EARLY EXIT: Syracuse misses 6 shots on final possession, falls to N.C. State in quarterfinals of ACC tournament

first_img Published on March 14, 2014 at 9:30 pm Contact David: dbwilson@syr.edu | @DBWilson2 Facebook Twitter Google+ GREENSBORO, N.C. — Earlier in the season, maybe one of those final shots would have found the bottom of the net. But for Syracuse, playing in its first Atlantic Coast Conference tournament game, that sort of magic has vanished.Down three to North Carolina State with less than 30 seconds remaining, Tyler Ennis missed a tough layup. Syracuse gathered the rebound. Jerami Grant missed a putback dunk. Syracuse gathered the rebound. Ennis missed a 3. Syracuse gathered the rebound. Trevor Cooney missed a 3. Syracuse gathered the rebound. C.J. Fair missed a 3. Syracuse gathered the rebound. Cooney missed a 3. The ball bounced too far out of bounds for Fair to save it.Six chances to send the game into overtime or at least extend it to an extra possession. Six misses. The final score lingered at 66-63 through it all and the Orange left its first ACC tournament in the quarterfinals.“We got a few good looks and myself, I got a clean look. I just didn’t knock it down,” Fair said. “And from there, we was just scrambling trying to get in another opportunity.”The 3-point shot, though, has been No. 11 Syracuse’s greatest weakness this season and it prevented the No. 2-seed Orange (27-5, 14-4 ACC) from another miracle against the No. 7-seed Wolfpack (21-12, 9-9) in front of 21,533 at Greensboro Coliseum in North Carolina on Friday.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSU’s offense was disastrous from the start and Syracuse dug itself into another hole. It found some offensive stability late in the second frame — “We made some really good plays to get back in it,” head coach Jim Boeheim said — but with the game on the line, the offense reverted back to its first-half form and wilted.“…And we made two bad plays to get back out of it.”With 3:41 remaining, the Orange had completed its rally from a double-digit deficit and took a two-point lead. On the defensive end, Grant blocked T.J. Warren to set up a runout in the other direction.Ennis pushed the ball up the floor and threw up a runner in the lane that missed off the glass. Cooney committed a foul and Anthony “Cat” Barber sunk two free throws to tie the game.“It was a really bad play,” Boeheim said, “and we haven’t been making those plays in the close games.”Until that point, though, Ennis was the one that kept SU close.When Syracuse fell behind by 10, he carried the Orange back with one of his best scoring displays of the year. He drilled two 3s, sunk another jumper and dished out two assists during a 14-5 run that pulled the Orange within one entering the final five minutes.“Tyler tries to score when we need points,” Boeheim said, “and we needed points.”Even after he followed up a rare offensive miscue with an offensive foul two possessions after Fair committed one, there were still chances to be had. With 25 seconds left, the Orange had one more chance that turned into six.Ennis got to the rim and missed a tough layup, but Grant’s putback dunk should have been easier. Four consecutive 3s missed, including a good look for Fair, and the Orange couldn’t capitalize on its opportunity.“We needed a 3, so we wanted to get as many 3s up as we could, hoping that one would go in for us,” Cooney said.The locker room scene that followed is one that has suddenly become familiar. For 25 games, Syracuse never had to deal with a loss, but losing in its first ACC tournament game the Orange is facing the harsh reality that it now can’t afford another one.Pasted on the wall between several of the lockers was a poster with a picture of the ACC championship trophy in the middle and the numbers “3 2 1” along the bottom — presumably representing each win needed to take home that trophy.As SU exited Greensboro Coliseum for the first time, the posters remained intact. None of the numbers were crossed off.“On any given night, we could lose to any team,” Ennis said, “but we could also beat any team. We’ve just got to get our confidence.” Commentslast_img read more

