Giorgio Moroder, Armand Van Helden & More To Bring The 70’s To ‘I Feel Love’ Event

first_imgOn September 9 and 10, New York is going back in time, to when nightlife was about more than which club had the most lasers, who bought the biggest bottles, and which superstar DJ the crowd would be Instagramming. ‘I Feel Love’ promises to transport attendees to the disco era, promising a ‘groundbreaking immersive experience’ that sounds like Studio 54 mixed with Sleep No More in an abandoned warehouse in Brooklyn.Details about the mysterious event are scarce, but it is not for the faint of heart. Potential ticket buyers are warned “this event is not recommended for attendees who are not comfortable standing, walking, climbing stairs, being touched, interacting with participants, or being alone”. A warning like makes you wonder what exactly may be in store for the evening.While ‘I Feel Love’ is focusing on the experience, it doesn’t mean the line-ups aren’t completely stacked. Headlining both nights is legendary disco pioneer Giorgio Moroder, responsible for the event’s namesake track ‘I Feel Love’, along with a slew of hits including ‘Hot Stuff’, ‘Bad Girls’, ‘Last Dance’, ‘On The Radio’, ‘Flashdance…What A Feeling’, and, more recently his Daft Punk collaboration, ‘Giorgio by Moroder’. If you listened to music in the 70’s or watched a movie in the 80’s (Scarface, Top Gun) – you heard Giorgio. Supporting him are the likes of Armand Van Helden, Jackmaster, Soul Clap, Oliver, and former Studio 54 resident Nicky Siano.Tickets for this once in a lifetime event are available now at the official website.last_img read more

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The Doobie Brothers Announce First Ever Full-Album Shows At NYC’s Beacon Theatre

first_imgThe Doobie Brothers have announced a pair of very special performances at New York City’s historic Beacon Theatre. On November 15th and 16th, the band will deliver their first ever full-album performances. On Thursday, November 15th, The Doobie Brothers will perform their 1972 sophomore studio album, Toulouse Street, in its entirety. The following night, Friday, November 16th, the band will perform their third studio album, 1973’s The Captain and Me. Both nights’ performances will be supplemented by select Doobie Brothers hits.Tickets for both shows go on sale Mon, July 23rd at 10 a.m. (ET). Fans will have first access to tickets for both nights starting tomorrow, July 17th, at 10 a.m. local time using the code DOOBIESNYC. American Express card members will have pre-sale access Wednesday, July 18th, at 10 a.m. (local).A limited number of special VIP packages will also be available, including premium seating, a pre-show meet and greet with the band, exclusive commemorative merchandise, and more.Tonight, July 16th, The Doobie Brothers will wrap up their summer co-headlining tour with Steely Dan in Holmdel, New Jersey. For more information about the Beacon shows or to see a full list of The Doobie Brothers’ upcoming tour dates, head to the band’s website.last_img read more

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Excellence honored

first_imgThe American Political Science Association (APSA) has recognized three Harvard affiliates for excellence in the study, teaching, and practice of politics.Beth A. Simmons, director of the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and Clarence Dillon Professor of International Affairs in Harvard’s Department of Government, has won the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award for her interdisciplinary book “Mobilizing for Human Rights: International Law in Domestic Politics.”The award, supported by the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, is given annually by APSA for the best book published in the United States during the previous calendar year on government, politics, or international affairs.Simmons’ book, which argues that international human rights law has made a positive contribution to the realization of human rights in much of the world, also won the American Society for International Law’s 2010 certificate of merit for a pre-eminent contribution to creative scholarship. “Mobilizing for Human Rights” is remarkable in that interdisciplinary work rarely satisfies both disciplines, yet the book has garnered accolades from professional associations in law and politics.“I think it is a good signal that strict disciplinary lines are breaking down and open minds are prevailing in many scholarly societies,” said Simmons.Also being receiving awards from APSA are Steven J. Kelman, the Albert J. Weatherhead III & Richard W. Weatherhead Professor of Public Management in the Kennedy School of Government, and Mikhail Pryadilnikov, associate of the Kathryn W. and Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies.Kelman received the John Gaus Award and Lectureship to honor a lifetime of exemplary scholarship in the joint tradition of political science and public administration, and to recognize achievement and encourage scholarship in public administration. Pryadilnikov has won the Leonard D. White Award, supported by the University of Chicago, for the best doctoral dissertation in the field of public administration. His dissertation is titled “The State and Markets in Russia: Understanding the Development of Bureaucratic Implementation Capacities Through the Study of Regulatory Reform, 2001-2008.”Kelman, Pryadilnikov, and Simmons will receive their awards at the 2010 APSA annual meeting in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 2.last_img read more

