Dash raises funds for charity

first_imgEven though the course looked decorated for Halloween, the participants in Psi Chi’s “Monster Dash” 5K weren’t ghouls and goblins, although some were dressed in costumes. Psi Chi, Saint Mary’s international psychology honor society, held the Halloween-themed race Sunday, complete with decorations along the course and optional costumes. The race included more than 250 participants running and walking Saint Mary’s nature trails. Psi Chi donated all proceeds to A Rosie Place, a center for medically fragile children. “I participated because I really like to do races, especially for a good cause like A Rosie Place,” said sophomore participant Whitney Thiel. “It’s a great chance to become involved in the community. Plus, I love running, and enjoyed sharing the experience with my friends.” Senior Lauren Easton, Psi Chi president, met with other officers at the beginning of the year to decide on service events for the club. Being a cross country runner for Saint Mary’s, she suggested the idea of a 5K race. Another officer, Leanna Perez, recommended A Rosie Place as the fund raising organization. A Rosie Place assists children who require feeding tubes, wheel chairs, walkers or even oxygen, Tieal Bishop, O’Hana Heritage Foundation’s executive director, said. Children are invited to stay in the building, which is set up like a house and is hospital certified. O’Hana Heritage Foundation built this safe haven for children in 2008. “Rosie Place is the first to serve this population of medically fragile children in the state of Indiana,” Bishop said. the Registration fees and donations from Monster Dash have the potential to benefit more than 2,000 children, Bishop said. An exact dollar amount of the total donation to A Rosie Place has not been calculated because donations are still being received. Easton said she estimates a total of more than $1,000 raised for the charity. “I just wanted to extend a tremendous ‘thank you’ to everyone who helped out today — runners, walkers and also the volunteers. Everyone had a part in making this day a sensation,” Easton said after the race. “We look forward to visiting A Rosie Place and presenting them with the final donation. We couldn’t have asked for a more beautiful day and hopefully everyone enjoyed themselves out on the course.”last_img read more

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Swarbrick recounts atmosphere during accident

first_imgDirector of Athletics Jack Swarbrick entered the football practice field at about 4:47 p.m. Wednesday, and witnessed two completed passes. He said practice seemed normal, until he felt a powerful gust of wind, and saw objects that had formerly been stationary fly past him. “It was an unremarkable journey in the sense that practice was normal and plays were being conducted with no difficulty,” he said. Shortly after, Swarbrick felt the wind speed up and heard a crash. He described the minutes preceding Declan Sullivan’s death from his perspective in a press conference Thursday, where he told reporters the University is launching a full investigation into the video tower accident that caused the Notre Dame junior’s death. Swarbrick declined to answer questions about the possible effect of the day’s weather conditions on the accident until the investigation is completed. Winds reportedly reached 50 miles per hour when Sullivan, who was videotaping the football practice for the University, was on the scissor lift that collapsed. “There is a lot to learn here, and we will learn it all,” he said. “I know there’s a lot of speculation about what may or may not have happened, but that’s what the investigation is for.” Swarbrick also declined to comment on which channels of authority authorized an outdoor practice and who was responsible for clearing the videographers to tape practice from the tower. “It’s not one decision. There are multiple decisions made,” he said. “It’s not a decision to go outside. It’s a host of decisions relevant to ‘Do you go outside?’” The Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) and a contracted accident reconstruction team are investigating the accident. The Indiana Occupational Safety and Health Administration (IOSHA) also launched an investigation. The state investigates all workplace fatalities, an IOSHA official said. As Swarbrick walked through the north end of the west field of the LaBar Practice Complex, he said he saw items like towels and Gatorade containers fly by him. Officials estimate the tower fell about 4:51 p.m., he said. “I noticed the netting on the goal posts start to bend dramatically and heard a crash,” Swarbrick said. “At first, I couldn’t orient the location of the crash.” Emergency personnel responded quickly following the collapse of the tower, Swarbrick said. NDSP responded in three minutes, followed by the Notre Dame Fire Department and a city ambulance. Swarbrick and head football coach Brian Kelly told players and staff members to leave the accident scene. “Coach Kelly remained with me by Declan until the ambulance attendant had Declan up on a lift,” Swarbrick said. Before the ambulance reached the hospital, Sullivan was no longer breathing on his own, he said. Sullivan’s parents and younger brother came to campus Wednesday evening. His sister is a freshman at the University. Vice President for Student Affairs Fr. Tom Doyle spent the evening with the family. During the press conference, University President Fr. John Jenkins said Sullivan was bright, energetic and dedicated. “There is no greater sadness for a university community than the death of one of the students. There is certainly no greater sadness for a family than the loss of a son or brother,” Jenkins said. “It is with the sense of that double sadness that on behalf of the whole University, I want to express our deepest condolences.” Swarbrick said the investigation into Sullivan’s death began immediately. In response to questions about practicing in the weather conditions and allowing the videographers to use the towers, he said each individual sports program makes its own decisions about how practice will proceed. Investigators will examine the decisions made about that specific practice leading up to the accident, he said. Swarbrick said no information will be released until the investigation is complete. He said he expects the practice field will be restored by this weekend. At least one other videographer was on a tower taping practice Wednesday. Swarbrick said he has witnessed past practices in which the video towers were not used, possibly because of weather concerns, most likely, lightning, he said. The videographers are part of the broader football administration team, and they report to a video coordinator. “We’ll let the investigation thoroughly and completely run its course. And then we’ll have the ability to really understand what happened, to learn from it and to move forward from it,” Swarbrick said.last_img read more

