman Empire. But there was a big void regarding what went on here in prehistoric times. Some evidence has come from the caves in the region. A team of researchers from Deccan College, Pune, discovered stone tools that were estimated to be 25,000 years old. “If you consider that the records of the port towns are from about 3,000 BCE, we are talking of a gap of about 20,000 years. No one knew what happened here during this period,” Garge says.The working theory around these petroglyphs is that they date back to about 10,000 BCE, placing them in the Mesolithic Period, which comes between the Old Stone Age or Paleolithic period, characterised by chipped stone tools, and the New Stone Age or Neolithic period, associated with smaller, more polished tools. The basis for this reasoning are two-fold. The first is that the petroglyph style of art is associated in other archaeological sites with tools from the Mesolithic period. Second, near one petroglyph site in the village of Kasheli, about 25 km from Ratnagiri city, Garge’s team also found evidence of stone tools, along with the petroglyphs dating back to this time. More precise dating may be hindered at this point, he explains, partly because of the way in which many of these sites were discovered.“These were accidental discoveries by amateurs. As often happens in such cases, they cleared away much of the soil around the carvings, soil that would normally have been part of the archaeological record,” he says. Accidental discovery by explorers is not uncommon in archaeology, Garge says, adding that amateurs account for about 20% of all the world’s archaeological discoveries.The road to discoveryIn 2010, Sudhir Risbood, an electrical engineer, started a campaign and an informal group called Adgalnavarche Konkan, or Unexplored Konkan. Risbood is a keen ornithologist and a passionate raconteur of Konkan history. His eyes light up when he speaks of the different kinds of beaches in the region (black sand, red sand, and white sand), and the multitude of forts and temples that have become tourist attractions. For years now, he has been building replicas of the forts of Ratnagiri, Raigad, and Sindhudurg for public display. He likes to regale students and history enthusiasts with tales of how they were built and operated.  Many of the petroglyphs are accompanied by abstract motifs and symbols, the meaning of which is not yet known. The most intriguing of these is the motif of two legs, squatting and spread outward. The symbol is cut off at the hip and is usually deployed as a side motif to the larger, more abstract rock reliefs. “Images from later periods depict a goddess called Lajja Gauri who is similarly portrayed, squatting and with legs facing outward, though in those cases the rest of the body is also shown. We are exploring a link between the two,” Garge says.Apte believes that some of the more complex reliefs, etched deep into the ground, may have been done using metal tools rather than stone. If his theory is proven right, then just as in sites like Bhimbetka, where art has been dated from prehistoric times right down to the medieval period, it could point to a continuous habitation of this region, across millennia, possibly by various nomadic tribes. Apte, who is now doing his PhD on these petroglyphs, is also working on a theory that the carvings get more complex as one moves from north to south, suggesting a pattern of migration in this direction over many centuries. One of the most complex petroglyphs The Hindu visited, in the village of Barsu at the southern tip of Ratnagiri, was a large image of a man standing with two tigers (etched stylistically with precise geometric shapes) flanking him on either side. The carvings in the north of Ratnagiri district are more basic depictions of animal and human forms.Stage set for further researchThe discovery of these sites marks the commencement of what is likely to be a long project. “We still need to look for more evidence of stone tools and evidence of settlements around these sites so that we can do a more accurate dating,” Apte says. So far, such evidence has been hard to come by in Ratnagiri and Rajapur, though there have been recent reports of some caves with petroglyphs being discovered in the Sindhudurg region. To discover more such petroglyph sites, Garge is also planning to deploy drones to cover areas of open laterite rock surface that are not yet accessible. Then there is the question of comparative analysis and collaboration with various universities to understand more about these sites. Maharashtra’s Archaeology Department is already in the process of putting together an academic paper detailing these findings.For now, while the State government has set aside ₹24 crore for further research on these sites, a lot of administrative work still needs to be done if they are to be showcased as tourist attractions for the region. For a start, the sites need to be notified as archaeological heritage. Then, as Risbood explains, the State government will have to engage in a long process of land acquisition that could prove tricky.“We have already spoken to many of the villagers in this region. Some are willing to work in partnership with the government because they realise the importance of these sites,” Risbood says. This would involve a system whereby viewing galleries are created and the villagers are able to charge a small fee and possibly sell tea and snacks. The Maharashtra Tourism Development Corporation has already shown interest in developing some of these sites and incorporating them into the tourist circuit of a region that attracts a lot of travellers, drawn to it by the beaches and famous temples such as Ganpatipule.Going forward, Risbood concedes that a more coherent narrative needs to be woven around some of the more prominent sites. Promoting tourism and the unknown wonders of the Konkan region is, of course, his passion. The heaps of documents that he has gathered for each site also include rudimentary drawings for viewing galleries and detailed plans for partnership with the villagers. That story, as also the unfolding archaeological research on these sites, is likely to be an even more exciting one. | Photo Credit: Prashant Nakwe An eight ft­long petroglyph in Devache Gothane village in Rajapur district, Maharashtra.  