Modern Wedding Cake

first_imgby Sandra MongerA cool modern twist on the traditional stacked wedding cake, this design combines pure white elegance with vibrant textural expression topped off with a funky sugar flower.%%ImageNewsTicker_23939%% You will need4,6,8 and 10 inch round cakes (3 inches deep), crumb coated and covered with white sugarpaste on same sized hard boards12 inch round white iced cake drumcake dowelscake smoother cake pop stickcircle cutters sizes 50mm, 65mm round cookie cutters sizes 11mm, 22mm, 32mmscissors About Sandra MongerSandra Monger is a multi-award-winning cake designer based in Bath. She is professionally trained in catering, advanced patisserie and sugarcraft and specialises in creating bespoke wedding, civil partnership and celebration cakes. Sandra’s work is much sought-after, due to her innovative designs as well as her attention to detail and customer care. Sandra has an enviable client list and is the recommended supplier to some of the finest venues in the south west. Sandra now teaches the very popular evening classes in cake decoration and sugarcraft at The City of Bath College.In September 2012 Sandra’s work was recognised at the prestigious Baking Industry Awards at London’s Park Lane Hilton, where she was named ’Celebration Cake Maker of the Year’.www.sandramongercakes.co.ukCake by Sandra Monger. Text by Sandra Monger & Robin Pakes Photographs by Robin Pakes Copyright 2014 Sandra Monger and Robin Pakes. All Rights Reserved. non-toxic glue stickwhite 15mm ribbonset square or rulerscribing toolcornflour dusting bagnon-stick rolling boarrolling pinartists’ paintbrushpiping bag2 icing rules or thin rulersmid and light blue flower pasteroyal icingsugar gluewhite modelling pastewhite flower pastelast_img read more

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Pigeons Playing Ping Pong Appear On Adult Swim’s ‘FishCenter’ [Watch]

first_imgBaltimore-based funk quartet Pigeons Playing Ping Pong have a lot going on at the moment. The band is gearing up for a run of shows leading up to their return to Red Rocks Amphitheatre with Twiddle and the Kitchen Dwellers on May 2nd, following their appearance at SweetWater 420 Fest in Atlanta over the weekend.On Monday, Pigeons Playing Ping Pong made their Adult Swim debut with an appearance and musical performance on FishCenter. For those who may be unfamiliar, FishCenter is Adult Swim’s daily marine-themed call-in game show, hosted by Dave Bonawits, Andrew Choe, Matt Harrigan, and Max Simonet. The show features discussion over footage of various fish swimming in a fish tank, where they’re ranked according to their points.With members of the band clad in pool floaties, goggles, and snorkels, guitarist Greg Ormont took the lead on “The Liquid” and “Somethin’ For Ya”, two tracks off of Pigeons’ 2017 Pizazz LP. Bassist Ben Carrey and drummer Alex Petropulos locked into a tight-knit pocket, allowing lead guitarist Jeremy Schon to shower the Adult Swim program with a series of explosive guitar solos. Pigeons Playing Ping Pong took some time to answers questions from the show’s hosts, as well as fans calling in from afar. The band discussed their recent SweetWater 420 Fest set, their upcoming Domefest event, and their devoted fanbase, “The Flock.” Pigeons also played a series of comical games with callers before closing out their Adult Swim debut with a well-executed performance of “Poseidon”.Watch video of Pigeons Playing Ping Pong performing “The Liquid” and “Somethin’ For Ya” on FishCenter below:Pigeons Playing Ping Pong – “The Liquid” / “Somethin’ For Ya”[Video: Chris McCartney]Fans can head here to watch the full episode of Pigeons Playing Ping Pong on Adult Swim’s FishCenter.For ticketing information and a full list of Pigeons Playing Ping Pong’s upcoming tour dates, head to the band’s website.last_img read more

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Shuffle Along Sets Final Performance Date

first_imgBrandon Victor Dixon & Audra McDonald in ‘Shuffle Along'(Photo: Julieta Cervantes) View Comments An all-star musical is about to shuffle off this mortal coil. Shuffle Along, or the Making of the Musical Sensation of 1921 and All That Followed will play its final performance on July 24. At the time of its closing, the show will have played 38 previews and 100 regular performances at the Music Box Theatre.Audra McDonald, who recently announced that she and her husband Will Swenson were expecting a child, was already scheduled to leave the show on July 24; Grammy winner Rhiannon Giddens was on deck to fill in. Savion Glover, who received a Tony nomination for his choreography, was also scheduled to appear in the show at that time.”I am overjoyed to be expecting a new addition to the family,” McDonald said in a statement, “yet completely heartbroken that our tremendously talented cast and company—my ‘Shuffle Family’—won’t be able to continue telling this incredible story. We are all so fortunate to have worked with—and learned from—the genius that is George C. Wolfe and played a part in bringing this vital and illuminating work to life.”The new show explores the backstory of the 1921 musical Shuffle Along as it follows the creative team and performers who brought it to life. In addition to McDonald, Brian Stokes Mitchell and Billy Porter, the cast includes Brandon Victor Dixon and Adrienne Warren, who were both Tony-nominated for their performances, Joshua Henry, Brooks Ashmanskas and Amber Iman.Broadway.com customers with tickets to canceled performances will be contacted with information on refunds or exchanges. Related Showscenter_img Shuffle Along Show Closed This production ended its run on July 24, 2016last_img read more

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Burlington Mayor Bob Kiss will not seek re-election

first_imgBurlington’s Progressive Mayor Bob Kiss announced this morning on a popular local radio program that he would not be seeking another term.His announcement came while a guest on the Charlie + Ernie + Lisa show on WVMT AM 620. Kiss said his decision not to run was not influenced by other candidates, but rather by a need for him personally to move on and focus on other things.Up until Wednesday morning, Kiss had remained reticent about his possible reelection bid and had many in Burlington and in his own party scratching their heads.Many progressives had become skeptical of Kiss’ viability as a mayoral candidate, casting doubt on his chances of securing another term. The embattled mayor recently won praise for his handling of the Occupy Burlington movement, especially his ability to quell unrest following one of the occupiers’ suicide, and the peaceful dismantling of its City Hall Park encampment.However, his final term will certainly be remembered most for the failure of Burlington Telecom, the municipal phone/cable/Internet service. Financial problems with BT have resulted in the city incurring $16.9 million in debt, fighting a $33 million lawsuit brought by creditors, incurring regulatory sanctions issued by the Vermont Public Service Board over BT’s Certificate of Public Good, and a downgrading of the city’s and Burlington International Airport’s credit ratings.The remaining candidates in the race are two Democrats, Tim Ashe and Miro Weinberger, and Republican City Councilor Kurt Wright.Ashe and Weinberger, who tied during a third-ballot vote for the Democratic nomination on November 13, will faceoff once again on December 11. The general election will be held March 6, 2012.It was widely considered that if Ashe were nominated, then Kiss would not seek re-election. Ashe is close to the Progressives. But Kiss had promised a decision by the end of November, and true to form, he lived up to his promise.Kiss, 64, was first elected as Mayor of Burlington in 2006 and was reelected in 2009. He moved to Burlington in 1972 and worked for the Agency of the Aging, the Vermont Health Department, SRS and the Social Welfare Department throughout the ’70s.last_img read more