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Observer announces new editorial board

first_imgSeven new editors will join The Observer’s Editorial Board in 2012-13 and two current editors will retain their positions, incoming Editor-in-Chief Allan Joseph announced Sunday. Juniors Chris Allen, Jillian Barwick, John Cameron, Kristen Durbin, Sarah O’Connor and Suzanna Pratt, along with sophomore Kevin Noonan, will assume their positions on the Editorial Board after Spring Break. Junior Brandon Keelean will return as Graphics Editor, while sophomore Meghan Thomassen will return as Viewpoint Editor. Allen, an Alumni Hall resident and native of East Brunswick, N.J., will serve as Sports Editor. An accounting major, Allen covered the Notre Dame hockey team on its Frozen Four run in 2011 and coordinated The Observer’s coverage of interhall football in 2010. Barwick, a communication studies major at Saint Mary’s College, hails from Wayne, N.J. and lives in LeMans Hall. Barwick will serve as Saint Mary’s Editor after a year of covering Saint Mary’s news for The Observer. Cameron and Durbin will take over as news editors. Cameron is a finance and political science major currently studying abroad in London. A resident of Keough Hall and native of Rolling Meadows, Ill., Cameron has significant experience covering student government and reporting on campus-community relations. Durbin originally hails from Prospect Heights, Ill., and lives in Walsh Hall. The American Studies and Arts and Letters preprofessional studies major has extensive experience with “ND Minute,” The Observer’s news video blog. She also covered organized-labor issues at Eddy Street Commons. O’Connor, a McGlinn Hall resident and native of Omaha, Neb., will serve as Multimedia Editor. A junior computer science major, O’Connor is also a member of The Observer’s Photography Department and has spent significant time upgrading the multimedia section of The Observer’s website. Pratt is an anthropology and peace studies major hailing from Seattle, Wash., and a resident of Pangborn Hall. Pratt has been The Observer’s lead hockey photographer and covered the campus-wide celebration following the death of Osama bin Laden. Pratt is currently studying abroad in Australia and will take over the photo department when she returns in the fall.last_img read more

