Plenty of Demand for 2014 Corn Crop

first_img SHARE Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Jun 23, 2014 Previous articleIndiana Soybean Innovations Part of Senate ShowcaseNext articleState Fair Accepting Donations for Celebration of Champions Gary Truitt Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Plenty of Demand for 2014 Corn Crop Plenty of Demand for 2014 Corn Crop  Plenty of Demand for 2014 Corn CropMike SilverThe market is focused on the expected supply of corn for 2014; but, with a large crop, there will likely be plenty of demand. The bears have been in control of the market, focusing on weather and crop conditions. But Mike Silver, with Kokomo Grain, says the demand side has been steady and strong.  In the first week of June, we had the highest level of ethanol corn usage since December of 2011. We are averaging 972,000 barrels a day, a historic new high, Silver stated, “Right now our accumulated pace has us using 5.090 billion bushels of corn to produce ethanol,  slightly above the most recent USDA projection of 5.050 billion.” He added, if we can sustain this level of production, the corn usage number will come in at what had been forecast by USDA.  Silver told HAT that livestock and export demand, while not setting records, are strong, “When you combine ethanol demand with export sales and livestock usage, we will have good demand for this large corn crop.”While heavy rains pounded parts of the Western Corn Belt last week and parts of Indiana saw flooding, the condition of the corn crop was not impacted much, according to the USDA crop update released on Monday.  The USDA estimated corn conditions at 74% of the crop rated “Good” or “Excellent”, a 2% decrease from the previous week and a 9% increase from last year. The report falls on the high side of analyst estimates, who expected somewhere between 71-74%. Twenty-one percent was considered “Fair” up 1 % from last week, while only 5% was considered “Poor” or “Very Poor.” While crops generally look good, Silver warns producers to take precautions, “There is still a lot that can happen before harvest, and producers need to be taking precautions.  Look at your position, get some offers in above the market.”  SHARElast_img read more

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Glenn Greenwald

first_img AmericasUnited States AmericasUnited States Glenn Greenwald is a former lawyer, journalist and star blogger of the US edition of the Guardian newspaper. He will always be remembered as the journalist behind the revelations by Edward Snowden. He first met the man who a few days later became the most famous whistleblower in history in a tiny Hong Kong hotel room in May 2012. Snowden handed over to the American journalist tens of thousands of classified documents that showed the extent of the surveillance practices of the British and US intelligence services. Working alone from Rio de Janeiro, Greenwald shook the world’s most powerful nation and its British allies to their foundations. US President Barack Obama and Britain’s prime minister, David Cameron, were publicly confronted with evidence of the abuses carried out by their intelligence services. They were faced with a diplomatic firestorm and an outcry from activists and campaigners for a free Internet. It was largely thanks to Greenwald’s work that the Guardian US was awarded the prestigious Pulitzer Prize for “its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency” and for sparking “a debate about the relationship between the government and the public over issues of security and privacy”. Mabel Cáceres Peru Find out more Information hero Glenn Greenwald Gotson Pierre Haïti Find out more Help by sharing this information to go furthercenter_img Laura Poitras United States Find out more See more Follow the news on United States Yoani Sánchez Cuba Find out more Angel Santiesteban-Prats Cuba Find out more Receive email alertslast_img read more

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IN THE NEWS: Local couple’s photograph makes the New York Times

first_img12PrevNextStartStop Book Nook to reopen Latest Stories The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits IN THE NEWS: Local couple’s photograph makes the New York Times Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthRemember Them? I’m Sure Their New Net Worth Will Leave You SpeechlessbradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel And, also, he has an icebreaker and/or conversation item on the refrigerator door.“Only a select few – about 18 million — got a Christmas card from the president,” Bowden said. “But what I was proudest of was the picture of me serving at the We Piddle Around Theater.”Bowden and his wife are charter members of the theater’s signature folklife play, “Come Home, It’s Suppertime.” He has appeared in every production of the play’s 16-year run. That means more to him than a picture in the “Times” or a Trump card. Published 3:00 am Saturday, January 6, 2018 Email the author You Might Like “We didn’t think any more about it until our granddaughter called to tell us that our picture was in The New York Times,” Sara Bowden said. “Then, other people started to call. They all said they recognized me. I didn’t know I was so recognizable from behind.”Had it not been that so many people recognized his wife, Bowden said they probably would not have achieved the notoriety.“Nobody recognized me so, in hind sight, if they had not recognized Sara– we would have just been two old people going in to vote,” Bowden said, laughing. The couple said being in The New York Times added a little extra joy to their Christmas. They heard from people all around the country at this special time of year. center_img It all began when the two were doing their civic duty by going to vote on Tuesday, December 12. As they were making their way into Galloway Park, Sara Bowden said she noticed a woman in a coat crouched on the ground.“As we got closer, the woman got up,” she said. “Two men were standing there and one of them asked if we would like to have our pictures in The New York Times. How could we turn that down?”The woman identified herself as a photographer with the big city newspaper and asked permission to take the Bowdens’ picture. They agreed and the photographer snapped a photo of the couple as they walked to the Galloway Park voting center. Early dominance: Bulldogs roll to an easy win over G.W. Long In a rare mid-week matinee, the Pike County Bulldogs dominated the G.W. Long Rebels 64-29 on Friday afternoon in Brundidge…. read more Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration By The Penny Hoarder By Jaine Treadwell Sponsored Content How many men, or women for that matter, could boast of having his/her photograph in the New York Times and on the front page of The Messenger and getting a Christmas card from President Donald Trump all on the same day?Lawrence Bowden of Brundidge, laughingly, said “only a select few.”Bowden continues to get phone calls and emails about the “celebrity” that he must share with his wife, Sara Dickert Bowden. Print Articlelast_img read more