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Alexis Abboud looks toward approaching family reunion during freshman season

first_img Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on January 30, 2019 at 11:50 pm Contact Zach: ztweisle@syr.educenter_img For 5-foot-6 utility player Alexis Abboud, a 2,700-mile journey from California to central New York wasn’t the product of Syracuse’s location or athletic facilities. It was Abboud’s belief in head coach Shannon Doepking.Eight days away from Syracuse softball’s season-opener against San Diego State, Abboud is still learning from upperclassmen utility players Bryce Holmgren and Alicia Hansen. Following a prolonged practice on Jan. 23, an opportunistic Abboud instinctively associated her new life with her flexible outlook on 2019. As she looks into her freshman campaign, Abboud prepares to play top Atlantic Coast Conference competition, including her sister, Rachel, who’s playing in her second year at Duke.“Being a freshman, I have awesome people ahead of me that I get to learn from and play with every day,” Abboud said. “I think right now my role is to learn as much as I can from them.”Growing up in La Canada, California, the Abboud sisters started softball at a young age. Though the two went to different high schools, Abboud and Rachel played together in tee ball, and eventually joined together on the same travel team in the Firecrackers travel organization, where the two captured the 2016 PGF National Championship.Abboud committed to Syracuse despite her belief that early playing time was not guaranteed. SU already had Holmgren, who hit .413 last season, and Hansen, who led the team in home runs (5). Knowing that, Abboud wanted to learn from SU’s top players, something that Lailoni Mayfield went through a year prior.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Alicia took me under her wing, and that helped me with the softball aspects of the sport being both an infielder and outfielder,” Mayfield said, “and Bryce helped me keep my mentality correct and help me keep things in perspective.”Now, a sophomore, Mayfield has looked to do the same for Abboud as she transitions to collegiate softball. For Holmgren, from Roland, Iowa, and Hansen, from Liverpool, the last three years in central New York’s weather and softball program have been far from foreign. But for Abboud and Mayfield, natives of La Canada and Cerritos, California, respectively, attending Syracuse has been a wakeup call.“It’s definitely an adjustment, but it makes me a better player, in the long run,” Abboud said, “having to adapt and learn new things out here every day.”Abboud faces scenarios that are a commonality among most freshman: her role is undefined, and she’s trying to learn from top players at a fast pace.But instead of having her sights on the Orange’s first game or her first crack at playing time, her most anticipated outing in 2019 won’t come for another three months. Come April 12, the first ever tilt between the Orange and Blue Devils will take place, and for the Abboud’s, a family reunion.“That game against Duke,” Abboud said of what she’s most looking forward to.last_img read more

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Wrestler Sarita Devi says ‘I’m not finished yet’, vows comeback

