First problems of US Navy’s LCS showing?

January 25, 2016 Authorities View post tag: LCS First problems of US Navy’s LCS showing? Another Freedom-variant of the U.S. Navy’s littoral combat ships was unable to leave the port due to problems with the ship’s combining gears.“Littoral combat ship USS Fort Worth (LCS 3) experienced a casualty to the ship’s combining gears during an in-port period in Singapore, January 12”, said the Navy.In a similar incident, USS Milwaukee, the fifth LCS which was commissioned just two months ago had to be towed to port in December 2015 after it experienced problems with the ship’s combining gears.The official announcement said that problems for USS Milwaukee were caused by the discovery of metallic debris in the port and starboard combining gear filter systems.Based on the U.S. Navy’s initial indications, USS Fort Worth was sidelined “due to an apparent failure to follow procedures during an operational test of the port and starboard main propulsion diesel engines (MPDEs). The Navy said that a team of specialists were examining the incident but could not give an estimate of when the repairs might be completed.Although both ships encountered similar problems the Navy says they were unrelated because the problems occurred through different causes. Milwaukee’s problem could be a physical issue while the Fort Worth problem was most likely caused by personnel not following procedures.Combining gears allows Fort Worth to configure different types and combinations of engines for propulsion at sea.USS Fort Worth left her homeport of San Diego, California in November 2014 and is currently on a rotational deployment to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations. The ship is sidelined in Singapore’s Changi Naval Base.[mappress mapid=”17624″] View post tag: US Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today First problems of US Navy’s LCS showing? Share this article View post tag: USS Fort Worth read more

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US Navy showcases next-gen DJC2 NGE at Rimpac