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Making mergers work

first_imgMaking mergers workOn 1 Dec 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. How do you manage the human side of mergers andacquisitions? Steve Darien advises on the best ways to keep things runningsmoothlyQ “The rumours have been confirmed, my company is merging with along-time rival. The public line is that this is ‘a merger of equals’, but intruth, my company’s HR department will make the talent assessment and directthe blending of employees. My HR counterpart at the other company will bestepping down when the merger is final. I know a lot of mergers fail because ofclashing cultures. What advice do you have for me?” A You have just described one of the most difficult and tryingsituations an HR professional will face in his or her career. In my experience,the outcome of any merger is influenced more by how you handle people issuesthan by any other factor. Chief executives tend to discount the importance of human issues in mergersand acquisitions. Caught up in the excitement of deal making, the CEO may denythere are personnel problems, or think that these types of problems will takecare of themselves. But they won’t. Potential incompatibilities between organisations abound. Differences incontrol philosophies, unionisation, culture, executive strengths, pay andbenefit plans can all interfere with a blended company’s performance. You canalso expect that performance will be reduced by employee anxiety which alwaysaccompanies merger announcements. The time necessary to unite two organisations is also a problem. A mergerrequiring resolution of government regulatory issues can take 18 months or more– a long time for employees to be concerned about their jobs. If the transitionis badly managed, the value of the deal can be undermined as a result of poorupward feedback, lack of co-operation among different functions, scepticismabout leadership, and a lack of loyalty to the firm. Furthermore, discontent in management’s upper ranks can undermine efforts toretain enough key people to keep the company running as it did before. Your goal must be to minimise disruption. I would recommend working throughthis checklist: – Communicate, communicate, communicate. Utilise employee hotlines, e-mailand voicemail and publish an online newsletter to provide progress reports andkeep information about management’s activities out front – Make sure mid-level managers are briefed regularly and encouraged to shareinformation with their staff face-to-face. Resist adopting a “bunkermentality” in which news is held close to the chest and employees are leftto speculate about what’s really going on. – Use tools such as formal and informal surveys to gather information andencourage upward communication. – If you are inexperienced in managing a merger or acquisition, bring in anindependent third party to advise you. An experienced outsider can help keeprelations between the merging entities balanced and bring objectivity todecision-making. – Develop a mechanism for identifying the right people from each company anddevelop incentives for them to stay. Identify the “non-compatibles”and set up buyouts for them. And don’t forget incentives for those who will beneeded for a period after the merger – Be realistic about organisational differences. This is where your outsideconsultant can provide valuable help. That person, or a team of people, candispassionately evaluate both companies’ value systems, executive styles,company rituals and internal communication customs and illustrate how theycompare – If there are gaps or conflicts, you will know where work needs to be donefor the merger to gain acceptance by all retained employees. This knowledgewill help you, and the CEO, to project “big-picture” goals to unifythe aggregating elements. What if you do all of this and then the merger doesn’t go through? The mediais full of examples of corporations that have geared up to merge, only forthings to fall apart after months of negotiation. Yes, some of your time willhave been wasted, but the process should have provided you with usefulassessments of your own people and a clear idea of which individuals can growwith you. The first thing to do is to prepare a communication strategy to explain toyour employees why the deal collapsed. Next, deal with employees who expectedto leave but now hope they can stay. Assess their futures with your firm on acase-by-case basis. You may wish to continue the separation process with someindividuals while retaining others. Whether the merger succeeds or fails, the most important contribution youcan make is to help employees accept the fact that change is constant and theirbest hope of landing on their feet at times of change is to excel at what theydo. Their chances of success will be better if the senior HR executive capablyand decisively manages institutional change and realignment. Steve Darien is chairman and CEO of the Cabot AdvisoryGroup (www.cabotgrp.com), a US-basedcompany of veteran senior HR executives from global organisations. Cabotprincipals have direct experience conceptualising and implementing creative,practical solutions to today’s leading HR challenges. Darien is the formersenior vice-president of HR and director of management consulting services forpharmaceutical giant Merck & Co, Inc. last_img read more

