Automatic Systems Ltd (ASL.mu) 2020 Abridged Report

first_imgAutomatic Systems Ltd (ASL.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Tourism sector has released it’s 2020 abridged results.For more information about Automatic Systems Ltd (ASL.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Automatic Systems Ltd (ASL.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Automatic Systems Ltd (ASL.mu)  2020 abridged results.Company ProfileAutomatic Systems Limited operates a totalisator system for horse racing and football betting. The company runs its operations through is two subsidiaries, Supertote which deals with the horse racing bets and Superscore which deals with the football bets. Automatic System Limited organises this betting platform for the horse racing in liaison with the Mauritius Turf Club in Mauritius. The company also runs this betting platform for soccer in Africa. Automatic Systems Limited is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius.last_img read more

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Can you really survive on the State Pension alone?

first_img Enter Your Email Address Rupert Hargreaves | Saturday, 11th July, 2020 | More on: ^FTMC 5 Stocks For Trying To Build Wealth After 50 Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. See all posts by Rupert Hargreaves Image source: Getty Images Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Rupert Hargreaves has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.center_img Click here to claim your free copy of this special investing report now! Every pensioner is afraid of running out of money in retirement. Unfortunately, many retirees do encounter financial problems, despite the State Pension safety net.According to various studies and surveys, the average retiree needs more than £20,000 a year to live in comfort. That’s assuming they own their property and live a modest life.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…This year, the full new State Pension stands at just over £9,100 a year. That’s less than half the figure most retirees believe they would need to live in comfort.These figures suggest most pensioners cannot afford to survive on the State Pension alone. As such, the best way to avoid financial hardship in old age could be to start your own private pension today.State Pension alternativeOne alternative to the State Pension is to set up a SIPP. These products are fantastic because, unlike workplace or government pension schemes, the owner has complete control. To put it another way, a pensioner should get out as much or more than they put in, and that’s a big positive.SIPPs also come with significant tax benefits. SIPP contributions attract tax relief at your marginal tax rate. That’s 20% for basic rate taxpayers. So, for a basic rate taxpayer contributing £80, the government will add an extra £20 to take the total to £100. Additional tax reliefs are available for higher rate taxpayers.Another benefit of using a SIPP, rather than relying on the State Pension, is the fact that SIPP owners can invest their cash in the stock market. This is a huge bonus.Investing for the futureInvesting your hard-earned money in the stock market could turbocharge the growth of your financial nest-egg. Over the past three-and-a-half decades, the FTSE 250 has produced an average annual return of around 12%.On average, over the past 120 years, UK stocks have yielded an average yearly return of about 7%. This period has included multiple economic depressions and recessions as well as two World Wars. To put it another way, despite encountering multiple setbacks over the past century, UK stocks have produced a steady return for investors.This trend will likely continue during the next few decades. A combination of income and capital growth from UK shares could produce high total returns for investors over the long run.Therefore, by using a SIPP to invest in the stock market, future retirees can decrease their reliance on the State Pension. A contribution of just £80 a month into a SIPP (or £100 including the government top-up) could help build a pension pot worth more than £1m in 40 years. That’s assuming an annual return rate of 12%. This would be enough to provide a yearly income of £40,000 in retirement.All in all, figures suggest the state pension alone may not be enough to live off in retirement. The best way to get around this problem could be to open a SIPP and invest in the stock market. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Markets around the world are reeling from the coronavirus pandemic…And with so many great companies trading at what look to be ‘discount-bin’ prices, now could be the time for savvy investors to snap up some potential bargains.But whether you’re a newbie investor or a seasoned pro, deciding which stocks to add to your shopping list can be daunting prospect during such unprecedented times.Fortunately, The Motley Fool is here to help: our UK Chief Investment Officer and his analyst team have short-listed five companies that they believe STILL boast significant long-term growth prospects despite the global lock-down…You see, here at The Motley Fool we don’t believe “over-trading” is the right path to financial freedom in retirement; instead, we advocate buying and holding (for AT LEAST three to five years) 15 or more quality companies, with shareholder-focused management teams at the helm.That’s why we’re sharing the names of all five of these companies in a special investing report that you can download today for FREE. If you’re 50 or over, we believe these stocks could be a great fit for any well-diversified portfolio, and that you can consider building a position in all five right away. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Can you really survive on the State Pension alone?last_img read more