first_img Authorities View post tag: RIMPAC U.S. Navy’s Shore and Expeditionary Integration Program Office (PMW 790) has developed the DJC2 NGE command and control system to support global operations with lower size, weight and power (SWaP) requirements.The system was developed in response to demands from forward deployed commanders and is now debuting at the world’s largest maritime exercise.The previous DJC2 has supported joint task force (JTF) and combatant commanders during real-world humanitarian assistance/disaster relief (HADR) operations around the world since 2003.“Operationally, DJC2 has been deployed extensively in support of HADR missions such as Hurricane Katrina back in 2005, the earthquakes in Haiti (2010) and Nepal (2015), the earthquake and subsequent tsunami in Japan (2011), and the Ebola relief effort in Liberia (2014),” said Anthony Vanaria, PMW 790 joint expeditionary assistant program manager.PMW 790 is now working with partners from industry and academia to create and test the latest configuration during RIMPAC.“The NGE gives us an increased capability to support the multinational contingent present at RIMPAC, and it does so on a diet,” said Jake Rakestraw, DJC2 operational demonstration planner and subject matter expert (SME) from New Venture Research Corporation. “The ability to support the expanding needs of the RIMPAC HADR with a smaller, more efficient system is a milestone event.”Diana Akins, of the Georgia Tech Research Institute, a DJC2 and Navy shore and expeditionary project command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance SME, explained, “We are working with PMW 790 to develop hardware and software solutions that move beyond interoperability and achieve true convergence into a common expeditionary and shore baseline supporting joint and Navy users for the foreseeable future.”Despite the critical role DJC2 fills for JTF commanders as their forward-deployed headquarters, DJC2’s size and weight make it intensive to transport. Its standard JTF headquarters configuration is known as the core configuration and consists of five enclaves that combine to weigh well over a ton.Each enclave is made up of individual components such as laptops, computer terminals, servers, peripherals, a networking suite and supporting infrastructure. Even a slightly scaled-down version, the early-entry (EE) configuration, with only three enclaves, is cumbersome to deploy, taking up 20 transport cases weighing 2,727 total pounds.DJC2 already needed a technical refresh for its heavily used components as well as to incorporate the latest advances in cybersecurity. Like many systems today, technology advancements allowed DJC2 to be modernized so it can do more with less, meaning less bulk and more capability.The necessary SWaP reductions and enhanced cybersecurity changes were suited to be explored simultaneously because expert personnel believed the upcoming system technical refresh could accomplish both objectives.The vision for NGE was to reduce SWaP requirements while increasing the cybersecurity posture to reach levels comparable to the latest and emerging commercial technologies but with the ability to manage the system virtually, rather than requiring a large cadre of information technology (IT) support.“It’s common practice for us to conduct technical insertion and technical refresh updates in order to modernize and avoid obsolescence of fielded systems,” Vanaria said. “We also continuously seek to enhance our products’ cybersecurity posture and reduce SWaP requirements, which should equate to lowered cost in fabrication, operation and sustainment.”The effort to modernize DJC2 started in 2015 with research, development, test and evaluation (RDT&E) analysis of alternatives and proof of concept for hardware and software configuration changes.Personnel working on the RDT&E effort determined multiple solutions, each with its own advantages, risks and barriers. The first consideration was to upgrade the traditional server enclave setup, but this did not provide the necessary reduction in SWaP. Another design consideration involved a converged infrastructure, meaning downsizing the compute, storage and networking capabilities to a single equipment chassis.“What was most attractive about the converged infrastructure design was the reduced number of IT support personnel needed to maintain the system,” Vanaria said. “Unfortunately, a converged infrastructure does not support the SWaP reductions we were looking for and we therefore knew that solutions beyond a converged infrastructure design would need to be examined.”Since the converged infrastructure was not a viable option due to the SWaP issue, developers next explored a hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI) layout. HCI accomplishes two major goals of modernization—virtualizing servers in order for them to operate as individual virtual machines dedicated to specific tasks and virtualizing data to enhance security.Virtualization compartmentalizes servers and allows operators to access and store data on dedicated secure servers offsite, which helps mitigate the potential for loss of data if the system is compromised. The HCI also offers lowered maintenance requirements, which saves personnel and maintenance costs.Although HCI provided all the bells and whistles the developers were looking for, the SWaP issue was not completely solved and developers therefore are exploring a solution beyond HCI for future iterations of the DJC2.This next logical step beyond HCI is a fabric-based infrastructure (FBI), which has the advantages provided by HCI but also includes cloud or data center storage. These features enable virtual expansion rather than physical expansion, but FBI does not meet today’s cybersecurity requirements. Therefore, DJC2 personnel opted to adopt the HCI solution now, confident that SWaP goals will be achieved and that another DJC2 system technical refresh will occur in three to five years, well before HCI-based SWaP advances would be negated.Procurement of the DJC2 NGE has begun, and fielding will start in fiscal year 2017.“The three-enclave EE configuration will go from 20 transit cases with 78 racks to four transit cases with 16 racks that take just one and half hours to set up,” Vanaria said. “The five-enclave standard core configuration will have similar proportional SWaP reductions.”PMW 790 also is procuring a DJC2 NGE for its Navy Expeditionary Combat Command Enterprise Tactical C2 solution. Additionally, the Navy’s Carrier and Air Integration Program Office (PMW 750) Tactical Mobile program has expressed interest in procuring NGE for its Tactical Operations Center and Mobile Tactical Operations Center solutions. US Navy tests next-gen command and control system DJC2 NGE at RIMPAC View post tag: US Navy View post tag: DJC2 July 7, 2016 Back to overview,Home naval-today US Navy tests next-gen command and control system DJC2 NGE at RIMPAC Share this articlelast_img read more

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DOWNES, PATRICIA

first_imgpassed away at Bayonne Medical Center on January 9, 2018. She was born in Jersey City and resided in Bayonne for most of her life. Patricia worked at the Stevens Institute of Technology for 50 years in the Metallurgical Department as an Administrative Assistant. Patricia was predeceased by her parents Michael and Catherine (nee: Malone) Downes and siblings Michael and Vincent Downes, Florence Zemann, Sr. Mary Rosarii S.C., brother-in-law Alfred Zemann, niece Cathy Kroboth and nephew Tony Ortiz. Friend of Carol Whaselsky. Sister of James Downs and his wife Eileen and Margaret Ortiz and her husband Tony. Aunt of Susan Ortiz. Sister-in-law of Helen and Wilma Downes. Also survived by many nieces and nephews and great nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in Patricia’s memory to the Development Office of the Sisters of Charity of Saint Elizabeth, P.O. Box 476, Convent Station, NJ 07961-0476. Funeral arrangements by S. FRYCZYNSKI & SON Funeral Home, 32-34 E. 22nd St.last_img read more

