Post Doctoral Associate (43090)

first_imgThe Anita Zucker Center for Excellence in Early Childhood Studiesis a campus-wide interdisciplinary center located at the Universityof Florida, administratively housed in the College of Education.Major UF collaborators include the College of Education, College ofMedicine and the Health Sciences Center, the College of PublicHealth and Health Professions, the College of Liberal Arts andSciences, and the Office of Human Resource Services. The Center isseeking applications from those interested in a post-doctoralassociate position.Job description: Coordinate and collaborate with Centerpersonnel on existing Center projects (including research studies,training, and technical assistance projects); supervise graduateresearch assistants and other staff associated with Centerprojects; engage in research and scholarship activities; engage indissemination activities, including scholarly reports andpublications; and perform other relevant Center and professionalservice activities.Expectations: This position is a 12-month, non-tenure track,grant-funded position with an initial appointment of 1 year thatcan continue for up to 4 years. This position is a time limitedposition and continuation of this appointment is contingent uponthe availability of funding, Center needs, and satisfactoryperformance in the position.All applicants must hold a minimum of a doctoral degree in earlychildhood education, early childhood special education, child andfamily studies, or a related field.Preferred applicants will have demonstrated skills in implementingresearch, training, or technical assistance projects and theability to produce verbal and written communication appropriate fora range of audiences, including scholarly reports and publications.Candidates should have demonstrated interpersonal skills thatfoster teamwork and collaboration, the ability to work effectivelyindividually and as part of a team; and the ability to coordinatemultiple projects and staff.Candidates must be supportive of the mission and goals of the AnitaZucker Center for Excellence in Early Childhood Studies. Candidatesmust have the desire and ability to foster and engage ininterdisciplinary, collaborative research, training, or technicalassistance.Candidates with experiences managing research data sets, knowledgeof a range of research methodologies (group experimental,correlational, single-subject experimental, qualitative), advanceddata analysis skills, and competencies with advanced statisticalsoftware are desirable.Applications must include a cover letter, resume or curriculumvitae, and a list of four references.Review of applications will begin on February 5, 2019. Applicationsreceived after this date will be considered at the discretion ofthe search committee.Selected candidate will be required to provide an officialtranscript to the hiring department upon hire. A transcript willnot be considered “official” if a designation of “Issued toStudent” is visible. Degrees earned from an educational institutionoutside of the United States are required to be evaluated by aprofessional credentialing service provider approved by NationalAssociation of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES).If an accommodation due to a disability is needed to apply for thisposition, please call 352-392-2477 or the Florida Relay System at800-955-8771 (TDD). Hiring is contingent upon eligibility to workin the US. Searches are conducted in accordance with Florida’sSunshine Law.The University of Florida is committed to non-discrimination withrespect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex,sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, marital status,national origin, political opinions or affiliations, geneticinformation and veteran status in all aspects of employmentincluding recruitment, hiring, promotions, transfers, discipline,terminations, wage and salary administration, benefits, andtraining.last_img read more

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Restaurant Review: La Tasca

first_imgIf La Tasca still doesn’t appeal, then don’t rule out the Oxford Castle as a place to find good restaurants. Rather similar to the Duke of York Square on the Kings Road, it is very nicely laid out and all the restaurants have large outdoor seating areas. It would definitely be worth looking at the divine Carluccio’s, or the up and coming pizza chain Prezzo, to name but two. Such was my lack of faith in restaurant reviews that I was prompted to try the tapas restaurant La Tasca at the Oxford Castle, despite its measly two out of five stars in the Oxford Handbook.  Actually, the 40% off voucher was quite an incentive too. Toast and tea does get dull. Having rounded up some friends at short notice, we searched through the maze that is the Oxford Castle and eventually found La Tasca. The waitress managed that almost impossible combination of being friendly but unobtrusive and the menu was very extensive, although many dishes were so similar that it seemed unnecessary to put them all on.  Obviously being spoilt for choice in a restaurant is no bad thing, but students on a tight budget be warned.  It is all too easy to get carried away. As the table next to us belatedly realised, ordering three dishes per person is more than sufficient.     After a jug of slightly watery Sangria, we kicked off with some delicious, although somewhat unseasoned, calamari. Most of us ordered typical chorizo and potato dishes, although one friend sampled the vegetarian section. Perhaps the chorizo lacked its usual fiery flavour, but the sauces and seasonings more than made up for that. The vegetables in particular were very well prepared.  All restaurants should take heed of the fact that simple dishes are an essential staple and should not be overlooked.  Without our discount, we would have paid around £60, which would be £15 each. So perhaps not the cheapest of restaurants, but definitely good fun.   La Tasca serves up far more generous portions and a generally more authentic approach to Mediterranean cuisine than most Tapas restaurants.  They do not go for the ‘one-bite-and-it’s-gone’ style dishes, merely for the sake of presentation.last_img read more