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Mr. Kenneth D. “Sonny” Chatham, Jr.

first_imgMr. Kenneth D. “Sonny” Chatham, Jr., age 86, of Vevay, Indiana, entered this life on March 4, 1932, in Jefferson County, Indiana, the son of the late, Kenneth Chatham, Sr. and Edna G. (Moore) Chatham. He was raised in Jefferson County, Indiana where he attended Central High School. Sonny was inducted into the Army National Guard of Indiana on March 15, 1949 to November 5, 1957. Sonny was united in marriage to Ruth Evelyn Leach and to this union arrived a daughter, Valerie and three sons, Kenneth, Jerry and David to bless their home. He was later united in marriage to Nina K. (Peak) Scudder and to this union arrived a son, Shane to bless their home. Sonny owned and operated the Vevay Body Shop where he enjoyed auto body repair and working on cars for several years. He also was a truck driver for Grote Manufacturing in Madison, Indiana and for Baylor Trucking in Milan, Indiana, for several years. Sonny was a member of the Jefferson Post #9 of the American Legion and was a former member of the Vevay American Legion Post #185. He was also a member of the Ryker’s Ridge Baptist Church in Madison, Indiana. Sonny resided in the Vevay community since 1964. Sonny enjoyed playing card games, especially euchre and solitaire, guns, race cars and sports of all kinds. Sonny passed away at 8:34 p.m., Friday, April 27, 2018, at the King’s Daughter’s Hospital in Madison, Indiana. Sonny is survived by his daughter, Valerie Chatham of Hanover, IN; his sons, Kenneth L. “Kenny” Chatham of Vevay, IN, Jerry Chatham and his wife: Betty of Florence, IN, Shane Chatham of Vevay, IN and David Keith Chatham of Indianapolis, IN; his step-children, Gene Ray Scudder of Florence, IN, Sherry Wainscott of Vevay, IN, Randy Paul Scudder and his wife, Peggy of Vevay, IN, Harlan Dale Scudder of Vevay, IN and Monte Scudder of Vevay, IN; his grandchildren, Travis Chatham, Lilly Chatham, Kobe Chatham, Rachel Chatham, Jillian Gregory and Scotti Sullivan; his great-grandchildren, Wyatt Chatham, Natalie Sullivan and Jessica Dickey; his several step-grandchildren; his great-great-grandchild, Bentley Kiser; his several step-great-grandchildren; his sisters, Mary Shaw of Madison, IN and Kathleen Roberts and her husband: Billie of Frankfort, KY; his brother, Jon “Ted” Chatham and his wife: Lynda of Lexington, IN and his several nieces, nephews and cousins.He was preceded in death by his parents, Kenneth Chatham, Sr. and Edna G. (Moore) Chatham; his grandson, John Paul Jewell; his companions, Anna Jean Harsin Baker and Juanita Scudder.Funeral services will be conducted Friday, May 4, 2018, at 11:00 am, by Bro. Anthony Wilks at the Truth Apostolic Church, 6160 Highway 56 Vevay, Indiana 47043. Full military rites and interment will be conducted by the Honor Guard of the Vevay American Legion Post #185 and the Vevay VFW Post #5396 in the Vevay Cemetery, Vevay, Indiana.Friends may call 5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., Thursday, May 3, 2018, at the Haskell & Morrison Funeral Home, 208 Ferry Street Vevay, Indiana 47043. Memorial contributions may be made to the Bennington United Methodist Church. Cards are available at the funeral home.last_img read more