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Bank revalues Sunfresh business by another £70k

first_imgThe directors of Sunfresh Bakers Ltd were asked to stump up more to buy their business out of administration after a revaluation by their bank.According to documents from administrator MCR, directors Mark and Stephen Taylor purported to sell the Sunfresh bakery to a new company run by themselves Taylors the Bakers for £50,000 earlier this year after the bakery got into financial difficulty. The Taylors said that the original business would not have been able to continue if a buyer had not been found immediately, saving 140 jobs as a result. However, despite draft sales of £9.4m in the year to 1 October 2009, Sunfresh Bakers’ bank put Sunfresh into administration and, following a second valuation, asked the brothers to pay another £70,000. The Taylors have paid out £35,000 of this additional valuation and are paying off the rest in instalments.Taylors the Bakers, based in Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire produces oven-bottom muffins and, at the time of the sale, a spokeswoman said the company had the support of its clients.MCR reported that a total of 167 creditors were owed £3.4m by Sunfresh, including Sainsbury’s (£78,751), Asda (£9,783) and Bako North Western (£29,789). But director Mark Taylor disputed some of these, including Asda.Sunfresh’s last full accounts in November 2008 showed a pre-tax loss of £365,337 and net liabilities of more than £200,000. The company had to make 30 workers redundant earlier this year, due to a downturn in trade. Taylor said the company had taken back on 20 of these workers this year, thanks to an upturn in trade.last_img read more

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Giorgio Moroder, Armand Van Helden & More To Bring The 70’s To ‘I Feel Love’ Event

first_imgOn September 9 and 10, New York is going back in time, to when nightlife was about more than which club had the most lasers, who bought the biggest bottles, and which superstar DJ the crowd would be Instagramming. ‘I Feel Love’ promises to transport attendees to the disco era, promising a ‘groundbreaking immersive experience’ that sounds like Studio 54 mixed with Sleep No More in an abandoned warehouse in Brooklyn.Details about the mysterious event are scarce, but it is not for the faint of heart. Potential ticket buyers are warned “this event is not recommended for attendees who are not comfortable standing, walking, climbing stairs, being touched, interacting with participants, or being alone”. A warning like makes you wonder what exactly may be in store for the evening.While ‘I Feel Love’ is focusing on the experience, it doesn’t mean the line-ups aren’t completely stacked. Headlining both nights is legendary disco pioneer Giorgio Moroder, responsible for the event’s namesake track ‘I Feel Love’, along with a slew of hits including ‘Hot Stuff’, ‘Bad Girls’, ‘Last Dance’, ‘On The Radio’, ‘Flashdance…What A Feeling’, and, more recently his Daft Punk collaboration, ‘Giorgio by Moroder’. If you listened to music in the 70’s or watched a movie in the 80’s (Scarface, Top Gun) – you heard Giorgio. Supporting him are the likes of Armand Van Helden, Jackmaster, Soul Clap, Oliver, and former Studio 54 resident Nicky Siano.Tickets for this once in a lifetime event are available now at the official website.last_img read more

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The Doobie Brothers Announce First Ever Full-Album Shows At NYC’s Beacon Theatre

first_imgThe Doobie Brothers have announced a pair of very special performances at New York City’s historic Beacon Theatre. On November 15th and 16th, the band will deliver their first ever full-album performances. On Thursday, November 15th, The Doobie Brothers will perform their 1972 sophomore studio album, Toulouse Street, in its entirety. The following night, Friday, November 16th, the band will perform their third studio album, 1973’s The Captain and Me. Both nights’ performances will be supplemented by select Doobie Brothers hits.Tickets for both shows go on sale Mon, July 23rd at 10 a.m. (ET). Fans will have first access to tickets for both nights starting tomorrow, July 17th, at 10 a.m. local time using the code DOOBIESNYC. American Express card members will have pre-sale access Wednesday, July 18th, at 10 a.m. (local).A limited number of special VIP packages will also be available, including premium seating, a pre-show meet and greet with the band, exclusive commemorative merchandise, and more.Tonight, July 16th, The Doobie Brothers will wrap up their summer co-headlining tour with Steely Dan in Holmdel, New Jersey. For more information about the Beacon shows or to see a full list of The Doobie Brothers’ upcoming tour dates, head to the band’s website.last_img read more