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Pro Bono Awards: President’s Service and YLD Service Awards

first_imgPro Bono Awards: President’s Service and YLD Service Awards THE FLORIDA BAR PRESIDENT’S PRO BONO SERVICE AWARD April 1, 2002 Regular Newscenter_img The Florida Bar President’s Pro Bono Service Award was established in 1981. Its purpose is twofold: “to further encourage lawyers to volunteer free legal services to the poor by recognizing those who make such public service commitments, and to communicate to the public some sense of the substantial volunteer services provided by Florida lawyers to those who cannot afford legal fees.”This award recognizes individual lawyer service in each of Florida’s specific judicial circuits. It is presented annually in conjunction with the Tobias Simon Pro Bono Service Award given by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of Florida. Alex D. Littlefield, Jr. Tallahassee Second Judicial CircuitAlex D. Littlefield, Jr. graduated from the University of Florida law school in June 1950 and was also admitted to The Florida Bar that same year. He was in the general practice of law in Daytona Beach from 1950 until September 1966, involving trials, workers’ compensation, automobile negligence cases, and criminal law.In 1966, he moved to Tallahassee and became staff counsel for the old Florida Industrial Commission, which, under the Governmental Reorganization Act of 1969, became part of the Department of Labor and Employment Security. He handled workers’ compensation and unemployment security matters, developing in the latter an expertise in bankruptcy matters. He was assistant chief counsel in the Department of Labor’s Office of General Counsel.In May 1986, he retired from the state and was employed by the firm of Barton, Davis, and Fernandes in Gainesville. He practiced primarily in matters of probate and workers’ compensation.In March 1987, Littlefield retired from the practice of law and returned to Tallahassee. In November 1989, he began an association with Legal Services of North Florida, Inc., as a volunteer attorney.In October 1993, Littlefield began seeing persons over 60 years of age one day a month at the Senior Citizens Center in Tallahassee. Legal Services of North Florida provides free legal services to this group. For more than eight years, Littlefield provided extensive legal services to the elderly and to the poor in the form of preparing wills, living wills, powers of attorney, advance health care directives, and giving advice concerning nursing home and Medicaid and Medicare matters. From 1989 until September 2001, he provided 1,714 hours to this work.Since August 1994, Littlefield has been the attorney member of a Long-Term Care Ombudsman Council that oversees the care of persons residing in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities. The volunteer services of this counsel involve complaints of alleged abuses and inspection of the facilities. The Local Ombudsman Council is the Florida Long-Term Ombudsman Council that comprises 14 counties in the Panhandle.Littlefield has been married to his wife, Elva, for 55 years. They have five living children. Thomas E. Stone Madison Third Judicial CircuitTom Stone was born in Jacksonville, where he was raised and attended school until he was 16. He graduated from Palmetto Senior High School in Miami in 1965. He received a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of Florida in 1969. He served as an officer in the United States Army until 1973, including a tour of duty in South Vietnam. He then obtained his law degree from the University of Miami in 1975.Since gaining admission to the Bar he has practiced law in Madison, primarily in a solo practice. His practice includes family, criminal, probate, and real estate law. He provides legal services for child support enforcement for the Florida Department of Revenue and is a part-time public defender.Stone has served as a member and as chair of the Board of Trustees of North Florida Community College and has received that college’s Outstanding Service Medal. He was voted an Outstanding Citizen by the Greater Madison County Chamber of Commerce and has served as chairman of the March of Dimes Superwalk in Madison County.Stone has been active in bar activities serving as president of the Third Circuit Bar Association and chairman of the Third Circuit Bar Grievance Committee. He has been a member of the legal services panel of Three Rivers Legal Services for many years, providing services to a number of clients referred to him by that panel. He is also involved in a Senior Citizens’ Pro Bono Guardian Program. Robert L. Peters, Jr. Fernandina Beach Fourth Judicial CircuitRobert Peters has owned his own firm since 1999. His solo practice is limited to real property law. Peters has provided pro bono services through participation in the Nassau County Bar Association Pro Bono Project for the past five years, which entailed interviewing Legal Aid clients in the evening and accepting individual case work. Additionally, Peters was the Nassau County representative to Jacksonville Area Legal Aid and accepted individual cases from Jacksonville Area Legal Aid, primarily involving spousal abuse, dissolution, and child custody. Peters’ interest in assisting Legal Aid stems from Jacksonville Area Legal Aid’s representation of his mother in her dissolution 25 years ago.Peters joined the United States Air Force at the age of 17 serving as a communications analyst. He received a Bachelor of Science in accounting and real estate from Florida State University and was employed by Price Waterhouse in its Tampa office. He attended Florida State University College of Law and graduated cum laude in 1993. Peters accepted one of only 15 internships offered by the United States Army for service in Europe and assisted in criminal defense and international law at NATO Headquarters, SHAPE, Mons, Belgium. Peters subsequently served as a special agent for the FBI, and prior to founding his firm taught business law and real estate courses at the Florida State University College of Business.Peters and his wife have three children. His community involvement includes serving on the board of the YMCA for the past three years, serving as counsel for the Tumor Registry Association of Florida for the past five years, serving as president of the Nassau County Bar Association for two years, serving as a director for the Nassau County Association for Retarded Citizens for three years, and helping organize and serve as a director of First National Bank of Nassau County. John M. Keller Brooksville Fifth Judicial CircuitJohn M. Keller was born on July 8, 1953, in Brooklyn, New York, and raised in both Melbourne and Linton, Indiana. After graduation from high school he served in the United States Navy from January 1972 to January 1976. After leaving the service, Keller received an Associate of Arts degree from Brevard Community College in Melbourne, in 1978. He then transferred to Indiana University in Bloomington, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science in 1982. He graduated from the University of Dayton School of Law, in Ohio, in 1986.Keller passed the Florida bar exam in 1986, and was hired as an associate in Brooksville, with the Law Office of Richard Tombrink, Jr., where he was employed until 1989. From 1989 until 1999, Keller was an associate with the Law Office of Merritt & Mason, and in January 1999, he and his partner formed the firm of Merritt & Keller where they are currently practicing. Keller is also very fortunate to have the assistance of his wife of 14 years, Nanette, who is his secretary.In his early years of practice, Keller served four years on the Board of Directors of the Withlacoochee Area Legal Services, Inc., where he first learned of the importance of legal aid groups and pro bono service to persons in need. He is also fairly active in veterans affairs, and is a longtime member of the American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars posts. Being the resident attorney in his Spring Hill American Legion Post, Keller does some periodic pro bono work for the post as the need arises. He was also previously a member of the Spring Hill Kiwanis Club for 11 years. Most of his pro bono work is done in the area of family law, where he assists as requested by the coordinator of the Fifth Judicial Circuit Pro Bono Project in her Pro Se Divorce Clinics. Keller also meets clients at the courthouse approximately two hours or more per week in regard to the Hernando County Bar Association Legal Clinic; and he participates in the Hernando County Ask-A-Lawyer Program that is coordinated through the local courthouse. He is frequently appointed as a guardian ad litem (some pro bono and some fee-based) for minor children during their parents’ domestic disputes, where he attempts to do an investigation and ultimately draft a report that recommends the most appropriate placement and/or visitation for the children. James C. Runyon St. Petersburg Sixth Judicial CircuitJames C. Runyon graduated from the University of Florida in 1984 with a Bachelor of Arts in Criminology. In 1988, Run-yon received his Juris Doctor from Stetson University College of Law. During law school, he clerked in the Elder Law Clinic where he developed an appreciation for the need for pro bono attorneys.Upon admission to The Florida Bar in 1989, Runyon went to work for the law firm of Mensh and McIntosh in St. Petersburg as a contract attorney for the Department of Revenue.In 1990, Runyon opened a solo practice concentrating in all matters relating to family law. In 1995, he closed his practice and headed the family law department for the law firm of Battaglia, Ross, Dicus, and Wein. Feeling the need for independence, he re-opened his solo practice in St. Petersburg in July 2000, as a family law attorney.Runyon spends time each month at the Community Law Program where he assists pro se litigants. He also accepts pro bono clients from the Community Law Program. Runyon was awarded the 2001 David L. Stout Pro Bono Award for Pinellas County. Runyon also serves as a pro bono attorney for the Guardian ad Litem Program in Clearwater where he has handled