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Conference examines immigration

first_imgTo begin the Church and Immigration Conference, Bishop Alvaro Ramazzini of the Diocese of Huehuetenango in Guatemala gave the keynote address Sunday night in McKenna Hall. Both University President Fr. John Jenkins and Bishop Eusebio Elizondo of the Archdiocese of Seattle introduced the speaker.In Jenkins’ remarks, he said the United States is in political gridlock when it comes to immigration reform, and while politicians are bickering, immigrants are dying.“We need to elevate the terms of the immigration debate onto a higher moral plane,” Jenkins said. “While we certainly recognize the right of a nation to regulate immigration, we must also recognize the economic realities that force people across borders to find the means to feed their families. We must also recognize the undeniable economic benefits that immigrants, both documented and undocumented, have brought to this nation.“We must recognize the history of immigration that has helped define our nation.”Elizondo, chair of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ (USCCB) Committee on Migration, said the Church’s obligation to care for immigrants began with Jesus himself.“The Church has been involved in the immigration issue since her founding, when the Lord Jesus Christ instructed all of us to welcome the stranger, and in these interfaces we see Christ himself,” Elizondo said.Elizondo said the USCCB is the largest refugee resettlement agency in the world, and has resettled more than one million refugees since 1975.“The Catholic voice continues to have impact in the public debate on immigration,” he said. “As a community, we are at the forefront of the moral arguments governing the immigration reform debate. We should be proud of our rich tradition of defending the migrant, both here in the United States and globally. This of course not only includes the bishops but all the faithful and many of you present.”Ramazzini said immigration crises throughout the world continue because people reduce immigrants to economic statistics.“The economic dimension of globalization places productivity and effectiveness as the values that orient all our human relationships,” he said. “This economic dimension promotes inequality and injustices. That is to say, the most important values of truth, justice, love and … human dignity and the rights of others are subjective to the world market. I say [it should be] the God market.”Ramazzini said a person is not just an economic factor.“The crisis of capitalism and also the crisis of socialism is to forget that God is the fundamental in the reality,” he said. “Pope Francis, in his apostolic exhortation, ‘The Joy of the Gospel,’ emphasized that the Church — and I dare to say that I believe Christianity today is in a profound crisis — is living a new idolatry of money, in that it is money that governs us.“We have created a world of inequality and this inequality is one of the causes of the migrants today.”Consumerism has created a “throw-away society” that does not value the inherent dignity of every person, Ramazzini said.“Being a Christian is to love God and our neighbor,” he said. “We know that. Because of this, we must promote a different globalization that emphasizes love for justice and a respect of human rights. … Even people who do not have documents are persons. Is it necessary to have a document in order to be a person? Can others be a hindrance in living as a human being?“If we truly live with a globalization as I mentioned, we will have the capacity to discover who is suffering, and we would then have the capacity of helping them.”Tags: Immigration Conferencelast_img read more

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ROTC graduates commissioned as officers