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Tree Seedlings Giveaway in O.C. on April 1

first_imgLoretta Harris holds up two bayberry tree seedlings that she got during the 2018 seedling giveaway. Free tree seedlings will be available to Ocean City residents on April 1 as part of the New Jersey Tree Recovery Campaign. This program helps communities replace trees damaged or destroyed by Superstorm Sandy.From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, April 1, residents will be able to pick up tree seedlings at City Hall (861 Asbury Avenue), the Ocean City Community Center (1735 Simpson Avenue) or the 46th Street Welcome Center (46th Street and West Avenue).Seedlings, available on a first-come, first-served basis, also come with instructions on how to store, care for, and plant them. The guides help residents choose the right place on a property to plant a tree while keeping in mind the tree’s full-grown size in the future. Residents should plant the seedlings within two days after pick-up in order to prevent the roots from drying out.The Ocean City School District also will distribute seedlings to students on Monday.The goal of the Tree Recovery Campaign is to distribute 600,000 tree seedlings to New Jersey residents over the course of six years. It is a joint effort between Ocean City, the New Jersey Forest Service, New Jersey Soil Conservation Districts, Sustainable Jersey, Arbor Day Foundation, BJ’s Wholesale Club, Canon, and FedEx.When properly planted and maintained, trees can be assets to a community. They improve the visual appeal of a neighborhood or business district, increase property values, reduce home cooling costs, remove air pollutants, and provide wildlife habitat, among many other benefits.For a list of all distribution locations across the state, visit www.forestry.nj.gov  or www.facebook.com/newjerseyforests.last_img read more

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Muffin solutions

first_imgA leading UK bakery manufacturer and supplier of bakery components, Baking Solutions, has recently purchased a complete muffin-processing unit worth £100,000 from specialist depositing technology manufacturer Turbo Systems.Baking Solutions, based in Oxfordshire, had won a major contract from a leading customer to supply muffins for over 300 outlets across the UK and required a new injection system to meet increased demand and to provide its customer with high-quality products. A range of flavoured muffins, including blueberry, chocolate chip and lemon, were included in the deal.familiarityHaving been in close contact with Turbo Systems for around four years, Baking Solutions turned to the equipment company to supply all the main components of the processing line.So that it could meet the retailer’s supply requirements on deadline, Turbo Systems initially loaned Baking Solutions a D152 depositor, before the main injection unit was installed. The first system, now incorporated onto Baking Solutions’ existing oven system, is an eight-across muffin injection unit and the second machine is an off-line system, comprising a six-across mini monoblock depositor and indexing conveyor.In operation, the muffin batter is deposited in rows of four onto baking trays, and then conveyed into the oven. After the muffins have been baked and come off the cooler, the baking trays are indexed, two at a time, and the various sauce flavours and textures are injected into the muffins.Baking Solutions special projects manager Andy Bastable, says: “The muffin line is now working to full capacity and its performance is excellent. It’s very compact, freeing up factory floor space, and the throughputs are very high. Also, the back-up service and training have been a real bonus.”lengthy experienceTurbo Systems has been a provider of bespoke equipment solutions to the baking industry for over 50 years. Its machine range includes cutting units, coating and decorating nozzles, and a whole range of depositors.Baking Solutions has been trading within the baking industry for over 10 years and has a 70,000sq ft nut-free bakery facility in the heart of Oxfordshire. It maintains ’A grade’ BRC accreditation and produces branded, own-label and third-party bakery lines for the market.last_img read more