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Dave Attwood – Bristol’s legal eagle

first_img“There will also be people who say the game’s gone soft. But then there have been people saying that since the Fifties when basically you could carry a machete into contact. There’s nothing soft about 140-kilo Billy Vunipola running into 135-kilo Nathan Hughes.“The reality is that the physical spectacle is as pivotal as it’s ever been. But World Rugby, the RFU, are trying to make the game safer. That comes at a cost sometimes. At the minute I don’t think the cost is too high.”High tackles – like this one by Billy Twelvetrees v Exeter – must be dealt with, says AttwoodAt his previous club Bath, Attwood used to look around the changing room in awe at the quality of the players around him. He is experiencing that with bells on at Bristol.“Semi Radradra and Charles Piutau are two of the best players in the world. And then you can carry on down the list: John Afoa, the world’s greatest veteran, Steve Luatua, one of the best captains I’ve ever worked with, Chris Vui, Ben Earl, Callum Sheedy is playing out of his skin, Piers O’Conor has played almost every game this season and been unbelievable in pretty much all of them.“We’ve got such an abundance of talented players but the really interesting thing is we were missing upwards of 13, 14 of those guys during the Six Nations period and we were still winning, getting bonus points, home and away.“Topping the league speaks to the strength of our squad. But more than the calibre of the players, it speaks to the unity of the team and the alignment of the players with the coaching staff. And how when someone’s unavailable, someone else can perform their role.” Dave Attwood – Bristol’s legal eagleDave Attwood must be classed as a veteran these days but, more than a decade after making his England debut, the 34-year-old second-row is playing as well as ever. His Bristol team demands exacting fitness levels and skill execution but Attwood has met the challenge.The Bears topped the Gallagher Premiership at the end of the regular season and he is confident they can go on to win their first English title, stage one of which is this weekend’s semi-final against Harlequins at Ashton Gate.Attwood is preparing for his post-rugby life by studying law at university and, unusually, he has been using his newly acquired legal knowledge to defend team-mates in disciplinary hearings. We spoke to him about that intriguing sideline, as well as about playing for the Bears, for a feature that was published in our June 2021 issue…Second-row Attwood at the heart of a driving maul against Connacht in Galway last December (Inpho)Disciplinary hearings used to be a sporadic irritation for club bosses. Nowadays, you better be primed for combat in the courtroom. Pat Lam has seen three of his Bristol players summoned by the beak in recent months but fortunately he didn’t have to look far for legal representation. Dave Attwood, an aspiring solicitor advocate, is currently supplementing his outstanding work in the second row with some vigorous defence in RFU tribunals.Siale Piutau, Kyle Sinckler and Sam Bedlow have been the three beneficiaries and, if RW’s interview with Attwood is anything to go by, they couldn’t have a more diligent counsel. The former England lock, studying part-time at university for a law diploma, is even employing his own lecturers to keep on top of his legal studies. On Thursdays and Fridays, he has a two-hour session at 5am with a Sinhalese teacher in Sri Lanka. He’s also doing a couple of hours a week with a London-based graduate on European law.Representing rugby team-mates is a way to gain experience and it goes down well with the RFU, who are not well disposed to high-powered briefs throwing their weight around in a rugby setting. “They’re more concerned about the spirit of these incidents than the specific terminology of the framework,” explains Attwood. Only 80 minutes separate Dave Attwood from a possible Twickenham final. RW talks to the Bristol lock about flying Bears and defending team-mates in disciplinary hearings Around 6,600 fans will be permitted for this Saturday’s Bristol v Harlequins semi-final (Getty Images)Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Roar emotion: Dave Attwood hams it up at a pre-season photo call for Bristol Bears (Getty Images) center_img “So if you’re trying to wriggle out of the incident on a technicality, they can see that happening. If you say, ‘I know I tipped him upside down and he landed on his head and broke his neck but he had his laces undone, so I shouldn’t be culpable’, they can see that’s baloney. So it’s important that players have candour.”It helps that Attwood is at the coalface. So much so that when Sinckler committed his offence at Exeter in January, Attwood was practically standing next to him. “So I was able to convey to the judiciary panel the emotion and the intent and the actual events as they unfolded.”We discuss Sinckler’s case in depth. The England prop was cited for ‘failing to respect the authority of the match official’ after a no-arms tackle on him by Luke Cowan-Dickie. Or to be more specific, after initially saying “Are you kidding?” when Karl Dickson chose not to penalise the tackler, he repeated the sentiment with some added profanity.Lots of hands on hips as referee Karl Dickson talks to Kyle Sinckler et al in the episode at Exeter (Getty)That’s the nub of it but delve deeper and you discover that the incident was similar to one that a few years ago caused Sinckler a season-ending injury. And that perhaps Exeter players had wound him up a little. And that maybe we wouldn’t have even heard the swearing at all if it wasn’t for the absence of a noisy crowd.“To write events down on paper can seem very black and white but actually what we’re dealing with is an awful lot of grey,” explains Attwood. That is demonstrated by the huge number of times he utters the word ‘but’ in our conversation – there invariably seems to be a flip side to every point made.Sinckler received a two-week ban, a week less than Bedlow for his tip tackle on London Irish’s Theo Brophy-Clews. “It’s important for the (charged) player to show remorse. And one of the things they raised with Sam was that it didn’t appear he was sorry about it, he didn’t go and apologise,” says Attwood, switching his attention to his most recent hearing.Sam Bedlow’s tip tackle on Theo Brophy-Clews that brought the Bristol back a three-week ban (Getty)“But first, Sam made a public Twitter apology afterwards and second, he didn’t injure him. Play carried on for another seven or eight phases and Sam actually tackled the same guy a further two times. At the first of those contacts he said to him while they were on the floor together, ‘Sorry about that, are you alright?’