first_imgNotre Dame’s three Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs will celebrate the commissioning of their graduates in a special Tri-Military Commissioning Ceremony on Saturday, Captain Mark Williams, assistant professor of aerospace studies and operations flight commander of the Air Force ROTC program, said.Emily McConville | The Observer Williams said he feels his program’s nine graduating cadets are ready to take the next step in their lives within the Air Force.“I feel that our cadets are ready to go on and do great things for our nation and the United States Air Force,” he said. “They completed a tough program and have excelled while doing so. I’m extremely proud to have witnessed them grow as individuals and as leaders.”Lieutenant Colonel and professor of military science John Polhamus said graduating members of the Army ROTC program will work in various roles after Commencement.“Eight of the graduates will enter service on active duty, while five will serve in the National Guard, and two will serve in the Army Reserves,” Polhamus said. “One graduate will go directly to medical school and will eventually serve as an army doctor. “Our graduates will serve in a variety of different Army branches, including military intelligence, engineering, field artillery, infantry, aviation, ordinance, transportation corps and signal corps.”Polhamus called this year’s graduating class “exceptional.”“I’ve had the honor to watch them grow and mature as a class for the past three years,” he said. “I have no doubt that they are prepared to enter the Army and serve with distinction as true leaders of character.”Senior and former tri-military commander Tyler Thomas said he will attend nuclear power school to begin his training to serve aboard submarines.“All of the U.S. [Army] submarines are powered by nuclear reactors, so it is important officers are technically competent enough to ensure the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear reactors,” Thomas said. “During my one and half years of additional school, I will study a variety of topics including calculus, thermodynamics and physics. After school, I will be stationed aboard a submarine for at least another three and a half years.”Thomas said Notre Dame’s support of the campus Naval ROTC program was instrumental in his development.“The University has shown the utmost support of its ROTC units, which has contributed greatly to my professional development,” Thomas said. “The unit has done a great job providing opportunities for the Midshipmen to strive as leaders.”Senior Maggie Armstrong said she will serve as a personnelist in the United States Air Force.“Personnelists perform a wide range of duties, included but not limited to performing and administering personnel programs, professional development classification, assignments, promotions, separations, personnel support for contingency operations and personal affairs,” she said. “I’m excited to be moving to a new part of the country and start my life as an Air Force officer.”Armstrong said her experience in ROTC has been “top-notch.”“In ROTC, not only have I had the opportunity to come into my own and grow individually as a leader and follower, but I’ve also seen my fellow cadets grow into capable and confident leaders and students,” she said. “Without a doubt, Air Force ROTC has been one of the defining pieces of my Notre Dame experience.”Senior Chris Lillie said he will stay on campus this summer to be the recruiter for Notre Dame’s Army ROTC program.“I will be coordinating with the incoming freshmen that have either earned scholarships or have expressed interest in the program,” Lillie said. “After that, since I got the Corps of Engineering as my branch, I will be going down to Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, for Engineering Basic Officer Leaders Course for just under 20 weeks. I will learn everything there is to know about being an officer in general, and specifically how to be an engineering officer.”Lillie said his ROTC experience has been invaluable to his academic and professional experience at Notre Dame.“We have an extremely good program here, and we all feel extremely prepared to enter the Army,” Lillie said. “Not only have I learned so much here, but I also have developed great relationships with the people around me in the program.”Polhamus said he has the utmost confidence in the 2014 ROTC graduates.“They will make themselves and Notre Dame very proud as they lead America’s sons and daughters.”Tags: 2014 Commencement, Air Force, Army, Navy, ROTClast_img read more

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‘Asian Allure’ explores growth of ND Asian community

first_imgKevin Song | The Observer The Indian Association of Notre Dame performs a Bollywood dance at Thursday night’s rehearsal for this weekend’s Asian Allure shows.Ho said this year’s performances are different from past years in that there will be no skits. Instead, the event will feature stories submitted by faculty, alumni and students along with dance and fashion elements.“Each Asian club contributed a traditional dance piece,” she said. “There are more diverse individual performers who successfully auditioned for their roles in music, dance and spoken word.“There is also a fashion show that will showcase both the traditional and modern styles of Asian culture. Though it is a production showcasing Asian culture, the cast is in fact the most diverse it has ever been in terms of age, culture and talent.”Asian Allure aims to showcase Asian culture and better connect Notre Dame with the Asian community, Ho said.“Asian Allure is the only event that showcases every Asian cultural club in addition to non-affiliated acts on campus in performance,” Ho said. “Each year presents a different theme to serve the purpose of better connecting ND with the Asian community through understanding of the different cultures.”Ho said planning for Asian Allure began in July when the board began to think of ideas for the show.“The planning process began over the summer when I was selected to be the director in the end of July,” Ho said. “The Asian Allure Board was then established, and we immediately began brainstorming ideas of what the vision of Asian Allure should be this year in contrast to past productions.”Ho said auditions were held early in fall semester and rehearsals began shortly afterward.“Auditions took place in late September and selected performers were notified of their participation the same week, after which we immediately began collaboration,” she said.Ho said Asian Allure is not just put on by students for students.“Not only are students involved, but the alumni association and faculty of ND are as well,” she said. “Many visit just to watch the performance and experience the growth of the audience in numbers and diversity since their years on campus.“Though it may only seem like a mere production, Asian Allure annually reminds Notre Dame of the special presence of the Asian community of Notre Dame and how unique each individual is. It is not only a rewarding experience to those who are involved, but also to whomever come out to watch the show.”Asian Allure is held in collaboration with the Asian Pacific Alumni of Notre Dame, Chinese Culture Society, the Filipino American Student Organization, Indian Association of Notre Dame, Japan Club, Korean Student Association, Vietnamese Student Association, Tae Kwon Do Club, Project Fresh and individual student performers.Tickets will be available for $7 at the LaFortune Box Office until an hour before each show. Tickets can also be purchased for $10 at the door.Tags: Asian Allure, Asian American Association, Asian community, Jen Ho, There and Back Again The Asian American Association will hosts its annual signature performance, Asian Allure, on Friday and Saturday in the Washington Hall auditorium, junior Jen Ho, the event’s director, said.This year’s theme, “There and Back Again,” focuses on the Asian community at Notre Dame, Ho said.“This theme addresses the growth of the Asian community in Notre Dame throughout the years,” she said. “The production will carry the audience through a transition from the traditional to the new.”last_img read more