over 100 cases, many involving complex termination of parental rights issues. Currently, he is the chair of the St. Petersburg Bar Liaison Committee between the clerk’s office and the court. He is a longtime member of the St. Petersburg Florida Canakaris Family Law Inn of Court.Runyon and his wife, Ruth, celebrated their silver wedding anniversary in March. They have two daughters, Jennifer and Rebecca, ages 20 and 11 Maurice Wagner Deltona Seventh Judicial CircuitMaurice Wagner has practiced law in Florida since the late 1940s. After receiving an honorable discharge from the United States Air Force in 1945, Wagner attended the University of Illinois and later Stetson University, where he received his A.B. in 1948 and his L.L.B. – J.D. the following year.One of Wagner’s earliest experiences as a law clerk in Miami was having the honor of actually working with Tobias Simon on a beach access case. Though they were unsuccessful in removing the barriers, the experience was one that Wagner will never forget. He attributes his work with Simon to his lifelong commitment to pro bono service. He was admitted to The Florida Bar in 1950, and settled in Volusia County, where he quickly became known as a crusader for minority clients who did not have the financial resources to pay for legal representation. Wagner learned firsthand the value of his pro bono work in the minority community. In 1950, he appeared before a Justice of the Peace, defending an African-American man in a misdemeanor case. The first time Wagner referred to his client as “Mister,” the Justice of the Peace chastised him for using the term of respect reserved, in his opinion, for Caucasians. When Wagner proceeded to address his client as “Mister” for a second time, he was cited for contempt and jailed.Rather than dampen his spirits, the experience merely fanned the flame of justice for minorities within Wagner. In the 1950s, he represented anyone who came to him for assistance whether they could afford to pay for his services or not, including the late Mary McLeod Bethune and Bethune-Cookman College. Wagner worked very closely with Bethune-Cookman faculty member Alvis Lee on Civil Rights matters. Throughout the 50s and 60s, Wagner handled all of the NAACP local chapter organization and legal documentation, and worked with the organization in their efforts to release jailed civil rights protesters. In the 1960s, Wagner became a lifetime NAACP member. Although he is semi-retired, Wagner continues to serve the local NAACP. In 2000, he was honored with the Pathfinders for Excellence Award for more than 30 years of pro bono service to the NAACP ideals, members and mission. That same year, The Florida Bar also honored Wagner for 50 years of service.In 1957, Wagner represented a client in Brevard County who had lost her husband in a jailhouse fire because no staff was on the scene when the fire broke out. The man had no way to escape the flames and smoke. As a result of his efforts, Wagner was successful in changing Florida state law in a landmark stare decisis ruling . [ Hargrove vs. Town of Cocoa Beach — 96 So. 2d 130]. His untiring work on this case earned Wagner the ALR award.In addition to his pro bono work with various clients and the NAACP, Wagner has made himself available to Central Florida Legal Services’ pro bono endeavors in whatever capacity his services are needed. He has represented CFLS clients and provided brief advice at legal advice clinics since the CFLS Pro Bono Program began in 1966. He continues to meet with clients and provide brief services at the CFLS legal advice clinics in DeLand. See related story by clicking here. N. Albert Bacharach, Jr. Gainesville Eighth Judicial CircuitN. Albert Bacharach, Jr., is a solo practitioner in Gainesville. He has a Bachelor of Arts from the Honors and Interdisciplinary Studies Department of Queens College of the City University of New York (1973) and a Juris Doctor from the University of Miami School of Law (1975). In addition to being a member of The Florida Bar, Bacharach is a member of the bars of the United States District Courts for the Northern, Middle, and Southern Districts of Florida; the United States Circuit Courts for the 7th, 9th, 11th and Federal Circuits, and the United States Court of Veterans Appeals.After graduation from law school, Bacharach worked for Florida Rural Legal Services in the Homestead and Ft. Pierce offices for three years. He then worked at Central Florida Legal Services in Palatka for three years. In 1982, Bacharach went into private practice with his late partner, the noted feminist, Judith Benninger Brown.Because of his belief in the rule of law, Bacharach has strived to make the provision of legal services to the poor a consistent and integral part of his practice. Since entering private practice, Bacharach has represented over 400 people and a number of organizations on a pro bono basis with regard to a myriad of legal issues. Representation has included: bankruptcy, child custody and support, child support enforcement, collections, creation of non-profit corporations, childrens’ SSI claims, criminal defense in state and federal court, defamation, dependency, dissolutions, education of handicapped children, employment, food stamps, foreclosures, guardianship, habeas corpus, landlord-tenant, Medicare payments, modifications, probate, real estate, replevin, spousal abuse, unemployment, and union benefits. Upon request, Bacharach has also served pro bono as both an attorney ad litem and a guardian ad litem.In one notable case, Bacharach prevented the Alachua County School Board from warehousing an autistic child. The matter settled with the child attending his neighborhood school and the resulting creation of an outstanding E.S.E. program at that school. In another case, Bacharach negotiated a settlement on behalf of deaf clients with a major hospital wherein the hospital agreed to come into compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act by providing sign language interpreters to deaf clients, as well as T.T.Y. telephones in the emergency room. Recently, Bacharach assisted a foreign national accused of domestic violence based on the testimony of his wife. Interestingly, the wife spoke little or no English and the arresting officer only spoke English.Bacharach regrets this award came after the death last summer of his beloved mother, Toba R. Bacharach, who would have appreciated his receipt of this award even more than he does. G. Charles Wohlust Winter Park Ninth Judicial CircuitG. Charles Wohlust is the owner of G. Charles Wohlust, P.L.C. His practice is almost exclusively focused on estate planning, probate administration, and probate litigation. He is certified by The Florida Bar in Wills, Trusts, and Estates.Wohlust received his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of Florida in 1966 and graduated from their law school in 1969. He continued his education and received an LL.M. in taxation from the University of Miami in 1971. He was admitted to The Florida Bar in 1969 and to the U.S. Tax Court and U.S. Claims Court in 1972.Wohlust is a Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel. He has been a member of The Florida Bar Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section Executive Council since 1978. From 1979 – 1985 he served as chair of The Florida Bar’s Probate Law Committee of which he has been a member since 1978. Wohlust has also been a member of The Florida Bar’s Trust Law Committee since 1995. He has been a member of the Orange County Bar since 1971 and was the chair of its Estate, Guardianship and Trust Committee from 1982 – 1983. Other memberships include the Central Florida Estate Planning Council, Central Florida Tax Roundtable, and the American Inns of Court. Wohlust is also a member of Orlando Regional Health Care Foundation’s Advisory Committee on Gift Giving Program and has previously served on both the Winter Park Code Enforcement Board and the Winter Park Board of Adjustment as well as the Board of Directors for Planned Parenthood of Central Florida.Wohlust has been an active pro bono attorney in the Guardian ad Litem (GAL) Program since its inception over 30 years ago. Since 1981 he has handled 35 pro bono cases through the Legal Aid Society’s pro bono program. All but three of those cases were GAL appointments. He has represented 55 children and three other clients and has donated over 1600 hours.Wohlust moved to Orlando in the mid-1950s and has returned after each stint at higher education. He has practiced law in the Central Florida area for all of his legal career. This lifetime connection has given him a strong sense of community and encouraged him to help children who are struggling in this community. Merette L. Oweis Lakeland 10th Judicial CircuitMerette L. Oweis was born in Wayne, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit, on July 10, 1969. In 1980 her family moved to Orlando. She graduated from the University of Central Florida in 1989 and received her Juris Doctor from Texas Southern University in 1994. During law school, she clerked for Judge Calvin Botley, magistrate, for the U.S. District Court, in Houston, Texas. She is admitted to both the Florida and Texas Bar. In 1996, she became associated with the firm of DiCesare, Davidson & Barker, P.A., in Lakeland, practicing in the area of employment and dependency law. Oweis has provided over 200 hours of service as a Dependency Guardian ad Litem for Polk County.Oweis is very grateful to the office of the Guardian ad Litem of Polk County for submitting her nomination. She considers it an honor and a privilege to be allowed to be involved in the lives of the children in need of Polk County. Patricia A. Redmond Miami 11th Judicial CircuitPatricia A. Redmond is a shareholder at Stearns Weaver Miller Weissler Alhadeff & Sitterson, P.A. in Miami, where she specializes in the areas of bankruptcy and insolvency law. Redmond received her Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from the University of Miami in 1975 and graduated from the University of Miami School of Law in 1979. She is a member of the Iron Arrow Honor Society, the highest honor attainable at the University of Miami. Upon graduating from