Unexplored Konkan is a motley crew of like-minded individuals who are all into documenting nature. Manoj Marathe, like Risbood, is also an electrical engineer, but with a passion for butterflies. Surendra Thakurdesai is a geography professor with a deep interest in snakes. Along the way, they acquired a rotating cast of allies which included the Superintendent of Police and Collector of Ratnagiri district.In 2012, Risbood came up with a plan to expand the group’s activities. Having grown up in Ratnagiri, he remembered having seen, as a school boy, a square rock relief pattern just off the road near the village of Nivali, about 17 kilometres from Ratnagiri city. “I would cycle pass it and wonder what it was,” he says. It was full of interlocking curls and concentric circles, Risbood recalls, but of course, he had no idea that he was seeing a petroglyph from an ancient culture. But he did know that the local tribal population treated it with reverence, as a legacy of their forefathers.Years later, in the mid-2000s, while doing a project in the area around the Aryadurga temple and Ganpatipule, Risbood came across more such rock carvings. “In 2012, we decided to see how many more sites like these we could find. We started asking around in the villages, and realised that because of the new roads people didn’t walk across the flat rock surfaces any more. But some of the older people knew.”A shepherd was the first to volunteer information. He plotted a location for them by describing a boundary wall and the shape of bushes around the petroglyph. From then on, there was no looking back. Three sites became 52, and Rajapur and the number of petroglyphs recorded grew to over a thousand. When the new director of the Directorate of Archaeology and Museums (Garge) visited Ratnagiri in 2016, Risbood sought a meeting. He showed sketches of the petroglyphs to Garge and took him to some of the locations. In 2017, Garge transferred a young Archaeology Department official, Rutwij Apte, from Pune to Ratnagiri to work full time on the petroglyphs. Currently, Apte and Risbood’s crew are in charge of the project.As much as they are involved in discovering and documenting the sites, Risbood and Apte, along with Manoj Marathe, have also started speaking to the local villagers about the importance of the sites and the need to protect them. The ring of stones around the human carving in Devache Gothane is one such attempt. In other sites, particularly where the petroglyphs fall in land that is mined for laterite stone, widely used in construction across the western coast, they have convinced the land owners to erect brick boundaries protecting the sites. Help also arrived from the Collector, Radhakrishnan B., who put a halt to mining around some sites. In the village of Ukshi in north Ratnagiri, for a large engraving of an elephant, the team worked with local authorities to construct a circular viewing gallery, complete with an inscription that explains the art work’s significance.Decoding their significanceWhat do we know so far about the significance of these petroglyphs? The Ratnagiri project is yet to focus on comparative analysis. But these carvings could be contemporaneous to other petroglyph sites in India that date back to the Middle and Later Stone Age. The period in history preceding the Indus Valley Civilisation, which is dated to about 5,000 BCE, is a rich one of historical discovery, with evidence of stone tool cultures scattered across the subcontinent.Prominent petroglyph and rock art sites in India that could be contemporary to this period are the Bhimbetka rock shelters in Madhya Pradesh, rock carvings in Mirzapur in Uttar Pradesh, petroglyphs from the Tindivanam and Viluppuram districts in Tamil Nadu and Unakoti in Tripura. The carvings on laterite stone are what make the petroglyphs in this region unique, as the carvings discovered in other sites around India are on granite and sandstone. More recently, petroglyphs of a similar nature, though not in the same numbers, have been discovered in Sindhudurg district, and near the banks of the Kushavati river in Goa. Both are south of Ratnagiri, hinting at a pattern of migration.Garge is quick to point out that this is not yet evidence of a civilisation, as there is no evidence of writing, agricultural or economic activity, or of living arrangements or settlements. It’s more likely, he says, that these were nomadic tribes, with the preponderant depiction of animals and aquatic life suggesting that they were hunter-gatherer tribes. Interestingly, there are no actual scenes depicting the hunting of animals, unlike the carvings in Bhimbetka and Mirzapur. “In Maharashtra’s cultural records, there is no evidence of any art being practised until about 3,000 BCE, which is when we find the first mention of painted pots and clay figurines. That’s why these petroglyphs are a significant find for a better understanding of the history of this region and its artistic traditions,” Garge says.It could be argued that the very content of the petroglyphs points to their relevance. For starters, some of them depict rhinoceroses and hippopotami, two species that were never thought to be prevalent in this part of India. The carvings, however, suggest that the Konkan may have once been a lot like the rainforests where these animals are typically found.More pertinent, perhaps, is the scale of the art itself. “We have to ask what is the purpose behind all these carvings. In many of the cases, what we have are not rudimentary scratches but carvings with a great deal of detail. Some are incredible life-size depictions of large animals such as elephants and tigers,” Garge says. Most of the art from the later medieval period is religious in nature, he says, and it is quite likely that such a significant investment in art points to some form of religious belief or religious system.last_img read more

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