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Meckling dies after fall from JACC

first_imgBilly Meckling, a 21-year-old male senior set to graduate this weekend, died in the early morning hours Saturday after falling from the roof of the Joyce Athletic and Convocation Center (JACC), the University announced.“Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends after this terrible tragedy,” University President Fr. John Jenkins said in a press release. “It is a profound sadness for all of us, on this graduation weekend, to lose someone so young and brimming with promise.”Meckling will be remembered at Saturday’s Baccalaureate mass, Jenkins said in an email sent to the student body.At 3:45 a.m., two students requesting assistance approached a Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) officer. On the east side of the JACC, the officer found Meckling unresponsive. Despite attempts at CPR and emergency medical care, he never regained consciousness, the press release stated.According to initial investigations, the senior was part of a group of students of who gained access to the roof of the JACC, which was wet after several days of rain in the past week, the press release said.Meckling was a four-year member and two-time monogram winner for the Irish varsity fencing team.“When one thinks of the success of Notre Dame fencing, names like Gerek Meinhardt and Lee Kiefer come to mind,” head fencing coach Gia Kyaratskhelia said in a press release. “Yet equally integral to our team success are the unsung names, the walk-ons that bring the positive spirit, energy and camaraderie to our practices and competitions to push their teammates and themselves to greater heights. Billy Meckling was one of those teammates – an invaluable member of our sabre squad who left such a massive impact on all of us as a fencer and a human being.“On the strip, Billy was a talented fencer and a determined worker on a very competitive sabre squad – evidenced by his earned monograms during the 2012 and 2014 seasons. More importantly, he was a great friend to all members of our program. A true Notre Dame man, his kindness and warmth impacted each and every one of us – and make his loss all the more difficult.”last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s students awarded opportunities at Fannie Mae

first_imgThree Saint Mary’s students embarked on a trip to learn about mortgages and affordable American housing with Fannie Mae during a four-day trip to Washington, D.C.Juniors Grace Hillman, Anna Mason and Mary Wandor traveled to the nation’s capital during winter break to participate in an externship established by Saint Mary’s alumna Renee Schultz. Editor’s Note: Anna Mason is the Associate Photo Editor at The Observer.As the senior vice president of capital markets at Fannie Mae, Schultz felt like she could give back to the community that helped her reach her goals by creating an opportunity for women to gain experience in the capital markets, as stated in a College press release.“The externship takes place over the winter or spring break and is fully funded by Saint Mary’s alumna Renee Schultz ’92,” director of the Career Crossings Office Stacie Jeffirs said in an email. “Fannie Mae serves the people who house America. They are the leading source of financing for mortgage lenders, providing access to affordable mortgage financing in all markets at all times. Their financing makes sustainable homeownership and workforce rental housing a reality for millions of Americans.”What began as an opportunity to network with women leaders in the mortgage industry has evolved to include a “summer internship program with the goal of Saint Mary’s interns receiving offers for full-time positions for after graduation,” Jeffirs said.Keeping with Schultz’s goal of encouraging female representation in the capital markets industry, Wandor said students interacted with many women in leadership positions.“We met a lot of executive women, which was really important to Renee, for us to see that there are a lot of women that are higher up at the company,” Wandor said. “We got to do a lot of that. It was really cool because I got to see what various people did in the company, especially with what I’ll be doing, too.”As an economics and engineering double major, Wandor said she found the externship to be enlightening and is looking forward to her summer internship with Fannie Mae’s economics team.“It was something very different to anything I’ve ever done. I had so much information thrown at me at once, but I loved it,” she said. “The whole experience, every second was just something new and exciting.”Hillman is a business administration major who will be interning with the company’s balance management unit this summer. She said the externship was not only a great way to make connections, but also a chance to learn more about Fannie Mae.“It was a good trip just to see more of the mission of Fannie Mae, too,” Hillman said. “Their mission is to provide affordable housing to America, and I think that’s a really commendable thing to do.”Hillman said the externship was an inspiring experience that was relevant to the future in a financial institution she sees for herself.“There are a lot of good role models at Fannie Mae,” she said. “It’s staggering how many women leaders they have on their executive team and stuff. It’s something to work for.”Tags: Fannie Mae, Internships, Renee Schultz, Washington D.C.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s faculty, students travel to see Shakespeare play