law school in 1979, she was admitted to the bar of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and in 1980 to The Florida Bar. During her career, Redmond has dedicated a significant amount of time each year during her 22 year legal career representing the poor.Redmond’s commitment to helping the poor started immediately upon her admission to The Florida Bar. Because bankruptcy and poverty are so closely interrelated, Redmond found many opportunities to help people struggling with debt to obtain a fresh start and a new beginning. In the early 1980s, Redmond assisted Legal Services of Greater Miami, Inc., with pro bono representations, acted as a mentor to public interest lawyers and volunteers, and taught seminars to educate their attorneys with respect to consumer bankruptcy law. Redmond continued her pro bono efforts during the 1980s and 1990s by individually devoting not less than 300 hours a year to pro bono representations and educating lawyers in consumer bankruptcy law in exchange for their commitment to accept pro bono cases.In the mid 1990s, the Judge A. Jay Cristol, then chief judge of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Florida, had an idea which would channel the talents and energies of law students in helping poor and disadvantaged people who were waiting for a volunteer lawyer to handle their bankruptcy cases. Redmond was determined to make that idea a reality. In the fall of 2000, her dream came true with the establishment of the St. Thomas School of Law Bankruptcy Assistance Clinic. Redmond served as an adjunct professor of law with Laurel Isicoff, a shareholder in the Miami law firm of Kozyak Tropin & Throckmorton, P.A. Students began working on Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 cases, and the results were astounding — both from the perspective of the clients (who had been awaiting representation for some time) and from the reaction of students, many of whom are now strongly driven to provide pro bono services upon graduation. The clinic has made a difference in the lives of its clients, including two grandmothers who, as matriarchs of their respective families, were the sole source of food and shelter. Both saved their homes through successful Chapter 13 cases. Recently, at the closing interview, one of the happy grandmothers remarked how fortunate she was to be picked to be represented by the Bankruptcy Assistance Clinic and Redmond.Redmond continues to teach and coordinate the Bankruptcy Assistance Clinic today, where students and mentors from the Bankruptcy Bar help the poor and disadvantaged have access to the bankruptcy system. Additionally, Redmond has presented the model clinical program of St. Thomas at national conventions to facilitate the implementation of similar clinics nationwide. As a result, a clinic has been started at Roger Williams School of Law in Providence, Rhode Island.At Stearns Weaver Miller, a full-service law firm with offices in Miami, Ft. Lauderdale, and Tampa, Redmond practices in the area of commercial transactions and bankruptcy with concentration in creditors’ rights and insolvency counseling in both the United States Bankruptcy Court and out-of-court restructurings. She has extensive experience in representation of trustees, creditors’ committees, secured creditors and debtors in Chapter 11 cases.Redmond is currently an adjunct professor of bankruptcy law at the University of Miami School of Law. A former president of the Bankruptcy Bar Association for the Southern District of Florida, she presently serves on its board of directors and has served as chair of the Continuing Legal Education Committee for that organization. She also served as the 1998-99 chair of the Bankruptcy Law Section of The Federal Bar Association.Redmond is a frequent lecturer both locally and nationally on various aspects of bankruptcy, particularly issues involving Chapter 11. Since 1995 Redmond has been named as one of the Best Lawyers in America, and in 1999 she received the Dade County Bar Association Pro Bono Award. Richard Barton Ray Bradenton 12th Judicial CircuitRay was born in Memphis, Tennessee, on June 21,1961 and moved to Florida in 1966. He earned his undergraduate degree in business at Tulane University in New Orleans. In 1987, Ray graduated from Stetson University College of Law. His first position after law school was as an associate in a small practice in Englewood. After approximately three years, he moved to Bradenton where he went into practice with his stepfather, Saul Paster. Ray has been with the law firm of Paster, Ray & Cohen ever since and practices in the areas of real estate, family law, personal injury, and estate planning. He is also licensed to practice in the Middle District of Florida. Ray is a member of the Manatee County Bar Association and is the Manatee County representative to the 12th Judicial Circuit Pro Bono Committee. He currently sits on the board of directors for the Manatee County Bar Association and is the director in charge of youth-related activities, which includes the 12th Judicial Circuit Mock Trial Competition. He is legal counsel for three 501(c)(3) corporations, Bradenton Ballet Repertory, Inc., Sarasota Firefighter Benevolent Fund, Inc., and Manatee County Off-leash, Inc. He currently takes cases for Legal Aid of Manasota and Hope Family Services, as well as donating time to the pro bono clinic in Manatee County. He accepts cases in the areas of domestic violence, grandparent adoption, and obtaining insurance benefits.Ray has been involved with Legal Aid of Manasota, Inc., since its inception in 1991 and has donated hundreds of hours of service. Ray has consistently accepted pro bono cases mainly in the area of family law. It is rare for a case to be referred to him that he does not willingly accept. Often, while his other pro bono cases are still pending, Ray will call the office requesting another case. In addition to handling pro bono cases, Ray also helps to staff a Saturday morning Free Legal Advice Clinic for indigent clients.An active member of the Manatee County Bar Association, Ray was elected to the board of directors this year. He is also a member of The Florida Bar and the American Bar Association. Ray’s benevolent work extends beyond his pro bono commitment, as he is also actively involved in his community. He has been involved with the high school’s mock trial team as a coach. The Sarasota Firefighters Benevolent Fund has also recognized him for his continued support of their organization.Ray resides in Bradenton with his wife, Danita, and their daughter, Courtney. Hala A. Sandridge Tampa 13th Judicial CircuitHala Sandridge is the supervising shareholder of the Appellate Group for Fowler White Boggs Banker P.A. She specializes in commercial appeals and is Board Certified in Appellate Practice. Sandridge chairs Fowler White Boggs Banker’s Pro Bono Committee. A full service law firm, Fowler White Boggs Banker has over 170 attorneys in six Florida offices.Sandridge received her Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Florida in 1981 and graduated with honors from Florida State University College of Law in 1984. While in law school, she interned at the Florida Supreme Court for Justice Leander J. Shaw, Jr., and was a member of Law Review.During her 17 years of practice, Sandridge has represented many indigent clients in civil and appellate matters. Her civil pro bono cases have consisted of a variety of commercial, juvenile, and family law matters. In the early and mid-1990s, she donated many hours to Hillsborough County’s Teen Court program, designed to handle the needs of first-time juvenile offenders. Sandridge presided as “judge,” while local high school students prosecuted or defended these first-time juvenile offenders.Sandridge has donated well over 1,000 hours to pro bono matters. Her pro bono commitment began with her involvement in the Hillsborough County Bar Association’s Availability of Legal Services Committee in 1990. Sandridge was actively involved in that committee’s creation of the Legal Services Directory. She then went on to help develop the Courthouse Assistance Project that helped the “GAP Group,” those families and individuals whose income level may disqualify them from receiving publicly funded legal assistance but do not earn enough money to hire an attorney. In addition to encouraging Fowler White Boggs Banker to adopt the project, which they did in 1994, Sandridge personally provided hundreds of hours at the project and ensured its smooth operation in coordination with Hillsborough County, Bay Area Legal Services, and the clerk of the 13th Judicial Circuit.Last year, working with Bay Area Legal Services, Sandridge developed the idea of a law firm/corporate partnership to create and staff a family law position at the Project. Fowler White Boggs Banker teamed up with TECO Energy to “endow” a position to Bay Area Legal Services, to provide the local community with family law expertise at the project. The donation operates much like an endowed chair at a university. Jerry W. Gerde Panama City 14th Judicial CircuitJerry W. Gerde graduated from Duke University in 1965, and began practicing law in Panama City the following year. He has practiced with the law firm, now named Johnson, Harris, Gerde, & Jelks, P.A., continuously since 1966. He has been a charter board member of the Bay Area Hospice, Inc., the Junior Museum of Bay County, Inc., and the Bay County Teen Court, Inc. Regionally, he has served as president of the Panama City Jaycees, and as legal counsel to the Florida Jaycees; he also served on the Florida Audubon Society Board of Directors from 1977 to 1984 (serving as vice chair from 1983 to 1984). He served on the Board of Trustees of the Florida Supreme Court Historical Society from 1987 to 1995. He also served as chair of the Coastal Plains Regional Commission, Citizens Advisory Committee, from 1976 to 1981 (serving as chair from 1980 to 1981). He was appointed by the Governor as a delegate to the 1985 Governor’s Conference on Florida Endangered Species, and from 1988 to 1996 was chair of the Bay County Republican Executive Committee; he presently serves as Bay County’s state committeeman. He was Member of the Panama City Music Association Board of Trustees from 1977 to 2001, and served on the Board of Governors of St. Andrew Bay Yacht Club from 1989 to the present (serving as commodore in 1991). He served on The Florida Bar Board of Legal Specialization and Education from 1977 to 1989 (serving as chair in 1989).He has also served on the board of the American Spectator Educational Foundation since its inception in 1976. He has also served as a charter member of the 14th Circuit Pro Bono Committee, performing duties as the acting secretary since the inception of the Pro Bono Committee. He has assisted with the coordination of delivering pro bono services between the Legal Services of North Florida organization and the First Saturday Legal Clinic (a creation of the Bay County Bar Association), since its beginning — a clinic that meets on the first Saturday of each month, at which volunteer members of the Bay County and 14th Circuit Bars volunteer their time to handle the overflow of cases which go beyond the ability of Legal Services of North Florida to intake and process. From time to time, he hikes the Appalachian Trail, as well as the battlefields of the Civil War. Robert T. Bergin, Jr. West Palm Beach 15th Judicial CircuitRobert T. Bergin, Jr., practices law in West Palm Beach as a sole practitioner in the firm of Robert T. Bergin, Jr., P.A. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree and his Juris Doctor from the University of Florida. He has been a member of The Florida Bar since 1977 and has been a Florida Bar Board Certified Civil Trial Lawyer since 1983. Bergin primarily represents plaintiffs in personal injury and wrongful death cases with an emphasis on medical negligence cases. He is a member of The Florida Bar, American Bar Association, Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers (Eagle Patron), American Board of Trial Advocates (Palm Beach County Chapter President 1995-1997, National Board Representative 2000 to present), Palm Beach County Trial Lawyers Association (Member, Board of Directors, 1999 to present). Bergin has also served on The Florida Bar Civil Trial Law Certification Committee (Chair 1995-1996), Palm Beach County Bar Association Circuit Court Civil Practice Committee, and the 15th Judicial Circuit Grievance Committee. Bergin has been a longtime supporter of the Palm Beach County Legal Aid Society. David P. Kirwan Marathon 16th Judicial CircuitDavid P. Kirwan obtained a Bachelor or Arts in History from Florida State University in 1970 and graduated from Florida State University College of Law in 1972. Kirwan began his career as the sole assistant public defender assigned to the Middle and Upper Keys in Monroe County. Later, he served as both a county court judge and a circuit judge. Since 1987, Kirwan has been a sole practitioner in Marathon. For the past six years, he has coordinated the assignment of cases to Middle Keys lawyers on behalf of Legal Services of the Florida Keys. Kirwan, Board Certified in Real Estate Law since 1996, has acted pro bono as guardian and administrator ad litem and as counsel for indigent parties in several real property related suits. A Certified Civil Mediator, Kirwan has participated pro bono in both circuit and county court mediations.In 1991, Kirwan initiated the founding of Habitat for Humanity of the Middle Keys and was its first president. In addition to his hands-on participation in the building of three Habitat homes, and in many fundraising projects, Kirwan has represented Habitat for Humanity in the acquisition of land and other matters. Kirwan is a member of the Fisherman’s Hospital Board of Trustees and a member of the Ethics Committee of Hospice of the Florida Keys. He also is a member of the 16th Circuit Grievance Committee and is chair of the 16th Judicial Nominating Commission. Kirwan is a mentor in the Take Stock in Children program.He resides in Marathon with Mary, his wife and paralegal, who has always encouraged and joined in his community involvement. John T. David Ft. Lauderdale 17th Judicial CircuitJohn T. David was born and raised in Hollywood. David earned his Bachelor of Arts Degree in Sociology from Valparaiso University, in Valparaiso, Indiana. He obtained his Juris Doctor in 1984 from Nova Southeastern University. Since 1985, David has owned and operated the Law Offices of John T. David, P.A., in the city of Ft. Lauderdale, where he is a sole practitioner. His areas of practice encompass criminal defense, commercial litigation, and admiralty law.Throughout the years, he has been affiliated with several legal, civic, and religious organizations. He has been admitted to practice before the General and Trial Bar of the District for the Southern District Court of Florida, and the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals.In March of 1999, David began providing representation to Arnold Abbott and Love Thy Neighbor Fund, Inc. Abbott owns and operates a Homeless Feeding Program in which he provides food for the homeless people of Ft. Lauderdale. The City of Ft. Lauderdale had threatened to arrest Abbott for conducting this feeding program at the public picnic area at the South Beach area of Ft. Lauderdale Beach, citing the violation of city zoning codes and park rules. After substantial discovery, the case went to trial and the court found that the City of Ft. Lauderdale had violated Abbott’s right to practice his religious convictions to feed the homeless under the Florida Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1998. The case was then appealed by the City in which David continued representation for Abbott and Love Thy Neighbor Fund, Inc. After successfully defending the appeal in the Fourth District Court of Appeal, the matter came back for further proceedings before the trial court at which David prevailed once again. The matter is once again on appeal. Additionally, he has represented Arnold Abbott and Love Thy Neighbor Fund, Inc., in a trade name dispute brought before the federal courts in Michigan and subsequently transferred to the Southern District of Florida.Since the inception of this case, David has spent hundreds of hours representing the homeless and those who attempt to help them. On November 1, 2001, his efforts for the homeless were recognized as he was named the recipient of the 2001 Homeless Advocate of the Year award by the Broward Coalition for the Homeless. Not only does David put forth his efforts to the homeless, he also provides free, or at cost, legal services to many lower-income families on a regular basis. James J. Partlow Sanford 18th Judicial CircuitJames J. Partlow was born and raised in Sanford and graduated from Seminole High School in 1988. He earned a Bachelor of Science cum laude in Criminology and Criminal Justice at Florida State University in 1991 and earned his Juris Doctor from Mississippi College School of Law in 1994, where he was a member and advisor on the Moot Court Board and a member of The National Trial Competition Team. After graduation from law school, he joined the law firm of Stenstrom, McIntosh, Colbert, Whigham and Simmons, P.A. and was named partner in December 1999. He focuses his practice in the areas of marital family law, probate and general civil litigation.Since entering private practice, Partlow has provided pro bono representation for those less fortunate in the areas of complex child custody, child abuse and spousal abuse cases. Partlow is appointed by the court on a regular basis to represent dependent children and adults in dependency, Hal Marchman, and guardianship cases. Over the past 12 months, Partlow has volunteered over 70 hours in these areas.During Law Week 2000 and 2001, Partlow sponsored two high school students who shadowed his practice as much as possible and introduced the students to the private practice of law, the judicial system, local attorneys and local circuit judges to give back to the same program that exposed him to Stenstrom law firm in 1987. He has also given presentations to local schools about the practice of law and the need for continuing education.Partlow is a member of The Florida Bar, the Supreme Court of the United States of America, the United States District Court, Middle District of Florida, the Seminole County Bar Association, the Volusia County Bar Association, the Florida Family Law Section, the Florida Civil Trial Lawyers Section, and the Seminole County Family Law Section. He currently serves as a director and treasurer-elect for 2001 of the Seminole County Bar Association and director for the Seminole County Legal Aid Society, where he has served in this capacity for the past two years. He received the 2000 Pro Bono Attorney Award from the Seminole County Legal Aid Society. Partlow actively participates in fundraising events for the local bar association as well as the legal aid society. In addition, he provides legal services to those in need at his church, Palmetto Avenue Baptist. Partlow and his wife, Chandra, have one child, James Ross, who was born on June 5, 2001. Thomas R. Bakkedahl Ft. Pierce 19th Judicial CircuitThomas Bakkedahl grew up in Stuart, and attended Martin County High School. He went to Florida State University where he graduated magna cum laude in 1988 with a Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Political Science. A die-hard Seminole, Bakkedahl continued his education at Florida State University College of Law and obtained his Juris Doctor in 1991, graduating with high honors. Bakkedahl and his wife Laura are the proud parents of two children, Jake, 5, and Ellie, 3.Bakkedahl was admitted to The Florida Bar in 1991, and took a position as an assistant state attorney under Bruce Colton, State Attorney for the 19th Judicial Circuit. From 1991 to 1996 he prosecuted all varieties of criminal cases from DUI through first-degree murder, and to date has handled over 100 jury trials. In 1996, he was promoted to the attorney-in-charge of the state attorney’s Martin County office, and in 2000 he was once again promoted from the head of the Martin County office to the attorney-in-charge of the state attorney’s St. Lucie County office, the largest office within the 19th Judicial Circuit. While his duties now entail extensive administrative