“That’s obviously not visible or audible to the judiciary panel, so those are the kind of things we can extract from Sam during the hearing to convey things the panel weren’t aware of.”We chat about the importance of players choosing their words carefully, avoiding terms that can be taken out of context. We touch on the nervousness that players often feel, like do you call the tribunal chairman ‘sir’ or ‘your honour’? We don’t get around to discussing the biscuits on offer, something made famous when Brendan Venter was rebuked for eating one with ‘a certain disdain’ in front of a 2010 panel.It’s probably just as well. Who knows where a casual remark about biscuits could end up. Attwood could talk the hind legs off a donkey and the front legs too, and that is meant as a compliment. Every topic seems to interest him – bar perhaps the 1972 Land Registry Act that he was reading about when RW rang – and he is engaging company.Attwood celebrates Bristol’s 2020 Challenge Cup triumph with Jake Woolmore and Joe Joyce (Inpho)A whole new conversation ensues on the high-tackle framework, and the proliferation of red and yellow cards, that has injected a jeopardy that didn’t exist for the sport’s first 150 years. You can be plain stupid or dead unlucky but either way there’s a lot more of this to come while players learn new behaviours in tackling. Attwood knows he may have to defend himself in a hearing one day; he already nearly did after an incident against Wasps.“I was pretty much level with the floor when I tackled the ball-carrier, I couldn’t have been much lower. But he had just survived a tackle attempt and was getting up off the floor and I tried to hit him and carry him back over the try-line. As I did so, my forearm came into contact with his head and neck area, and the TMO came in.Winning a lineout against Quins in March (Getty Images)“The referee looked at it and awarded a penalty. It will pervade my psyche with how I approach the contact area. I’ll have to be more considerate of people’s heads.”I remember seeing that incident and thinking it was a farcical decision to review it. But it’s the world we now live in. Does he think the current culture, with frequent stoppages in professional matches to watch a heavy collision multiple times in slow motion, is reassuring for children, or parents of children, thinking of playing rugby? Or are they thinking that this sport is just too violent?“You’ll get people in both camps. The majority of parents, who are paying attention to the awareness around concussion and degenerative brain conditions and its potential association with rugby, will be reassured that rugby is changing the regulatory framework to try to make the game safer. They will be reassured by the research that’s going in to look at how concussion can be managed, identified and dealt with in a more efficient way. Attwood himself is loving his rugby more than ever, and thoughts that he would call it quits at the end of his two-year deal have been shelved. After all, Afoa has signed a contract extension at 37, so who’s going to chase him down?Against Harlequins in March, Attwood caught the ball in his 22 as Marcus Smith’s kick rebounded off a post. He beat Joe Marchant, drew Will Evans, and put Luatua away in space. The move swung this way and that before Attwood reappeared and rumbled under the posts at the other end. It was glorious to see but typical of what Bristol are producing. You sense the Bears will have the support of a lot of neutrals as they pursue their first English title.Attwood gallops clear to score against Quins, a try he sparked by running the ball from his own 22 (Getty)“I might have done that as a young player. In fact, I remember doing a similar thing for England against New Zealand,” Attwood says of his audacious counter-attack. “But a career in the Premiership has taught me that pragmatism is often one of the overriding forces.“But it is something we practise at Bristol – we practise making good decisions given what’s in front of us. If there’s only one guy coming to tackle you and you can draw him and pass to someone else, you should probably do that. We practise drawing and giving, we practise using footwork in contact, and we do that every training day.“Regardless of where you are on the field, you can still make the most of a two-on-one overlap. You can still take five metres on the edge by bending the opposition. You can still beat someone in contact. That situation against Harlequins, to me it felt like the appropriate thing to do was to create space for the offload.”Max Malins takes a high ball in the win at Leicester that secured a home semi-final for Bristol (Getty)Most days at the club start with a skills school run by Sean Marsden. Static skills for injured players, dynamic skills for fit players. In the actual training sessions, all of the phase play is designed to break the line and score a try. Every single phase. It explains why a staggering 60% of Bristol’s tries come directly from first phase.“We’ve had sessions stopped by Pat where he says, ‘Why didn’t you pass the ball?’ ‘Oh, well I thought it was safer to carry the ball,’ the player will say. ‘We’re not after safe,’ Pat says, ‘We want to do the right thing.’ That’s the focus.”It might be stretching it to say Pat Lam is rugby’s Pep Guardiola but not by much. There is risk attached of course, and that was seen in that same Quins game when Andy Uren passed to Ben Earl, who juggled the ball, got stripped in contact and conceded a try to Danny Care.Bristol director of rugby Pat Lam is redefining the boundaries for his team (CameraSport/Getty Images)But the upside is moments like Harry Randall’s stunning try after 15 seconds in the European Challenge Cup final against Toulon, when instead of running into contact, Radradra sparked a short-side foray by shifting the ball to Alapati Leiua.“When you practise being a threat from everywhere, teams have to defend you from everywhere,” adds Attwood. “There is a very high expectation on the skill level. The reason it works is because people like Callum Sheedy and Piers O’Conor practise it all the time, Semi practises it all the time. You couldn’t take this game plan and play it with Dings Crusaders, they would get relegated.“When you’re on your try-line, the likelihood is the opposition will have three players in the backfield and two or three in the contact, which means you’re attacking against nine players in the frontline. So you must be able to take advantage when a team doesn’t defend properly.“That’s why we score so many tries, because teams habitually think ‘Be pragmatic, England, Saracens rugby, we won’t play the ball in our half, it’s territory based, we’ll squeeze the opposition’. And there is a time and place for that. But when the opportunity is there, when the opposition don’t respect you enough, you have to punish them.”Crime and punishment. It’s an area that Dave Attwood excels in. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Video: Presiding Bishop preaches in Hong Kong