first_img First Published: 28th September, 2019 11:34 IST Last Updated: 28th September, 2019 13:51 IST Wrestler Sarita Devi Says ‘I’m Not Finished Yet’, Vows Comeback 37-y.o Indian boxer Sarita Devi is eyeing for a medal at the World Championships as she made a miraculous comeback & is vying to prove all her detractors wrong. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00Loaded: 0%Duration 0:00Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio TrackQuality LevelsFullscreenThis is a modal window. This video is restricted from playing on your current domain Error Code: PLAYER_ERR_DOMAIN_RESTRICTED COMMENT SUBSCRIBE TO US Thirteen years back, in her prime, she had won a World Championship gold in 2006 in Delhi at the age of 24. And she eventually became the second most coveted and talked about Indian woman boxer after the legendary MC Marykom. At 37, Sarita Devi is still a force to reckon with — if her strong comeback in trials, the rigorous practice sessions, her commitment and fire in her eyes are anything to go by. “People have mocked at me. They said Sarita is finished. She is over. She cant win anymore. She is old. Now I am back. I have defeated all these young girls in early twenties and in their prime. What do my critics say now?” Sarita told Republic TV before leaving for Women’s World Boxing  Championship in Russia.READ: Deepak Punia Reaches World Championship Final; Books Olympics BerthSarita Devi eyes medal at World ChampionshipSarita Devi had suffered a few injuries in the past and was forced to take a break a few times. But that did not stop her from loving the sport and her unparallel commitment for the game ensured her miraculous comeback this year. Not many in the Boxing Federation or even in IOA had thought she would be back. Sarita said she was aiming to get a medal in the World Championship to prove all her detractors wrong. “I have won enough medals for myself. This will be dedicated to them,” the champion boxer said ironically. Sarita and the legendary Mary Kom will spearhead a strong 10-member Indian contingent in the women’s World Boxing Championships in Ulan Ude, Russia from October 3 to 13. It has been a long time since Sarita won a medal in the World Championships and she is seeking to break the 11-year-old hiatus in which could be her last outing at this global event. “Whenever I featured in the World Championships in the last 10 years I really played well but lost my bouts from winning positions. So it’s a big challenge for me this time. I have worked a lot, brought about a lot of changes in my technique. So I am fully confident that I will get a medal this time,” she said.READ: Saina Nehwal: Badminton Ace’s Journey From Hisar To London OlympicsSarita Devi’s unique featSarita has maintained her same weight category for the last 10 years — a record of sort. “It is not easy. I started competing at the light bantam category and mostly competed in bantam, welter category and even at the age of 37, I am still competing in 60 kg category which is the most competitive weight category in women boxing,” she observed. Apart from her 2006 gold, Sarita has won two more bronze medals in 2005 and 2008 World Championships, a staggering 8 medals including 5 gold medals in Asian Championship, a silver in 2014 Commonwealth Games and a bronze in 2014 Asian Games. But an Olympic medal has remained elusive for the lightweight (60kg category) boxer from Manipur and she is desperate to win that in Tokyo before drawing curtains on her career. READ: IAAF World Championships 2019: Avinash Sable Aims For Tokyo OlympicsREAD: PV Sindhu’s Magical Journey From Hyderabad To Rio Olympics Session ID: 2020-09-09:865ea0b8bb6300775c4e72d7 Player Element ID: video_player_5f577859d5cab OK Close Modal DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreencenter_img WATCH US LIVE Written By Suman Ray LIVE TV FOLLOW USlast_img read more

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Chelsea’s semi-final pursuit ended by Mazembe

first_imgBerekum Chelsea are out of the running for a semi-final slot in the African Champions League following TP Mazembe’s win over Al Ahly on Sunday.The Congolese side beat Ahly 2-0 to qualify alongside the Egyptian champions into the last four after Chelsea could only draw 1-1 with Zamalek in Cairo 24 hours earlier.Chelsea, with six points, will host Mazembe, who joint-top with Ahly on 10 points in the final Group B match in mid-September but the outcome of that match not affect the standings.After a rather great start in just their debut campaign, Chelsea will now have to wait for a possible return to continental football in the next two seasons.The Berekum side were dethroned as Ghanaian champions by Asante Kotoko this season and they also failed to lift the FA Cup.last_img

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Auditor: Iowa budget healthy but concerns on the horizon

first_imgDES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Iowa’s auditor says the state budget is in good shape with surpluses but that beneficial federal tax policies will end in a few years, potentially causing problems.In his annual review of the state budget, Auditor Rob Sand said Thursday that federal tax changes made in 2017 gave Iowa’s budget a $188 million windfall for the 2019 fiscal year that ended June 30. He says the federal windfall accounts for about two-thirds of the estimated surplus for the current fiscal year.He’s reminding lawmakers that by the 2025-2026 budget year the portion of the federal tax break that benefits Iowa will end. Iowa will need to have built a significant surplus to avoid problems.Sand is presenting his budget review Thursday to legislative staff.He also says the state is not following best budget practices by underfunding its portion of Medicaid costs. For the last several years lawmakers have had to provide additional money to fill the void.Sand says it’s more accurate, transparent, and responsible to budget enough from the beginning.last_img read more