responsibilities (the supervision of 17 attorneys and a support staff of 16), he continues to prosecute major criminal cases.Bakkedahl respects the awesome responsibilities with which the people of the State of Florida have entrusted him, and it is with great pride that he seeks justice on their behalf.In 2000, Bakkedahl became the pro bono liaison for the State Attorney’s Office to the 19th Judicial Circuit’s Pro Bono Committee. In 2000, Bakkedahl was the recipient of the 19th Judicial Circuit’s Pro Bono Committee and Florida Rural Legal Services, Inc., Pro Bono Liaison of the year award for St. Lucie County. In 2001, he again received the Pro Bono Liaison award for St. Lucie County and the 19th Judicial Circuit’s Tobias Simon Nominee L.B. Vocelle Pro Bono Service Award.State Attorney Bruce Colton, recognizing the moral and ethical imperative that Florida’s lawyers provide legal services to the indigent, while at the same time having a concern that his assistants not to engage in a practice of law that is inconsistent with their legal duties and responsibilities to the State of Florida, directed Bakkedahl to formulate a plan that would address both concerns. Bakkedahl, under the guidance of Colton, developed the circuit’s first collective satisfaction plan. Bakkedahl’s collective satisfaction plan outlines four specific types of legal service that assistant state attorneys in the 19th Circuit can provide.First, assistant state attorneys (ASA) may assist the 19th Circuit’s office of Florida Rural Legal Services, Inc., in the placement and screening of pro bono cases. Bakkedahl assumed the responsibility of placing pro bono cases with local attorneys throughout St. Lucie County for the past two years. Through some arm-twisting and cajoling, Bakkedahl was able to place over 90 indigent clients with local St. Lucie County attorneys. Bakkedahl logged over 150 hours during 2001 in this endeavor alone. Second, assistant state attorneys within the circuit are encouraged to participate in Teen Court and mock trials. In the Teen Court scenario, the ASA acts as a judge while a juvenile offender is adjudicated by a jury of his peers. Mock trials afford the ASA an opportunity to act as a prosecutor or legal advisor to a student prosecutor. The ASA may also participate in mock trials conducted by local civic organizations and citizen groups. The mock trials and teen courts provide the ASAs with a dynamic teaching instrument to educate students and the public on the workings of the criminal justice system. Third, the ASAs are encouraged to engage in the legal education of various local civic, community, governmental, and educational groups. The ASAs’ speaking engagements vary from local town hall meetings to lecturing in the classroom setting. These speaking engagements are designed to educate the public on their rights and responsibilities as citizens of this state. The ASAs are also heavily involved in continuing legal education of law enforcement throughout the circuit. Law enforcement is kept abreast of recent developments in the law with a particular emphasis on the unique aspects of domestic violence investigations and prosecutions. Finally, ASAs within Bakkedahl’s office have the ability to participate in truancy court. At the request of the superintendent of the St. Lucie County School Board, an ASA with the office will make him or herself available after hours to prosecute truancy matters for the school board.Bakkedahl recognizes the unique circumstances with which public sector attorneys are confronted in fulfilling their moral and ethical obligations to the state’s indigent citizens. It is his hope that his collective satisfaction plan can serve as a model to all public sector lawyers, and thus tap a great reservoir of legal expertise in the pursuit of equal access to justice for all citizens of the State of Florida. Bakkedahl believes that pro bono service is a natural extension of a public sector lawyer’s dedication to the service of others. Celia Ellen Deifik Naples 20th Judicial CircuitCelia Ellen Deifik is a shareholder with Rochman, Deifik, Lanier & Ross, P.A. of Naples, and has been Board Certified in Real Property Law since 1990. Her current practice focuses on commercial, real estate and family law litigation as well as commercial and residential transactions. She received both her Bachelor of Science in Business Administration in Finance cum laude (1974) and her Juris Doctor (1977) from the University of Florida. While at the University of Florida she served on the Board of Directors of the Student Credit Union and was a member of the Moot Court.Upon graduating from law school, Deifik received her first exposure in representing the indigent as a sole practitioner for Lee County Legal Aid in 1978. Thereafter, Deifik went on to practice law in both Lee and Collier counties. Due to her knowledge in family law and juvenile dependency, she was frequently appointed or called upon to represent pro bono cases or to as act as a guardian or attorney ad litem. Marriage to a prosecutor gave her a unique window on the criminal, as well as the civil, side of the law. Through the years Deifik has worked on numerous pro bono matters coordinated by the Collier County Bar, Catholic Services and Florida Rural Legal Services. She is an active member of the Collier County Bar Association and received an award for creation and presentation of a legal secretary educational program in the 1980s. Deifik was one of many assisting in the set up and policy formation of the Collier County Family Legal Aid Society. She has further served the Bar as a member of the 20th Judicial Circuit Grievance Committee from 1997-1999. Deifik also presents seminar topics for Florida Gulf Coast University’s business outreach program. She has served the community as a member of the Code Enforcement Board for Collier County from 1996-1998. Deifik is an agent for Attorneys’ Title Insurance Fund and First American Title Insurance, Co. Leo G. Rydzewski Washington, D.C. Out-of-StateLeo G. Rydzewski earned his Bachelor of Arts in Economics in 1990 from Georgetown University and his Juris Doctor summa cum laude in 1996 from The Florida State University College of Law. Rydzewski is an associate in the Washington, D.C., office of Holland & Knight LLP, where he practices primarily in the areas of general commercial and intellectual property litigation.Rydzewski previously served on Holland & Knight’s Community Services Team, which has had a long-standing history of providing pro bono counsel to people, groups, and causes that otherwise could not afford legal representation. Rydzewski has litigated a wide variety of claims on behalf of the poor. His current cases include claims alleging that the State of Mississippi is providing indigent criminal defendants with the ineffective assistance of counsel, and that the State of Mississippi is providing inadequate medical care to HIV positive inmates, is unlawfully segregating these inmates based on their medical status, and is permitting select prison officials to violate the inmates’ First Amendment rights and subject them to cruel and unusual punishments, including physical violence. In Florida, Rydzewski previously represented a class of dependent and delinquent juveniles with mental health and substance abuse needs in a suit, now settled, alleging that the state unconstitutionally is failing to exercise the appropriate professional judgment in attending to their care. In Washington, D.C., where he practices, Rydzewski helped draft the recently promulgated regulations governing the licensure of youth residential facilities in the District, including youth group homes. On a national basis, Rydzewski helped prepare two amicus briefs to the Supreme Court of the United States arguing that Congress intended for the Americans With Disabilities Act to apply to state prisons and that the application of the Americans With Disabilities Act to state governments is a constitutional exercise of congressional authority. Rydzewski also serves as guardian ad litem to 12 juveniles in the Washington, D.C., child welfare system. Based on this extensive history of pro bono service, the Georgetown University alumni magazine profiled Rydzewski in an article titled “Attorney in Service” in its summer 2001 edition.THE YOUNG LAWYERS DIVISION LEGAL AID PUBLIC SERVICE AWARD The purpose of the Young Lawyers Division Legal Aid Public Service Award is to recognize the outstanding contributions by a public sector attorney to those in need of free legal services. Lawrence H. Kolin OrlandoLawrence H. Kolin was born in New York, New York, and earned his undergraduate degree from Trinity College in 1991, and his Juris Doctor from the University of Miami in 1994. While attending the University of Miami School of Law, he was executive editor of the University of Miami Entertainment & Sports Law Review, 1993-1994. Kolin authored “Caught in the Net,” a Book Note published at 10 University of Miami Entertainment & Sports Law Review 303, 1993. He was also a member of the Editorial Board, University of Miami Yearbook of International Law, 1992-1994. In 1992 and 1993, he served as a law clerk for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Orlando. Kolin practices in all areas of professional liability with an emphasis on medical malpractice, premises liability, as well as entertainment and intellectual property litigation. He has been a member of The Florida Bar since 1994 and is admitted to practice before all Florida State Courts, the United States District Court for the Northern, Middle and Southern Districts of Florida, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit and the United States Supreme Court. He is also a member of the American Bar Association, the Orange County Bar Association and the American Inns of Court. He is also a Certified Mediator. Kolin has served as a pro bono Guardian ad Litem since 1995, and has been appointed GAL to several multi-sibling families. Kolin has also been an Orange County Teen Court judge and advisor. For his efforts, he received a Special Award of the Legal Aid Society of the Orange County Bar Association at the Juvenile Justice Center on April 4, 1997.last_img read more