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Rector Knoxville, TN Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME March 6, 2012 at 12:10 am I am so grateful to be born in an era where I can see videos like this. Bishop Jefferts Schori is such a good homilist. Thank you to those who make this available to the rest of us! You are in my prayers of thanksgiving! Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AliceMarie Slaven-Emond, RN says: Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Video: Presiding Bishop preaches in Hong Kong Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI center_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Comments (1) Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Posted Mar 5, 2012 Video Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC [Episcopal News Service] Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori preached Feb. 26 — the first Sunday of Lent — during a service at St. John’s Cathedral in Hong Kong. Lent offers “an opportunity to work on healing and restoring relationships of all sorts,” said the presiding bishop. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA last_img read more

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Langue De Bois / RVL architects

first_imgArchitects: RVL architects Area Area of this architecture project Photographs:  Gaelle Le Boulicot, Clément DarrasseText description provided by the architects. The site is an old orchard of a house built in the 1960s alongside a quiet street located in an old borough that has become residential, at the immediate outskirts of Tours city. The ground is encircled on three on its sides (east, north, south) by very close houses. The blocked outlook entails the obligation to comply with the 3 m separating limits. The east-west aspect of the long strip of ground is perpendicular to the street. On the west side sits a shed in its original shape. On the east side, running from the street, an access-path skirts the existing house and its back garden, then spreads on 60 m X 15.5m with on one side, to the north, a bulky middle-class, twentieth century house built out of micaceous chalk and on the other, to the south, a more recent masonry. The house will be erected on the last third of the ground Thus releasing, in front of the house, a vast planted surface made up of existing fruit trees, it will function like a buffer zone with the surrounding houses. On the back, a true external “room” is created, more private and hidden from the eyes of the neighbours. The dominant winds blow from the west, and very occasionally from the north, is comparatively strong on the upper floor because of the headland position of the site.Save this picture!© Clément DarrasseRecommended ProductsDoorsSaliceSliding Door System – Slider S20Enclosures / Double Skin FacadesAlucoilStructural Honeycomb Panels – LarcoreDoorsSolarluxBi-Folding Doors – EcolineDoorsSky-FrameInsulated Sliding Doors – Sky-Frame Arc“One more cube…!!! ”… This house is inspired by the site and echoes the existing shed sitting at the far end of the ground: A form “not structured” with rough materials more or less diverted. The basics in a word!! … No formal gesticulations. One starts from “what is ordinary”, tedious, a formless , caricatural form ending up with something slightly extraordinary … starting from what is most economical in short and long-term, (dimension 9.43m X 9.43m accepting the standards ranging from the wood framework to the foundations and floor on VS and to the wood panels of the 15 cm wide boarding); Thus the whole house was delivered in a semitrailer, composed of 8 wood panels pre assembled, as a result of this: 2 days of assembly; and most ecological (optimum compactness; Because of the choice of the openings, interior layout and heating floor, the heating bill is divided by four). Save this picture!© Clément DarrasseWith each time one hollows out the cube to create openings, one finds the interior walls echoing them, so that the light is pushed back or filtered. Each opening is made according to orientation and views… (the vertical windows of the sleeping areas overlook the garden without being overlooked, the upper south window lobs the neighbour’s house in term of sunshine… etc) We thus have an extremely simple constructive principle, in close relationship to interior space (“occupying” the structure): On the ground floor and floor, the bracing of the central post is achieved by two porous walls, genuine gills of the house, separating the space , creating the effects of folding screens, kinetics effects, the playful effects between natural and artificial light: These walls filter the moments of the day, their articulation is reinforced by the staircase and the stove (one passes “below, above, in front of, behind the walls”, accompaniment