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In Short

first_imgFree-from successFinsbury Foods said that falling sales in its cake business has resulted in a 2% drop in revenue for the 17 weeks to the end of October. Its bread and free-from businesses achieved double-digit growth, with its acquisition of Goswell Bakeries contributing to an 11% growth in sales. Like-for-like sales in the division increased 8%.Heinz sells dessertsUS-based food company Heinz has completed the sale of its private-label frozen desserts business in the UK, to newly formed firm PoleStar Foods. The sale comprises two plants in Okehampton and Leamington Spa employing 580 staff. The transaction will result in a $33m (£19.93m) pre-tax loss during the third quarter.Nero seeks growthCaffè Nero plans to more than double its presence overseas, according to Emirates Business. Speaking to the UAE business publication in Dubai recently, founder Gerry Ford said the coffee chain was eyeing up growth opportunities in China, the US, central and eastern Europe, Scandinavia and the GCC, and hopes to increase its 400 stores to a projected 1,000.Raisins raise importsCalifornia Raisins has imported a record-breaking tonnage into the UK. The first quarter of the 2009/10 crop year has seen 11,416mt imported 51% more than the first quarter of the 2008/09 crop year and higher than any previous years.Britvic increaseBritvic has announced a group revenue increase of 5.6% from £926.5m to £978.8m in its full-year results to 27 September 2009. The firm achieved volume and value share gains across its six core brands: Pepsi, 7Up, Tango, Robinsons, J2O and Fruit Shoot.last_img read more

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Jay board approves Public Works hiring, town meeting timeline

first_imgJAY – The Board of Selectpersons approved the hiring of a full-time employee for the Public Works Department at Wednesday’s meeting, in an effort to meet staffing needs in advance of the winter season.The department is smaller than it has been in the past to begin with, down from 13 employees to nine, counting the mechanic and Highway Foreman John Johnson, and has two employees that are either on, or soon will be on, medical leave. With 95 miles of road to plow, Johnson said, seven people simply wouldn’t be able to do the job.The board voted to advertise for a full-time position on the department. In addition to covering for people on medical leave, that new position will help a department that has a couple of people nearing retirement. The position may not be easy to fill; Johnson warned the board that a number of similar positions remained unfilled across the state.The board also authorized town officials to close the transfer station if necessary, to allow the employees there to plow roads. All of those employees are now on the same contract as Public Works and have the appropriate licenses, so Johnson said that wouldn’t be an issue. Department employees going off payroll meant that there would be adequate funding to cover the position.Town Manager Shiloh LaFreniere said that the town office would work to alert the public and coordinate with Archie’s when closings were necessary.“There’s a lot of moving pieces to keep track of,” Johnson said. “It’s going to get done but it’s not getting done with seven people.”The board also approved a timeline for the 2020 budget process that would conclude with the annual town meeting referendum on April 28. An initial workshop would be held with members of the Budget Committee and the Board of Selectpersons, followed by a more formal meeting and vote. Grant and program funding requests will only be accepted from organizations previously funded by Jay, similar to the process over the last few years.The town does need people to serve on the Budget Committee, as well as the Paving Committee. Interested residents should contact the town office.last_img read more

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Cush Jumbo on Her New Buddy Hugh Jackman & the ‘Shocking’ Drama The River

first_img Hometown: London, England “It’s hard to describe The River without giving anything away. You’re going to laugh and cry and be happy and sad—and you’re going to be shocked. Let’s just say you’re going to have quite an immersive experience for 85 minutes!” “I love having my own place in midtown like a proper grown-up. I was born and bred in a city, so I’m most at home when I can see the lights and hear the cabs going by in the middle of the night. New York is a spiritual place for me.” Age: 29 View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Feb. 8, 2015 “I’m the second of six children, and we’re all about two years apart, so [life at home] was kind of busy, but I always had a ready-made audience. I started working on stage as a dancer when I was four; by 14 or 15, I knew I wanted to study the craft of acting.” “With a name like Cush Jumbo, you never get forgotten. The ‘Jumbo’ is from my father, who is Nigerian, and ‘Cush’ was a king in ancient Egypt. It’s a name that took a few years to grow into, but now I feel it was meant to be. It’s absolutely who I am, and I love it.”center_img “When you’re working with a big star you always wonder what it’s going to be like. Hugh Jackman puts you at ease within 10 minutes. He has such a wonderful energy and is so generous when you’re doing a scene. He’s just so funny and friendly and playful—he instantly becomes your friend.” “Playing Mark Antony in Julius Caesar was the most thrilling thing I’ve done. You get these speeches that were written for men, and you’re running around like an action hero, climbing scaffolding and beating people up. It was very freeing.” The River Stage Cred: A rising star of the British stage, Jumbo won raves as Mark Antony in an all-female Julius Caesar (which transferred to St. Ann’s Warehouse in Brooklyn last year), Nora in A Doll’s House, Rosalind in As You Like It and Josephine Baker in her self-penned solo show Josephine and I. Related Shows Current Role: A Broadway debut as “The Woman,” who accompanies her new boyfriend (Hugh Jackman) to a remote cabin for night of fly-fishing in Jez Butterworth’s mysterious drama The River.last_img read more