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5 reasons Americans are not saving money

first_imgAmericans are having trouble saving.Two recent studies carried out by independent pollsters say that more than 60% of adults have no emergency savings or less than $1,000 in their savings account. And among those who had savings prior to 2008, 57% said they’d used some or all of it in the Great Recession, according to a U.S. Federal Reserve survey of over 4,000 adults released last year. Those surveys don’t include automatic savings vehicles like a 401(k) or an IRA, but financial experts say consumers should try (if they can afford it) to make automatic payments into a savings account too.Personal savings rates as a percentage of disposable income dropped from 11% in December 2012 to 4.6% in August 2015, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, and have hovered at 5% since then. “It’s possible that the gains in net worth are going to high-income households, which could be consistent with the lack of savings for middle-income households,” says Mark Perry, a professor of finance and business economics at the University of Michigan-Flint. One way to keep your savings rates stable: Set-up automatic deposits and save part of your tax refund, says Signe-Mary McKernan, an economist at the Urban Institute, a think tank.Here are 5 reasons why so many American savings accounts are bare: continue reading » 47SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Elementary students sing, make arrangements of Christmas music for Elizabeth Church Manor residents

first_img“I just love singing,” said Madilynn Sharpe, a 4th grader. “It feels good to sing and make other people happy.” 4th and 5th grade chorus students performed four different songs for two groups of senior citizens. Three of the musical arrangements they brought included instruments such as hand chimes, rhythm sticks and sleigh bells. Teachers say the goal of the event is to integrate music and the arts to build school and community connections. And to put a smile on the faces of Elizabeth Church Manor residents. The art students also shared gifts they created with residents. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — Chenango Bridge Elementary students brought holiday cheer to residents of Elizabeth Church Manor Thursday morning.last_img