of the light with the movement , a vertical circulation for example). Save this picture!Courtesy of Jean-Charles LiddellAll speaks about movement and transgression of the limits (close connection between rough materials, the use, lights and shades, relationship to outside, sheen and “mixture” of materials…). Each material is used according to its mechanical properties. The external elements are found inside, the limits become blurred (the panels of the boarding are used inside changing from 1cm of hollow joint to 3 and 7 cm, the galvanized metal staircase echoes the outside sliding shutters, the whole reinforced by the 6 m long brick partition bay which disappears…. The interior wood blades are the downgraded blades of the external cladding (namely Douglas fir blades with sapwood). The sliding shutters in deployed steel mesh, take part in solar protection in summer, turning the landscape into pixels and the interior space cosier. (acting as protection). The upper large sliding shutter on the south side is activated only twice a year, “a job for the family”: to mark the change of the seasons: one closes it at the end of spring to open when autumn comes (maximum passive solar contribution; Even closed in summertime, it lets a thin band of light pervade the house). The shades of the shutters “dribble” on the semi-transparent glazing of the large south bay, making the glazing grainy by a visual effect. The materials is dematerialized: the staircase is a folded sheet metal carpet, the external boarding a true skin; The materials merge with each other: in the long term the cladding of untreated Douglas fir will turn silvery grey, dark, bearing a sheen aspect , imitating aluminium and galvanized steel. Save this picture!© Clément DarrasseTo summarize… on the ground floor we have a facilities area (kitchen, scullery, toilets) and on the upper floor sleeping area and bathroom. The living quarters are partitioned by the wall structure and by the different luminous surroundings: The living room is lofty, directly opening onto the “external room”. The dining room more intimate and 2.26m high, frames the view to the east, the kitchen echoes it. The hall is relatively dark, to accentuate the zenith light accompanying the staircase. The house is completely open with parts off, true alcoves: areas for a rest and reading are reduced to the bare minimum: ( tatami )they profit from reinforced soundproofing. The play room on the upper floor becomes the second quarter of more intimate life and voluntarily “not very definite”: storage units on wheels (usually inert) partition this part of the house according to its use (play room, storage, spare room, living room, TV room etc… with of course the possibility of making two “regular” bedrooms. Save this picture!© Gaelle Le BoulicotThis wide range of use is a purpose relating to the ‘emotional’, in the morning I’m looking for my own things among the toys of my little daughter (whom I do not see enough, but from whom I will every morning have an inventory of her “game sites” …) she wakes up with her toys that played without her!!! … hum…Project gallerySee allShow lessLegacy of the River Suite / Ian Douglas-Jones + Ben RousseauArticlesAD Round Up: Housing Part VIArticles Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/96751/langue-de-bois-rvl-architects Clipboard Area:  130 m² Photographs CopyHouses•Tours, France Langue De Bois / RVL architectsSave this projectSaveLangue De Bois / RVL architects Langue De Bois / RVL architects Houses Projectscenter_img ArchDaily “COPY” France “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/96751/langue-de-bois-rvl-architects Clipboard CopyAbout this officeRVL architectsOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesDabasToursRefurbishmentHouses3D ModelingFrancePublished on December 18, 2010Cite: “Langue De Bois / RVL architects” 18 Dec 2010. ArchDaily. Accessed 12 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogHandshowerhansgroheHand ShowersVinyl Walls3MVinyl Finish- DI-NOC™ Glass FinishPartitionsSkyfoldIntegrating Operable Walls in a SpaceCommunications2NIntercom – 2N® IP VersoCurtain WallsIsland Exterior FabricatorsPace Gallery Envelope SystemMetal PanelsTrimoModular Metal Wall – Qbiss OneConcreteSika3D Concrete PrintingMetal PanelsLorin IndustriesAnodized Aluminum – Gun Metal Grey with Arconic Tectur-Al™GlassDip-TechCeramic Printing for Public TransportationBeams / PillarsBlumer LehmannTimber Construction in Cambridge MosquePorcelain StonewareCeramiche KeopeCeramic Tiles – 9Cento MosaicTiles / Mosaic / GresiteRakoFloor and Wall Tiles – Serie PiazzettaMore products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?双向对话 / RVL architects是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Save this picture!© Gaelle Le Boulicot+ 20 Sharelast_img read more