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Junior named Truman Scholar

first_imgKatherine Warren ’13 has been named a Truman Scholar for the state of Washington. The award, which provides up to $30,000 for graduate school, is given annually to students from approximately 50 U.S. colleges and universities.An anthropology concentrator, Warren is a founding director of a Boston young women’s mentoring program and of the Akili Initiative, an online student think tank for global health. Her interests in women’s rights and health policy have led her to work on gender and disability in Bangladesh, mental health among American Indians, and research on violence against women for the United Nations. In her free time, she loves hiking and violin music.For more information on the scholars.last_img

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Observer announces new editorial board

first_imgSeven new editors will join The Observer’s Editorial Board in 2012-13 and two current editors will retain their positions, incoming Editor-in-Chief Allan Joseph announced Sunday. Juniors Chris Allen, Jillian Barwick, John Cameron, Kristen Durbin, Sarah O’Connor and Suzanna Pratt, along with sophomore Kevin Noonan, will assume their positions on the Editorial Board after Spring Break. Junior Brandon Keelean will return as Graphics Editor, while sophomore Meghan Thomassen will return as Viewpoint Editor. Allen, an Alumni Hall resident and native of East Brunswick, N.J., will serve as Sports Editor. An accounting major, Allen covered the Notre Dame hockey team on its Frozen Four run in 2011 and coordinated The Observer’s coverage of interhall football in 2010. Barwick, a communication studies major at Saint Mary’s College, hails from Wayne, N.J. and lives in LeMans Hall. Barwick will serve as Saint Mary’s Editor after a year of covering Saint Mary’s news for The Observer. Cameron and Durbin will take over as news editors. Cameron is a finance and political science major currently studying abroad in London. A resident of Keough Hall and native of Rolling Meadows, Ill., Cameron has significant experience covering student government and reporting on campus-community relations. Durbin originally hails from Prospect Heights, Ill., and lives in Walsh Hall. The American Studies and Arts and Letters preprofessional studies major has extensive experience with “ND Minute,” The Observer’s news video blog. She also covered organized-labor issues at Eddy Street Commons. O’Connor, a McGlinn Hall resident and native of Omaha, Neb., will serve as Multimedia Editor. A junior computer science major, O’Connor is also a member of The Observer’s Photography Department and has spent significant time upgrading the multimedia section of The Observer’s website. Pratt is an anthropology and peace studies major hailing from Seattle, Wash., and a resident of Pangborn Hall. Pratt has been The Observer’s lead hockey photographer and covered the campus-wide celebration following the death of Osama bin Laden. Pratt is currently studying abroad in Australia and will take over the photo department when she returns in the fall.last_img read more

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Westover talks faith, emotional resilience during Christian Culture Lecture