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Guatemalan Army Fights Transnational Crime with Renovated Armored Vehicles

first_imgShortly thereafter in mid-2013, Guatemala created its Marine Infantry Brigade and the Tecún Umán IATF. The effort received international support, including backing from the United States, which has donated 82 Jeep J8 armored vehicles, 25 pick-ups and nine trucks for the Tecún Umán and Chortí IATF units. Those vehicles have been continuously deployed in the fight against drug cartels, human smugglers and transnational criminal organizations; their speed and maneuverability on uneven terrain in border areas have made them integral to the Task Forces and the Army’s success, according to Colonel Bartres García. International cooperation In the early 1980s, at the height of the internal conflict, the Armed Forces devised and produced their own Armored Personnel Carrier (APC), a 4×4 reinforced vehicle called the Armadillo, which resembles the American Commando LAV-100. Also known as the Cusuco, the Armadillo was ideal for urban warfare and for flat terrains in certain areas of the country. It could be equipped with .50 manually operated turrets, and, more importantly, could resist the guerrillas’ rocket propelled grenades (RPGs). Since then, on January 23, a Tecún Umán IATF-led operation resulted in the interdiction of 12.7 tons of amphetamines valued at nearly $1.2 billion. Troops found the drugs in a shack in the city of La Blanca, in the department of San Marcos, which borders Mexico. In just a few months after its creation, the Tecún Umán IATF, which has a fleet of 42 J8s, dismantled nine criminal structures in the northern part of the country before dealing several more blows against international smugglers and drug traffickers in 2014. From 1996 — the year the Guatemalan Civil War ended — until 2014, the use of armored vehicles by the Guatemalan Army declined considerably, Colonel Bartres García said. Guatemala’s Marine Infantry Brigade, the Tecún Umán Inter Agency Task Force (IATF), and the Chortí IATF have used a fleet of modified light armored vehicles and Toyota pick-up trucks to strike several major blows against organized crime groups that traffic drugs and humans through the country’s borders with Mexico and Honduras. The Guatemalan Armed Forces armored and modified the trucks. “The monopoly of force that the State has accrued with these vehicles has significantly contributed to our mission,” Colonel Ader Bartres García, Commander of the Armed Forces’ Marine Infantry Brigade, said on July 1 during a presentation at the 4th Annual Latin America Armored Vehicles Conference, in Bogotá, Colombia. Use of armored vehicles declined after civil conflict ended By Dialogo July 23, 2015 What use are armies? To provoke underdevelopment in countries, kill innocent people, now for drug traffickers, how nice, isn’t it. Crime in Latin America is a dangerous reality for those who are healthy and productive. The problem in Venezuela is not related to war, what bothers us is the lack of food. The Guatemalan Army, working together with the Navy, Air Force, and National Police, is using a fleet of renovated armored vehicles to combat transnational crime and guard the country’s borders. Meanwhile in southern Guatemala, the Chortí IATF, whose fleet is made up of 46 J8s, has teamed with their Honduran counterparts as part of the binational Maya-Chortí Task Force. The collaboration reaped success in April 2015, about a month after it was formed, when forces captured 15 suspects and identified 62 drug and human-trafficking routes used by criminal organizations in the border region. The Army used Armadillos until the end of the Civil War, when the government reduced its budget and Troop numbers; it didn’t need armored vehicles again until around 2012, when drug-trafficking organizations, including some Mexican cartels such as Los Zetas and La Familia Michoacana, increased their operations in Guatemala, using the country as a transshipment point for drug loads from South America. The new threats posed by these transnational criminal organizations prompted the government to considerably increase the Army’s size and budget, and to create inter-institutional groups capable of guaranteeing public security in border departments such as Petén, San Marcos, Huehuetenango, Quiché, El Progreso, Chiquimula and Izabal. last_img read more

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Turnaround Chef Johndavid Hensley Spins Pub Into Blue Oyster Seafood & Oyster Bar