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Pogba starts amid talk of potential United exit

first_imgIt could actually be bad news for Pogba that he featured against Bournemouth as Mourinho hinted he had opted to rest some of the players he feels are essential to beat Tottenham at Wembley.“Is the team selection looking back at the weekend or ahead to the semi-final? A bit of both,” Mourinho told BT Sport.Final preparations at the Vitality Stadium for #MUFC!For a reminder of tonight’s team news, click here ? https://t.co/RtxY6IC303 pic.twitter.com/MtcKjG34UU— Manchester United (@ManUtd) April 18, 2018“I would say for example that Matic is looking for Saturday. But not every player that is out of the team is for the same reason.“The message is the same. People in the stadium or at home can be confused with my message. We have a fresh team. The majority of players didn’t play the last match.“It is a team where only Chris Smalling played for 90 minutes at the weekend. I don’t even speak about the semi-final.“We need four points to confirm a top-four position and that is target number one.”Share on: WhatsApp Bournemouth, United Kingdom | AFP | Paul Pogba was named in the Manchester United team for Wednesday’s clash with Bournemouth amid mounting speculation that the France midfielder is set to leave Old Trafford.United manager Jose Mourinho had vowed to drop several of his under-performing stars in the aftermath of Sunday’s shock 1-0 defeat against struggling West Bromwich Albion.United’s team-sheet at Dean Court was eagerly awaited as Mourinho — who accused them of complacency against Albion — made seven changes, yet kept Pogba in the starting line-up.Seven changes to your #MUFC starting XI… #BOUMUN pic.twitter.com/iKbO0SyRaa— Manchester United (@ManUtd) April 18, 2018Alexis Sanchez, Romelu Lukaku, Nemanja Matic, Ashley Young, Victor Lindelof, Antonio Valencia and Juan Mata were all left out ahead of Saturday’s FA Cup semi-final against Tottenham.It was Pogba’s fate that attracted the most interest.Pogba was widely criticised for his lacklustre display against Albion — the latest in a long line of disappointing efforts from the former Juventus star since his move to United two seasons ago.That sparked talk that Mourinho has told United to put Pogba up for sale, just days after Manchester City manager Pep Guardiola said he had been offered the chance to sign the midfielder by his agent in January.last_img read more

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Fantastic double for England in European Nations Cup

first_img The England men’s team pulled off a fantastic double with a consecutive clean sweep at the European Nations Cup in Sotogrande, Spain.The quartet of Bailey Gill, Ben Jones, Tom Plumb, and Tom Sloman successfully defended the trophy, with Sloman winning the individual title in a tense finale.The championship was contested by 15 countries and this is England’s eighth win. Previous victories were scored in 2018, 2015, 2013, 2011, 2010, 2009 and 2004.Meanwhile the England women’s team came third in their event in their best-ever result in this championship.The men won by eight shots at the end of a tough week, when a brutal wind made playing conditions difficult. Men’s team manager Gareth Jenkins commented: “This is a tremendous achievement.“The wind was really, really strong for the first two days and then it was swirling, making it very difficult on a course where you have to have pin point accuracy,“But the boys just dug in and they were really fantastic. It was a whole team effort and while it was never easy, it was great fun.”The team were in third place after the first round, but took the lead at the halfway stage and held on from there.They set out on today’s final round with an eight shot advantage over Holland, only to see that halved after the first three holes when their opponents made a fast start. But England kept playing steadily and the challenge faded.Sloman, however, had a roller-coaster on his way to the individual title. He had a two shot lead going into the final round but he struggled until an eagle three on the 14th put him right back in the mix.His dramas continued until the 18th, where his drive finished in the trees, but he managed a par after holing out from 15ft, completing the last five holes in one-under. It proved to be a winner when Germany’s Jannik de Bruyn missed from 4ft, failing to force a play-off.The women’s team of Georgina Blackman, Emily Toy and Bel Wardle were lying second with a round to play and were disappointed to slip back to third. But, team manager Jenny Henderson commented: “It was a good week for the women on a challenging golf course which demanded excellence in all areas. An exceptional work ethic ensured they were prepared to battle through windy conditions to put themselves in contention on the final day.”She added: “This is one of the few events where England Golf have the opportunity to send a male and female team and the dynamic has been great, with both teams working together and supporting each other throughout.”Players:MenBailey Gill, Lindrick, YorkshireBen Jones, Northamptonshire County, NorthamptonshireTom Plumb, Yeovil, SomersetTom Sloman, Taunton & Pickeridge, SomersetWomenGeorgina Blackman, Chelmsford, Essex,Emily Toy, Carlyon Bay, Cornwall,Bel Wardle, Prestbury, CheshireClick here for full scoresCaption: Back row, from left, Tom Plumb and Bailey Gill; front row, from left, Gareth Jenkins, Tom Sloman and Ben Jones. 13 Apr 2019 Fantastic double for England in European Nations Cup Tags: elite golf, England teams, European Nations Cuplast_img read more