first_imgGenevieve Coleman | The Observer At an outdoor Christian Culture Lecture viewing event, President Katie Conboy addressed students prior to the pre-recorded lecture.She walked into her first formal classroom at age 17, and has not stopped learning since. New York Times bestselling author Tara Westover addressed the Saint Mary’s community Wednesday evening during the annual Christian Culture Lecture, and spoke to her path to becoming educated. College president Katie Conboy facilitated the discussion which was live streamed to the College’s website. Westover spoke to the importance of surrounding oneself with people from different backgrounds — whether that be religiously, politically or otherwise. “I benefited tremendously from my experience [at Brigham Young University] as it was the first time in my life I had access to people from all over the United States,” she said. Westover attributed some of her biggest moments of education through conversations she had with her peers at Oxford who shared different opinions and beliefs especially regarding hot issue topics such as homophobia.“Sometimes I think we get confused about what education is,” Westover said. “We think it’s about finding a bunch of facts, we think that an educated person is a person who can regurgitate a whole bunch of information. When in reality education, in its best form, is curiosity.”According to Westover, this curiosity changes how you interact with people you disagree with.“I think if you’re an educated person what you’re really trying to get is the ability to see things from another point of view and see the world from different perspectives, and understand why people are the way they are even if they’re not like you.”Westover acknowledged that a part of learning is understanding boundaries before purposefully breaking them. “The fact of the matter is that you can’t be a great writer if you’re too much of a stickler about punctuation,” she said. “But if you don’t understand why the rules exist, you can’t be any kind of writer.”Westover compared the cycle of education and relationships with professors to that of children and parents. “First you adore them, then you hate them and then you respect them”, she said.“… You can really only start to be your own person when you get to a perspective that says that they [parents, professors] are neither always right, nor always wrong.”Through her experiences of imposter syndrome and abuse, Westover cultivated the emotional resilience she has today. “Abuse totally collapses your sense of self,” she said. “What gets attacked is your sense of self and sense of self worth.” Regarding feelings of not belonging in the academic sphere, Westover advised remembering that everyone else similarly feels out of place. “I also think it helps to know that everyone feels overwhelmed, and it always gets better,” she said. “Your life would be very boring if nothing ever intimidated you. The panic you’re feeling? That’s actually stretching, and it’s a good thing and it eventually goes away.”Conboy added that while much of Westover’s story is unique to her, many of the questions fielded by students for the evening came from a place of lived experiences influenced by what they had read in Westover’s memoir.Westover used the analogy of an emotional keyboard to explain how individuals can grow through trauma and develop empathy for themselves in order to play any note on the keyboard they want. “Trying to have empathy for yourself is one of the hardest things to do and it’s one of the most important things to do,” she said. “If you can’t empathize with younger versions of yourself you’re going to find that in your life you’re going be much harsher with people than you need to be, because they remind you of younger versions of yourself. You’re going to end up living half a life — a life with half of your emotions.” Given that the Christian Culture Lecture was created for an individual in the humanities to speak on the influence of Christianity on culture, Westover spoke to how she sees faith align with education. “I think that when I was younger, faith was almost kind of a mechanism of my education,” she said. “I learned how to read largely so I could read the scriptures. I learned to write from the scriptures.”Westover acknowledged the bible as a complex work with a complex style of writing, and attributed that training of reading and rereading things she did not totally understand to her later success in her studies.  She then went on to discuss the role a belief system plays in education. “Toward the end of my time at BYU, I began to realize I didn’t actually believe in some of the things I had previously believed in,” Westover said. “The thing about beliefs that we forget sometimes is that they are often not choices. You can’t decide what you believe. I really struggled to accept that my beliefs had changed and I kind of just didn’t want to deal with it.Westover then changed the way she considered the way she considered the world around her.“Eventually what happened is that I did come to accept it, and I had to start reconstructing a new ethical world for myself.”The lecture concluded with talk on the pandemic, and Westover spoke to the privilege she experiences as her daily life has been minimally affected by the pandemic. “The effects of the pandemic are going to hit people disproportionately based on race, education level, socioeconomic status,” she said. “I just hope it makes us more alive and awake to the fact that we do have, in some ways two Americas, two circles of living.”Tags: Christian Culture Lecture, educated, tara westoverlast_img read more

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Cynthia Nixon-Directed Steve Extends Off-Broadway

first_img Related Shows View Comments The world premiere of Mark Gerrard’s Steve will extend off-Broadway through January 3, 2016; the production had previously been set to shutter on December 27. Directed by Cynthia Nixon and starring Matt McGrath, Mario Cantone, Jerry Dixon, Malcolm Gets and more, the show is playing at the Romulus Linney Courtyard Theatre at the Pershing Square Signature Center.Steve follows Steven (McGrath), a failed Broadway chorus boy turned stay-at-home dad. As he celebrates his birthday, he faces fear and uncertainty. He worries that Stephen (Gets), his partner of 14 years, is cheating on him, his best friend is dying of cancer and he questions what he’s done with his life.The cast also includes Ashlie Atkinson and Francisco Pryor Garat.The New Group production officially opened on November 18. Steve Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 3, 2016last_img read more