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The newest addition to Long Island’s restaurant scene is Blue Oyster Seafood & Oyster Bar, a white-tablecloth restaurant that debuted last month where sports bar Bottoms Up once stood in downtown Islip.Executive Chef Johndavid Hensley, a veteran in the restaurant industry, touts classic dishes with contemporary flair and a focus on featuring local and regional ingredients.“My oysters and clams are pretty much dug right here in our backyard,” says Hensley, sitting in a booth as members of the dining staff began setting tables for the dinner rush on a recent Monday.Fitting the restaurant’s motif, blue light floods the dimly lit dining room accented by bright white tablecloths and nautical decals. Techno music thumping in the background completes the nightclub feel. Hensley takes a positive, hands-on approach in managing the kitchen.“I never really tell anybody here what to do,” he says. “I tell them why and how to do it, so they themselves can make discoveries. I want to inspire and empower.”Hensley, who grew up in the Hamptons, got his start in the restaurant business at an early age.“My family, we’re restaurant people,” he says. “So I grew up with it in my blood. I just fell in love with the job and the environment.”He worked his way up the ranks at Hampton Bays’ now-defunct Indian Cove Restaurant and Marina, where he eventually served as executive chef for more than 15 years. In its heyday, the East End fixture ranked high among LI restaurants, receiving four stars from The New York Times three years in a row. Craving the bright lights and big city, he moved to Manhattan in the late ’90s, and bounced around before securing a position as executive chef of the Russian Tea Room, where he worked from 1998 to 2000.“I got a chance to rub elbows with a lot of political dignitaries,” he recalls. “It helped polish my skills with the service aspect of [the industry]. I fell in love, not just with the food, but also the customers and what they represent.”In the following years, Hensley returned to the Island, and worked at The Montauk Yacht Club, Greek Bites Grill in Southampton and Claudio’s Restaurant in Greenport. While discussing his long career in the restaurant industry, a much younger chef approached the booth at Blue Oyster Bar and asked Hensley for a second opinion on a meatball.“It’s fluffy enough, right? Not so dense?” Hensley says, inspecting the chef’s creation. He later explained it was an “Arthur Avenue meatball,” a Blue Oyster appetizer served with whipped ricotta cheese and named for the Little Italy section of the Bronx. After a brief consultation with the other chef, Hensley says, “All right, run with it.”Throughout the course of his career, Hensley says, skilled chefs often took him under their wing, a practice he’s now adopted. He believes strongly in “paying it forward.”“The kids here, when I give them a recipe, I want them to feel it and touch it,” he says. “I like others to discover what made me smile when I was younger.”Blue Oyster Seafood & Oyster Bar serves up a variety of regional and local seafood along with classic dishes and steaks. Appetizers include baked clams with lemon and thyme ($12) and herb-crusted Tuscan wings served with a curry cream dip. Entrée selections include Montauk swordfish with a honey-sweet potato mash and cranberry chutney ($28); traditional paella with shrimp, clams, mussels and chorizo ($32); and French lobster ravioli. That’s in addition to a full raw bar that features a variety of local oysters served daily.Blue Oyster Seafood & Oyster Bar is located at 524-526 Main St. in Islip. They can be reached at 631-446-4233 or blueoysterlongisland.comlast_img read more

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Americans love their credit cards (for now)

first_img continue reading » Whether they swipe or insert, Americans have a proven tendency to reach for their credit cards over all other payment options. And it’s not just tactile appeal–credit cards exceed debit cards in usage whether it’s online or in-store. Together, credit and debit cards dominate the market as preferred payment types in the US. In online purchases, eWallets are still trailing behind debit cards. Bank transfers, cash on delivery, and pre-pay show little growth over last year among Americans. So, if you haven’t implemented chip technology yet in your credit union’s credit cards, it would be a wise investment against fraud. Americans don’t appear to be giving up their plastic for quite a while.Worldpay found that Americans only spent $2,271 per capita using eCommerce, only 20% of which was via mobile wallet. Ecommerce’s compounding annual growth rate is expected to be 9% in the US between 2018 and 2022, aided by a 79% internet penetration rate as of 2018. Point of sale spend per capita, however, was $24,248 with just 3% coming through mobile wallets. POS CAGR is expected to reach 7% between 2018 and 2022.Americans’ payment habits contrast sharply with other countries. Mobile payments in the US are projected to amount to less than half of eCommerce through 2022. In the UK, however, mobile payments will account for more than half of eCommerce by 2022. Densely populated countries like China and Indonesia are already there. In fact, China’s mobile eCommerce is expected to nearly double desktop by 2022. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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