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Casa Bonança / Mário Martins Atelier

first_img Year:  Mário Martins Houses Portugal “COPY” ArchDaily Lead Architect: Photographs Area:  423 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Projects Design Team:André Coutinhp, Mariana Franco, Rita Rocha, Sónia Fialho, José Furtado, Gonçalo Guimarães, So Yeon Lim, Thais Bressiani, Helder LimaStructural Engineer / Civil Engineer:Nuno Grave EngenhariaConstruction Directors:Marques Antunes EngenhariaCity:LagosCountry:PortugalMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Fernando Guerra / FG+SGRecommended ProductsWindowsJansenWindows – Janisol PrimoWoodEGGERWood-based materials in EGGER HeadquartersEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesAlucoilStructural Honeycomb Panels – LarcoreWoodTechnowoodPergola SystemsText description provided by the architects. This corner house is the result of renovating an old barn and the high ceilings have allowed the building to be divided into three floors that are quite open with empty spaces and free vertical communication.Save this picture!© Fernando Guerra / FG+SGSave this picture!DiagramSave this picture!© Fernando Guerra / FG+SGThe inside of the building was gutted, beside the corner, to make a garden patio with a raised swimming pool. The roof tiles were removed only in this part of the building, but the trussed were kept, free in the open air, like vertices of the original space and against a background of the infinite sky to catch the eye in a profound relationship of intimacy. Save this picture!© Fernando Guerra / FG+SGSave this picture!© Fernando Guerra / FG+SGThis is different from the privacy from the street because of the opacity of the thick walls of the original building, where the also original fenestrations filter this visual compromise between the house and the street.Save this picture!© Fernando Guerra / FG+SGThe outer wall remains, but the building is not attached to it, thus freeing its “skin” and so connecting the past with the future, the private with the town’s public space. A “deconstruction” is deliberate, creating voids in the form of unexpected courtyards, full of memories. ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/961447/casa-bonanca-mario-martins-atelier Clipboard Architects: Mário Martins Atelier Area Area of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/961447/casa-bonanca-mario-martins-atelier Clipboard Casa Bonança / Mário Martins AtelierSave this projectSaveCasa Bonança / Mário Martins AtelierSave this picture!© Fernando Guerra / FG+SG+ 38Curated by Susanna Moreira Share Manufacturers: Barbot, Cortizo, Fassa Bortolo, Grohe, Margres, Saint-Gobain, Sanindusa, Weber, Algarstone, Impermeabilizações, JJ Teixeira, Jdias 2020 CopyHouses•Lagos, Portugal “COPY” CopyAbout this officeMário Martins AtelierOfficeFollow#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesLagosPortugalPublished on May 12, 2021Cite: “Casa Bonança / Mário Martins Atelier” [Casa Bonança / Mário Martins Atelier] 12 May 2021. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodGRP Siding Façade SystemGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseMetal PanelsAurubisMill Finished Copper: Nordic StandardMetallicsHAVER & BOECKERArchitectural Wire Mesh – MULTI-BARRETTE 8130Enclosures / Double Skin FacadesIsland Exterior FabricatorsCurtain Wall Facade SystemsSealantsEffisusGutter Repair – TiteGutter3Aluminium CompositesSculptformAluminium Click-on BattensTiles / Mosaic / GresiteMargresPorcelain Tiles – Linea PrestigeMetallicsRHEINZINKZinc Roof Systems – Click Roll CapsTiles / Mosaic / GresiteTerrealTerracotta Cladding TileDoorsECLISSESliding Pocket Door – ECLISSE UnilateralWindowsJoskoWindows and Sliding Doors – ONE SeriesMore products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?Bonança住宅,旧谷仓改造 / Mário Martins Atelier是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Photographs:  Fernando Guerra / FG+SG Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Casa Bonança / Mário Martins Atelier Project gallerySee allShow lessManaskriti School / Chromed Design StudioSelected ProjectsCircle Birmingham / Bryden WoodSelected Projects Sharelast_img read more