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Seminars to Educate Business Advisors about Employee Ownership

first_imgSeminars to Educate Business Advisors about Employee OwnershipBurlington, Vermont (August 19, 2008) — The Vermont Employee Ownership Center (VEOC) will be holding seminars in three locations around the state designed to educate business advisors about the basics of employee ownership.Designed for attorneys, CPAs, bankers, trust officers, and other professional advisors, ESOPs & Succession Planning: A Technical Introduction to Employee Ownership for Business Advisors will give attendees the tools necessary to advise their clients about employee ownership as an option for their business succession plan.The seminars will be held at the following locations:” September 18th at the Doubletree Hotel in Burlington (8:00 am to 10:30 am)” October 7th at the Brattleboro Savings & Loan in Brattleboro (2:30 pm to 5:00 pm)” October 21st at the Inn at Willow Pond in Manchester (2:30 pm to 5:00 pm)The cost for attending is $40 ($25 for additional attendees from the same firm). Refreshments will be served. More information and online registration is available at www.veoc.org(link is external).The speaker is Stephen P. Magowan, of Steiker, Fischer, Edwards & Greenapple, P.C., a Philadelphia-based law firm with a national practice focusing principally on ESOPs and ESOP transactions, and of SES Advisors, Inc., a financial consulting firm that specializes in analyzing and finding financing for ESOP transactions.The Vermont Employee Ownership Center is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting and fostering employee ownership. The group’s goals are to broaden capital ownership, deepen employee participation, retain local ownership of businesses and the jobs they support, increase living standards for working families, and stabilize communities. VEOC works directly with owners interested in selling their business to their employees, employee groups interested in purchasing a business, and entrepreneurs who wish to start a company with broadly-shared ownership. For more information, visit www.veoc.org(link is external).________________________________________This project is funded by a grant from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). SBAs funding should not be construed as an endorsement of any products, opinions, or services. All SBA-funded projects are extended to the public on a nondiscriminatory basis. Reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities will be made if requested at least two weeks in advance. Contact Jon Crystal at 802-861-6611.last_img read more

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Saint Michael’s physicist receives $50,000 US Dept of Energy grant

first_imgAlain Brizard of Essex JunctionSaint Michael’s physicist receives $50,000 US Dept of Energy grant to support his research in plasma dynamicsAlain Brizard, associate professor of physics at Saint Michael’s College, has received a $50,000 research grant from the US Department of Energy, under the program Theoretical Research in Magnetic Fusion Energy Science, to support his research activities during his sabbatical leave from October 2008 to June 2009.The title of his project, “Nonlinear finite-Larmor-radius effects in reduced fluid models,” involves collaborations with physicists at Dartmouth College during the fall of 2008, as well with as the French laboratory CEA/Cadarache near Aix-en-Provence, where Brizard will spend part of his sabbatical leave from January to June 2009. Brizard’s work focuses on the derivation of nonlinear fluid equations suitable for the analysis of complex plasma dynamics by powerful computer simulations which he will carry out on computers at Dartmouth College.A member of the faculty of Saint Michael’s since 2000, Professor Brizard was a physicist in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and was with the physics department at the University of California, Berkeley, from 1994 until coming to Saint Michael’s. He earned his doctorate in astrophysical sciences from Princeton University in 1990.Dr. Brizard and his wife Dinah and their teen-aged son reside in Essex Junction.Saint Michael’s College, www.smcvt.edu(link is external), founded in 1904 by the Society of St. Edmund and headed by President John J. Neuhauser, is identified by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s Best 368 Colleges. A liberal arts, residential, Catholic college, Saint Michael’s is located just outside of Burlington, Vermont, one of America’s top college towns, and less than two hours from Montreal. As one of only 270 institutions nationwide with a prestigious Phi Beta Kappa chapter on campus, Saint Michael’s has 2,000 full-time undergraduate students, some 500 graduate students and 200 international students. In recent years Saint Michael’s students and professors have received Rhodes, Woodrow Wilson, Guggenheim, Fulbright, National Science Foundation and other grants, and Saint Michael’s professors have been named Vermont Professor of the Year in four of the last eight years. The college is currently listed as one of the nation’s Best Liberal Arts Colleges in the 2009 U.S. News & World Report rankings.-30-last_img read more

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On the wild side

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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