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Excellence honored

first_imgThe American Political Science Association (APSA) has recognized three Harvard affiliates for excellence in the study, teaching, and practice of politics.Beth A. Simmons, director of the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and Clarence Dillon Professor of International Affairs in Harvard’s Department of Government, has won the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award for her interdisciplinary book “Mobilizing for Human Rights: International Law in Domestic Politics.”The award, supported by the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, is given annually by APSA for the best book published in the United States during the previous calendar year on government, politics, or international affairs.Simmons’ book, which argues that international human rights law has made a positive contribution to the realization of human rights in much of the world, also won the American Society for International Law’s 2010 certificate of merit for a pre-eminent contribution to creative scholarship. “Mobilizing for Human Rights” is remarkable in that interdisciplinary work rarely satisfies both disciplines, yet the book has garnered accolades from professional associations in law and politics.“I think it is a good signal that strict disciplinary lines are breaking down and open minds are prevailing in many scholarly societies,” said Simmons.Also being receiving awards from APSA are Steven J. Kelman, the Albert J. Weatherhead III & Richard W. Weatherhead Professor of Public Management in the Kennedy School of Government, and Mikhail Pryadilnikov, associate of the Kathryn W. and Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies.Kelman received the John Gaus Award and Lectureship to honor a lifetime of exemplary scholarship in the joint tradition of political science and public administration, and to recognize achievement and encourage scholarship in public administration. Pryadilnikov has won the Leonard D. White Award, supported by the University of Chicago, for the best doctoral dissertation in the field of public administration. His dissertation is titled “The State and Markets in Russia: Understanding the Development of Bureaucratic Implementation Capacities Through the Study of Regulatory Reform, 2001-2008.”Kelman, Pryadilnikov, and Simmons will receive their awards at the 2010 APSA annual meeting in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 2.last_img read more

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Junior named Truman Scholar

first_imgKatherine Warren ’13 has been named a Truman Scholar for the state of Washington. The award, which provides up to $30,000 for graduate school, is given annually to students from approximately 50 U.S. colleges and universities.An anthropology concentrator, Warren is a founding director of a Boston young women’s mentoring program and of the Akili Initiative, an online student think tank for global health. Her interests in women’s rights and health policy have led her to work on gender and disability in Bangladesh, mental health among American Indians, and research on violence against women for the United Nations. In her free time, she loves hiking and violin music.For more information on the scholars.last_img

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Observer announces new editorial board

first_imgSeven new editors will join The Observer’s Editorial Board in 2012-13 and two current editors will retain their positions, incoming Editor-in-Chief Allan Joseph announced Sunday. Juniors Chris Allen, Jillian Barwick, John Cameron, Kristen Durbin, Sarah O’Connor and Suzanna Pratt, along with sophomore Kevin Noonan, will assume their positions on the Editorial Board after Spring Break. Junior Brandon Keelean will return as Graphics Editor, while sophomore Meghan Thomassen will return as Viewpoint Editor. Allen, an Alumni Hall resident and native of East Brunswick, N.J., will serve as Sports Editor. An accounting major, Allen covered the Notre Dame hockey team on its Frozen Four run in 2011 and coordinated The Observer’s coverage of interhall football in 2010. Barwick, a communication studies major at Saint Mary’s College, hails from Wayne, N.J. and lives in LeMans Hall. Barwick will serve as Saint Mary’s Editor after a year of covering Saint Mary’s news for The Observer. Cameron and Durbin will take over as news editors. Cameron is a finance and political science major currently studying abroad in London. A resident of Keough Hall and native of Rolling Meadows, Ill., Cameron has significant experience covering student government and reporting on campus-community relations. Durbin originally hails from Prospect Heights, Ill., and lives in Walsh Hall. The American Studies and Arts and Letters preprofessional studies major has extensive experience with “ND Minute,” The Observer’s news video blog. She also covered organized-labor issues at Eddy Street Commons. O’Connor, a McGlinn Hall resident and native of Omaha, Neb., will serve as Multimedia Editor. A junior computer science major, O’Connor is also a member of The Observer’s Photography Department and has spent significant time upgrading the multimedia section of The Observer’s website. Pratt is an anthropology and peace studies major hailing from Seattle, Wash., and a resident of Pangborn Hall. Pratt has been The Observer’s lead hockey photographer and covered the campus-wide celebration following the death of Osama bin Laden. Pratt is currently studying abroad in Australia and will take over the photo department when she returns in the fall.last_img read more