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Malabo correspondent of AFP and RFI completes 100 days in city jail

first_img Reports News Organisation Reporters Without Borders reiterates its call for the release of Rodrigo Angue Nguema, the Malabo correspondent of Agence France-Presse and Radio France Internationale, who has been held in the capital’s Black Beach prison for the past 100 days. He was tried on a defamation charge on 1 September but the court has yet to issue a verdict.“Held for three months in pre-trial detention and another three weeks since his trial, Nguema still does not know his fate,” Reporters Without Borders said. “This long wait is incomprehensible. Imprisonment is a disproportionate punishment for defamation and we urge the authorities to amend the legislation that allows this.”The prosecutor’s office did not present charges against Nguema when he appeared at a public hearing in Malabo on 1 September in connection with the defamation action brought against him by the head of the national airline Ceiba, Mamadou Jaye, on 17 June. The court deferred its verdict.The only journalist in Equatorial Guinea working as a correspondent for international news organisations, Nguema was sued by Jaye over a report that he had embezzled 3.5 billion CFA francs (5 million euros) and skipped the country in April.Nguema got his information from rumours circulating online, which he thought he had confirmed by talking to local sources, above all at Malabo airport. The story turned out to be wrong and he quickly admitted his mistake.When a Reporters Without Borders delegation was received in Paris by the ambassador of Equatorial Guinea, Federico Edjo Ovono, on 18 September, the organisation said it would like to visit the country soon. RSF_en News Not even coronavirus escapes Equatorial Guinea’s extreme censorship June 15, 2020 Find out more Receive email alerts The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa to go furthercenter_img News September 25, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Malabo correspondent of AFP and RFI completes 100 days in city jail Coronavirus “information heroes” – journalism that saves lives November 27, 2020 Find out more Equatorial GuineaAfrica Follow the news on Equatorial Guinea Equatorial GuineaAfrica May 18, 2020 Find out more Help by sharing this information last_img read more

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Media freedom still flouted a week after military takeover