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Detroit boxing gym offers encouragement for youth

first_imgby Rod BeardDETROIT (AP)—Shanté Higgs spends some of the school day thinking about throwing punches.When school is over, she does her homework and then looks for someone to fight—boy or girl, doesn’t matter. Most of the girls her age are afraid of Higgs, 15, so she normally fights boys. She doesn’t get in trouble because of her fights, though. In fact, it’s encouraged as part of the daily routine at the Downtown Boxing Gym, a small training club near Eastern Market in Detroit. The gym offers a youth program that serves about 30 students ages 8-18, who get valuable after-school academic tutoring and boxing training—all for free. It’s the brainchild of trainer Khali Muhammad and Scott Smith, who work with the students from 4-6:30 p.m. each day.All of the students get homework help based on their needs each session. This includes math and language arts. During the summer, the tutors plan to help with creative writing, public speaking and art, as well as typing, foreign language and ACT test prep to spur the students to excel academically as much as they do in the ring.Some of the youth boxers at Downtown are nationally ranked, but the competition is not the motivation behind getting them interested in boxing. It’s to give them a positive outlet for their frustrations and to get them involved in something constructive.“It keeps them off the streets and gives them something to do,” Muhammad said. “There are life lessons in boxing. If they’re coming here, they have to perform academically.”Youngsters from all over the city—and as far as Taylor—flock to the gym as their sanctuary away from the streets. It’s not just an after-school hangout; parents bring their children and stay to watch them train.The gym, which is open Monday through Saturday, has a white painted exterior and is almost camouflaged by the few houses and open fields surrounding it. The building used to be a car wash and a candy store.Now, the dank gym area is painted gray and has a cramped feel. Muhammad prefers the dreary decor and affectionately refers to the gym as the “Terrordome” for its no-frills ambience—as he believes it should be for boxers.“But when we train, we train hard,” Muhammad said. “You don’t have to be state-of-the-art.”Weights, heavy bags and other training apparatus line the walls, with the boxing ring in the corner. There aren’t any windows, adding to the claustrophobic feel, and the two doors provide most of the light—and a slight breeze—on a spring afternoon. The thick, musty air is broken only by the bell tones every 90 seconds or so, and by Muhammad alternately barking commands and encouragement to the young boxers.The gym provides an emotional refuge for Cortez Todd, 13, an eighth-grader at David Ellis Academy, who said he would consider becoming a pro boxer.“I like it here because I got into a lot of trouble in school and I can get my frustration out through boxing,” said Todd, who has boxed for four years and is ranked second nationally in his class. “The kids don’t mess with me at school now.”For Higgs, a sophomore at Ross Hill Academy, participating in the program is an opportunity to improve academically and athletically.“My parents ask if I’m coming home to do my homework and I tell them it’s done,” Higgs said. “(Tutoring) keeps me on track with what I need to do.”But Higgs has to overcome some challenges, as well: “This is where I come to fix my problems when I’m mad.”Muhammad was an aspiring boxer when he was in his 20s, until his fighting career was cut short when he was shot in his elbow. With that dream doused, he moved to training other young boxers.The idea for the youth program came about through an unusual series of events. Muhammad enjoyed helping train boxers and wanted to work with the students in the program for free, but couldn’t do all the training and also handle the business operations.Muhammad was training professional boxer Rich Powers, who recommended Muhammad’s workouts to some suburban friends. One of those friends was Jessica Hauser, who had experience working in the Birmingham Public Schools and helped establish after-school programs there.Hauser took the idea of the youth program to Smith, who had worked extensively in opening software companies and in the automotive industry. Together, the three wove the framework of the youth program, which officially opened in January.“It relieves the stress of having their parents pay,” Muhammad said. “We get donations from restaurants and other donors. They help where they can.”That connection with the community enables the youth program to remain viable and has helped Muhammad focus on training the students and trusting the business side to business people.“My goal is to solidify things financially so we can keep the gym open and the kids can have a place to come,” Smith said. “We want to take away every excuse the kids could have not to graduate from high school.” WAITING PATIENTLY—Fifteen-year-old Shante Higgs waits for her turn to spar at the Downtown Boxing Club in Detroit. The gym offers a youth program that serves about 30 students ages 8-18, who get valuable after-school academic tutoring and boxing training—all for free. (AP Photo/Detroit News, David Guralnick) last_img read more