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Westover talks faith, emotional resilience during Christian Culture Lecture

first_imgGenevieve Coleman | The Observer At an outdoor Christian Culture Lecture viewing event, President Katie Conboy addressed students prior to the pre-recorded lecture.She walked into her first formal classroom at age 17, and has not stopped learning since. New York Times bestselling author Tara Westover addressed the Saint Mary’s community Wednesday evening during the annual Christian Culture Lecture, and spoke to her path to becoming educated. College president Katie Conboy facilitated the discussion which was live streamed to the College’s website. Westover spoke to the importance of surrounding oneself with people from different backgrounds — whether that be religiously, politically or otherwise. “I benefited tremendously from my experience [at Brigham Young University] as it was the first time in my life I had access to people from all over the United States,” she said. Westover attributed some of her biggest moments of education through conversations she had with her peers at Oxford who shared different opinions and beliefs especially regarding hot issue topics such as homophobia.“Sometimes I think we get confused about what education is,” Westover said. “We think it’s about finding a bunch of facts, we think that an educated person is a person who can regurgitate a whole bunch of information. When in reality education, in its best form, is curiosity.”According to Westover, this curiosity changes how you interact with people you disagree with.“I think if you’re an educated person what you’re really trying to get is the ability to see things from another point of view and see the world from different perspectives, and understand why people are the way they are even if they’re not like you.”Westover acknowledged that a part of learning is understanding boundaries before purposefully breaking them. “The fact of the matter is that you can’t be a great writer if you’re too much of a stickler about punctuation,” she said. “But if you don’t understand why the rules exist, you can’t be any kind of writer.”Westover compared the cycle of education and relationships with professors to that of children and parents. “First you adore them, then you hate them and then you respect them”, she said.“… You can really only start to be your own person when you get to a perspective that says that they [parents, professors] are neither always right, nor always wrong.”Through her experiences of imposter syndrome and abuse, Westover cultivated the emotional resilience she has today. “Abuse totally collapses your sense of self,” she said. “What gets attacked is your sense of self and sense of self worth.” Regarding feelings of not belonging in the academic sphere, Westover advised remembering that everyone else similarly feels out of place. “I also think it helps to know that everyone feels overwhelmed, and it always gets better,” she said. “Your life would be very boring if nothing ever intimidated you. The panic you’re feeling? That’s actually stretching, and it’s a good thing and it eventually goes away.”Conboy added that while much of Westover’s story is unique to her, many of the questions fielded by students for the evening came from a place of lived experiences influenced by what they had read in Westover’s memoir.Westover used the analogy of an emotional keyboard to explain how individuals can grow through trauma and develop empathy for themselves in order to play any note on the keyboard they want. “Trying to have empathy for yourself is one of the hardest things to do and it’s one of the most important things to do,” she said. “If you can’t empathize with younger versions of yourself you’re going to find that in your life you’re going be much harsher with people than you need to be, because they remind you of younger versions of yourself. You’re going to end up living half a life — a life with half of your emotions.” Given that the Christian Culture Lecture was created for an individual in the humanities to speak on the influence of Christianity on culture, Westover spoke to how she sees faith align with education. “I think that when I was younger, faith was almost kind of a mechanism of my education,” she said. “I learned how to read largely so I could read the scriptures. I learned to write from the scriptures.”Westover acknowledged the bible as a complex work with a complex style of writing, and attributed that training of reading and rereading things she did not totally understand to her later success in her studies.  She then went on to discuss the role a belief system plays in education. “Toward the end of my time at BYU, I began to realize I didn’t actually believe in some of the things I had previously believed in,” Westover said. “The thing about beliefs that we forget sometimes is that they are often not choices. You can’t decide what you believe. I really struggled to accept that my beliefs had changed and I kind of just didn’t want to deal with it.Westover then changed the way she considered the way she considered the world around her.“Eventually what happened is that I did come to accept it, and I had to start reconstructing a new ethical world for myself.”The lecture concluded with talk on the pandemic, and Westover spoke to the privilege she experiences as her daily life has been minimally affected by the pandemic. “The effects of the pandemic are going to hit people disproportionately based on race, education level, socioeconomic status,” she said. “I just hope it makes us more alive and awake to the fact that we do have, in some ways two Americas, two circles of living.”Tags: Christian Culture Lecture, educated, tara westoverlast_img read more

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