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s College english and humanistic studies departments have teamed up to arrange their annual trip to a Chicago Shakespeare performance at Navy Pier.Students and faculty were able to visit Chicago on Saturday to see a matinee performance of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”The trip is open to a variety of majors and the only requirement is that the students be interested in Shakespeare.Chicago Shakespeare normally performs at Navy Pier in downtown Chicago, however, they also give performances to schools in the area and host a wide variety of educational programs. According to the company’s website, there are currently two plays being performed: “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” and “Us/Them.” The company also does a program called Abridged Shakespeare, which cuts down the traditional plays to a shorter length for families or younger school groups.Students and faculty from Saint Mary’s carpooled to Chicago to see the company perform. In past years, a bus was provided for students who wished to make the trip but this year, it was up to students and faculty to find transportation. However, the students who decided to go made it work. Senior biology major Jordan Myers has been on the trip before and said she greatly enjoyed it in the past. Myers said in an email that the decision not to rent a bus did not impact her enjoyment of the trip as a whole.“We were able to drive there with our professors, then had a quick lunch on Navy Pier,” Myers said. “We had some time on the pier, then we saw the play, which was fantastic.” Myers and other students were able to meet and take photos with the actors and actresses after the play. They also learned about what it takes to perform Shakespeare, she said.“I gained a fuller picture of what Shakespeare might have had in mind in his time,” Myers said. “And, we learned about the different ways to portray characters and the stage.” After the trip, students were able to see the city lights at night from Navy Pier and have a quick dinner before returning to Saint Mary’s.Myers said the trip would be beneficial to younger students looking to learn about Shakespeare and English in general.“Shakespeare is all about his plays,” she said. “Why study his works at all if you don’t get to see any?” Tags: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Chicago Shakespeare, Shakespearelast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s announces additional fall semester, move-in policies

first_imgIn a Monday evening email to the student body, Gloria Jenkins, interim vice president for student affairs, announced additional information regarding the fall semester.Students will begin returning to campus Aug. 3 and continue through Aug. 9, with Residential Life and Campus Ministry leaders moving in July 27. Upon arrival, students will be given a two-hour window to move belongings into their rooms and are encouraged to bring their own move-in supplies, including carts and dollies. Each student is allowed two assistants for the move-in process.For the fall semester, off-campus students will not be allowed to visit students in their residence halls, and stoves and ovens will not be available for use.The Health and Counseling Center will be open to provide routine care to students in addition to a separate COVID-19 evaluation and testing center for students who test positive or have been exposed to the virus. A new, 24/7 telehealth service will also be implemented free of charge for students’ physical and mental health needs.Saint Mary’s athletics intends to play its fall league schedule as planned. The Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex will operate under its normal hours with adjustments for capacity, sanitation and physical distancing. Fitness classes and intramural sports will follow these adjustments as well.Regarding student organizations and programs, the email said “Saint Mary’s students may continue to participate in tri-campus activities while following the health and safety guidelines for each individual campus.”First-year students will receive introduction to such organizations and programs during Belles Beginnings, the email said.Students who have any questions regarding these policies are encouraged to email the office of student affairs.Tags: covid policies, fall 2020, Gloria Jenkinslast_img read more

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