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Universities finalise panel to scrutinise USS valuations

first_imgSally Bridgeland – UUK nomineeA highly influential figure in the UK pensions industry, Bridgeland is a former CEO and CIO of the BP Pension Scheme.Currently, she holds a number of non-executive roles including trustee at both NEST and the Lloyds Bank pension schemes, and non-executive director at Royal London, Impax Asset Management, and the Local Pensions Partnership. The panel tasked with scrutinising the valuation of the UK’s largest pension scheme is complete following the nomination of three pensions experts.Universities UK (UUK) today put forward Hymans Robertson’s Ronnie Bowie, Avida International’s Sally Bridgeland, and the Pensions Policy Institute’s Chris Curry as its three representatives for the Joint Expert Panel, which will assess the various figures and methodologies used to value the liabilities and assets of the Universities Superannuation Scheme (USS).UUK, which represents universities and employers, has been in a long-running dispute with the University and College Union (UCU) about how the £60bn (€68.5bn) USS is funded. The scheme reported an official deficit of around £5bn following its 2017 actuarial valuation, but other calculations have put the shortfall as high as £12bn-£17bn. Proposals to close the defined benefit section of the hybrid scheme led to weeks of strike action from university staff. Since stepping down from the Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association last year, Segars has taken up a number of non-executive positions. Most notably, she is chair of the £41.9bn LGPS Central, one of eight asset pools formed by the UK’s local authority pension schemes. She is also a board member at the UK’s Environment Agency.Ronnie Bowie – UUK nominee Earlier this week the UCU named three professors as its nominees for the panel: Saul Jacka is professor of statistics at the University of Warwick and a Turing fellow at the Alan Turing Institute; Deborah Mabbett is professor of public policy at Birkbeck, and Catherine Donnelly is associate professor at Heriot-Watt University, where she heads up a unit focusing on pensions, investment and insurance research.Their appointments followed the announcement of Joanne Segars, former CEO of the PLSA, as chair of the group.The panelJoanne Segars – independent chaircenter_img Bowie joined consultancy group Hymans Robertson in 1980 and is now a partner at the firm. He is also chair of the £49bn Royal Bank of Scotland Pension Scheme, and is a former president of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries.Among his other non-executive roles Bowie is chair of court at the University of Dundee. Chris Curry – UUK nomineeCurry is director of the Pensions Policy Institute (PPI), an independent think tank. He was one of three industry experts called upon by the UK government to review its automatic enrolment programme last year. He has also worked as an economic adviser at the UK’s Department of Social Security (now the Department for Work and Pensions), and as a senior economist at the Association of British Insurers.Catherine Donnelly – UCU nomineeAn associate professor at Heriot-Watt University, Donnelly has worked as an adviser on pension scheme valuations and investment strategies for several consultancy firms. At Heriot-Watt she heads the Risk Insight Lab with a focus on pensions, investment and insurance research.Saul Jacka – UCU nomineeJacka is a professor of statistics at the University of Warwick and a Turing fellow at the Alan Turing Institute. Much of his research over his 30-year career has focused on how mathematical finance links with actuarial science. He is also a trustee of Warwick’s pension scheme for non-USS staff.Deborah Mabbett – UCU nomineeMabbett is a professor of public policy at Birkbeck. According to the UCU, much of her research has focused on the relationship between the state and occupational or private pension schemes. Her current research focuses on the implications of rising and flexible retirement ages for the management of pension assets.last_img read more

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San Carlos City local nabbed for drug charge

first_imgThe 37-year-old resident Jesus Carlos Ejercito was caught around 3:15 p.m. on Aug. 4, police said. The court recommended a P200,000 bail bond for his temporary liberty./PN BACOLOD City – Police arrested a drug suspect in Barangay 1, San Carlos City, Negros Occidental. Ejercito’s apprehension was staged on the strength of an arrest warrant issued by Judge Arville Delgado of the Regional Trial Court Branch 57 in San Carlos City dated June 17, 2020. The suspect was detained in the lockup facility of the San Carlos City police station.last_img

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Senator Liesing talks education

first_imgOldenburg, In. — Ensuring Indiana students have the opportunity to receive a quality education is always a top priority for me.During the 2018 legislative session, I supported several bills aimed at improving Indiana’s education system.House Enrolled Act 1001 provides the additional funding needed due to higher-than-expected enrollment in public schools for the 2017-18 and 2018-19 school year, which will give schools the per-student funding allowed by the 2017 budget. With this bill, all Indiana schools will see a per-student increase, even if their enrollment declined.House Enrolled Act 1426 adjusts Indiana’s diploma system to make sure all high-school graduates are provided with a better, more effective pathway into college or the workforce. To do this, HEA 1426 paves the way to create more ways for students to graduate, ensuring they are on an education path that benefits their future.For more information on legislation passed this session, click here.last_img read more

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