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Six Young Artists Speak Up About Kinship Care

first_imgFacebook12Tweet0Pin1Submitted by Family Education and Support ServicesFamilies from across Washington will gather on Tuesday, May 23, 2017, at 11:00 a.m. in the Governor’s Mansion located near our State Capitol Building to honor six children who submitted winning essays for the 14th annual Kinship Voices of Children contest. Each of these young children and youth, ages 5 to 19-years-old, created inspirational pieces of written and/or visual art about their experiences being raised by a relative caregiver. Each child submitting a winning entry will be awarded with a signed certificate, a $100 check donated by Twin Star Credit Union, and an overnight stay at the Great Wolf Lodge for their family.Most children find safety and comfort in the arms and care of their family, including grandparents and other relatives. For more than 2 million children in the USA, living with a grandparent, aunt, uncle, or other family member has become a permanent or long-term arrangement. When parents are unable or unwilling to care for their children, placing them with a relative caregiver can have some advantages. Kinship care reduces the trauma children experience when placed with strangers. It enhances children’s sense of identity and self-esteem, continues connections children have to their siblings and other relatives, and strengthens the family’s ability to give children the support they need. Kinship care often comes as a surprise to both the child and the relative caregiver.What does it mean to a child who can’t live with their parents to know he or she is safe, loved, and has a place to belong? Some answers to this question are offered in the winning entries submitted to the Kinship Voices of Children Contest. The contest was originally initiated by the Statewide Kinship Oversight Coalition, and is coordinated by Family Education and Support Services in collaboration with Aging and Long Term Support Administration/DSHS, Lewis-Mason-Thurston Area Agency on Aging, and Kinship Navigators and advocates across Washington State. The event is sponsored by TwinStar Credit Union in collaboration with the Great Wolf Lodge.Judges included Bill Moss, David Stillman, Terry Jefferies, Amanda Stevens, Carrie Petit, Lori Mahar, Mike Fenton, Jennifer Strus, Teri Agulara Flemming, Shelley Arneson, Karen Fraser, Bonnie Jacques, Melisssa Goldman, Olvia Schu, and Trista Mason.6-year-old Joseph said this about his winning entry (pictured) – “Family is like gears- they all connect together.” Photo courtesy: Family Education and Support ServicesThis year, 52 entries were received. Some are funny, some serious or even sad, but all are sincere and offer testimony to the value, sense of family, and love each young artist experienced in living with a relative caregiver. The winning entries are:Joseph, age 6 – Olympia, WACasey, age 7 – Roy, WATaryn, age 8 – Forks, WAThomas, age 10 – Port Townsend, WASummer, age 13 – Naches, WABrittany, age 15 – Cashmere, WAIn addition to the children being honored, we will also acknowledge Ms. Judy Lin. Our 2017 booklet compiling all entries into the Voices of Children contest has been dedicated to Judy in honor of her substantial contributions to Kinship Caregivers across our State.For more information about this contest or to learn about Kinship Care Resources contact Lynn Urvina at 1-877-813-2828 or e-mail Lynn@FamilyESS.org.last_img read more

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