first_img to go further February 1, 2021 Find out more Al Jazeera journalist Mahmoud Hussein back home after four years in prison February 6, 2021 Find out more News Organisation July 9, 2013 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Media freedom still flouted a week after military takeover Follow the news on Egypt January 22, 2021 Find out more Less press freedom than ever in Egypt, 10 years after revolution Help by sharing this information center_img News Receive email alerts News A week after President Mohamed Morsi’s removal by the military, respect for freedom of information continues to worsen and increasingly resembles the situation under the authoritarian Supreme Council of the Armed Forces in 2011. Both Egyptian and foreign journalists have been the victims of violations since 4 July.Soldiers opened fire on protesters following a pro-Morsi demonstration outside Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo yesterday. According to the public health ministry, 51 people were killed in the shooting, including Ahmed Samir Assem El-Senoussi, a photographer with the newspaper Al-Horreya-Wal-Adalah (Freedom and Justice).Military barricades across roads leading to the demonstration prevented journalists from covering the events. As CNN reporter Ben Wedeman was doing a live report from Tahrir square, he was cut short by soldiers who confiscated his camera. Soldiers also confiscated equipment and material from a Rassd News team.Security forces arrested Dirk Emmerich, a German reporter for RTL television, and his crew as they were covering the demonstration and held them for seven hours. At a press conference on 8 July, the army’s spokesman urged “non-Egyptians” including journalists to stay away from demonstrations and military buildings.News media such as CNN and Al-Jazeera that describe Morsi’s removal as a “military coup” are being subjected to intimidation and censorship by the interim authorities. Several foreign journalists have reported feeling in danger as they continue to work.Al-Jazeera has been widely accused of “pro-Morsi” bias in its coverage and has, as a result, been nicknamed “Al-Jazeera Ikhwan” (Al-Jazeera Brothers).Police raided the premises of Al-Jazeera’s Egyptian offshoot, Al-Jazeera Mubasher, on 3 July and arrested members of its staff. The head of the station was finally released on 6 July on bail of 10,000 Egyptian pounds (1,100 euros).The head of the Al-Jazeera bureau in Cairo, Cheif Abdelfatah Fayed, was himself briefly arrested on 7 July on charges of disturbing public order and threatening national security. Then Al-Jazeera journalists were expelled from a news conference on 8 July by other journalists, who booed them. Censorship of the “new opposition” media that support Morsi or the Muslim Brotherhood is still in place. The pro-Muslim Brotherhood TV stations – Misr 25 (the Freedom and Justice Party channel), Al-Nas, Al-Hafiz and Al-Rahma – have still not been allowed to resume broadcasting, while the Freedom and Justice Party newspaper has repeatedly been prevented from printing.Reporters Without Borders calls on the interim authorities to immediately cease arbitrary censorship, arrests of media personnel and denial of access to information. They must respect their own road map and must quickly establish a civilian and democratic government that ensures that everyone, without political distinction, enjoys fundamental freedoms, including the right to information. Detained woman journalist pressured by interrogator, harassed by prison staff RSF_en EgyptMiddle East – North Africa EgyptMiddle East – North Africa Newslast_img read more

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Limerick murder trials open at Central Criminal Court

first_imgNewsLimerick murder trials open at Central Criminal CourtBy Staff Reporter – February 6, 2017 907 Print Murder accused Monika MatrackaTHE trial of a 38-year-old woman accused of the murder of popular long-distance runner, Michael Rejmer on New Years Eve 2015, is to open before the Central Criminal Court in Dublin this Monday.The body of the Polish native was found under pallets and tarpaulin in the back garden of the home he shared with Monika Matracka at The Pines, Briarfield in Castletroy.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up After reports that Mr Rejmer had not been seen in a number of days, extensive searches were initiated before his body was found in the garden. Ms Matracka was charged with the murder of the 38-year-old and has been held in custody since.Last year, the Director of Public Prosecutions directed that the matter be sent on indictment to the Central Criminal Court sitting at the Criminal Courts of Justice in Dublin.Meantime, the trial of a 56-year-old Latvian man charged with the murder of his flatmate has opened at the Central Criminal Court before Ms Justice Deirdre Murphy.Arnis Labunskis, with an address at Wolfe Tone Street, is charged with the murder of 39-year-old Dainius Burba at the same address on a date between 21 and 22 April, 2015.Mr Labunskis has been in custody after his Lithuanian flatmate was found dead in the early hours of morning in the apartment they shared.Gardaí were alerted to a disturbance at the home where Mr Burba was found dead.When arraigned, the 57-year-old pleaded not guilty. A jury of three women and nine men was sworn in to hear the case. Monika Matracka has been found guilty of the manslaughter of Michal Rejmer Previous articleLimerick man accused of defecating in security hatchNext articleCompetition winner Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Facebook Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Email WhatsApp Advertisement Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Linkedin TAGSCCJDublinfeaturedlimerickMichael RejmerMonika MatrackamurderPolish Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clashlast_img read more

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Quarterly Art Exhibit set

first_imgLocal News Twitter Twitter WhatsApp Arts Council of Midland logo The Arts Council of Midland, 1506 W. Illinois Ave., Midland, has scheduled “Visions from Cowboy Country: Quarterly Art Exhibit 2019” starting through the end of February. The exhibit features works by western artist, Herman Walker, whose roots run deep in West Texas. Walker spent his formative years here in ranching country. His life in Kerrville and time spent studying at Texas Tech inspired his love of painting and sculpture, particularly of the landscape, wildlife and people commonly found in this region. Admission is free and open to the public. Exhibit hours are from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and by appointment on Saturdays and Sundays. Go online more information about Walker and his work. Facebook By Digital AIM Web Support – February 24, 2021 Pinterestcenter_img TAGS  WhatsApp Previous article011718_UTPB_ASU_Women_JF_09Next articleMost Odessa American phones still down | Here’s how to contact us Digital AIM Web Support Facebook Quarterly Art Exhibit set Pinterestlast_img read more

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