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I Feel Pretty …

first_imgBy Kathy MieleIt was early on a weekend morning when I decided to give myself a day of pampering.Going through the cabinets in my bathroom I found all the products that would make me beautiful. The first step was smoothing on a thick layer of clay on my face. Once that was done I sat back on the couch ready to read the newspaper and wait for my facemask to harden.Steven walked in and did a quick double take. “What’s that for?” he asked.“It’s a detox mask,” I answered barely moving my lips and wondering if maybe becoming a ventriloquist was in my future.“What are you detoxing from?” he asked.“Can’t talk, mask is hardening.” I picked up the newspaper again and continued my relaxing.Once the mask was done, I decided to put a deep-oil treatment in my hair and a peppermint mask on my feet.Steven walked by again. “Wow! What’s that smell?” He looked at my feet propped up on the coffee table encased in a chalk-like substance and my oily hair on top of my head wrapped in plastic wrap.“It’s the peppermint. I’m recharging my tired feet.”I’d finished with the newspaper and had moved on to a book. “After 10 minutes I can rinse this off then I’ll put on a thick layer of shea butter before I put on a pair of white cotton socks, two hours later my feet will be baby soft and completely rehydrated.”“With a smell like that I bet you’re opening up your sinuses too!” Steven held his hand over his nose as he walked past me to go to the kitchen. “I know mine are,” he mumbled.Twenty minutes later, freshly out of the shower, the deep-oil treatment was done and my hair was air drying. No heat from a blow dryer was going to mess up a 20-minute oil treatment!I sat back on the couch ready to start my manicure. With my wet hair now hanging around my newly detoxed face and my feet sliding around in my white cotton socks, (I might have gone a little too heavy with the shea butter), I began buffing my nails.Steven came by again. “Are done in the bathroom?” he asked. “I’d like to get my shower.”“I am, but be careful in the shower,” I called. “My oil treatment might have left the floor of the shower a little slippery.”When Steven came out of the shower, my nails were finished and drying. “Thanks for the warning,” he said. “It was pretty slippery in there.”“Sorry about that. I’ll scrub it out later when I’m finished.” I waved my fingers back and forth and began blowing on them. “Do you want some lunch?” I asked.“Sure, what are you making?” he asked.“I was hoping you’d make something,” I said as I waved my fingers around. “I’m still drying.”“I was going to make some eggs,” he said. “Do you want some?”“That would be perfect,” I said as I grabbed my book and settled back into the cushions of the couch wondering why I didn’t do these beauty treatment weekends more often.last_img read more

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For Towns, Time to Reorganize

first_imgBy Jay Cook |Not only does the calendar turn after the New Year, but so do the local governing bodies around the state. Incumbent and newly elected officials will be sworn into office, and the governing bodies will choose and assign professionals to help run each town for the next year. Check below to see when and where your town will be reorganizing for 2018. Meetings are open to the public.Monmouth CountyAfter staving off a challenge from two Democrats new to county politics, Freeholder Director Lillian G. Burry and her running mate Patrick Impreveduto, Holmdel’s deputy mayor, won the freeholder election with 26.4 percent and 25.6 percent of the vote, respectively. Impreveduto will be replacing the outgoing Gary Rich, who did not seek re-election. There will be one question mark going into 2018 for the freeholder board – who will replace Republican Freeholder Serena DiMaso? The former Holmdel mayor was elected to the 13th District Assembly with Amy Handlin this year. The freeholders will scan the county scene to find the next Republican to fill DiMaso’s vacancy.When: Thursday, Jan. 4 at 4 p.m.Where: Biotechnology High School, 5000 Kozloski Road, FreeholdAtlantic HighlandsDemocrats Thomas F. Hayden III and Jon Crowley will begin their first terms on the borough council after defeating Republicans Peter Doyle and Susan Tidswell in November. Democrats will now have a majority control after the swing this past election season.When: Monday, Jan. 1 at noonWhere: Atlantic Highlands Borough Hall, 100 First Ave.Colts NeckThe Colts Neck Township Committee will again stay an all-Republican governing body. Incumbent Thomas Orgo II and political newcomer Michael Viola will be sworn in to full-term appointments, and Frank Rizzuto won the one-year unexpired term on the committee.When: Saturday, Jan. 6 at 4 p.m.Where: Colts Neck Town Hall, 124 Cedar DriveFair HavenIncumbents Christopher Rodriguez, a Democrat, and Republican Susan Sorensen will be sworn in for another three-year term after the New Year. Rodriguez and Sorensen ran against each other this past election season. Sorensen’s running mate, Elizabeth Koch, was unanimously appointed to the borough council in late November after Councilman Roland Wilhelm stepped down.When: Tuesday, Jan. 2 at 7 p.m.Where: Fair Haven Borough Hall, 748 River RoadHighlandsWith councilmembers Doug Card and Rebecca Kane-Wells choosing to not seek reelection, the Highlands Borough Council will welcome newcomers Rosemary Ryan and Kenneth Braswell to the five-member governing body.When: Monday, Jan. 1 at noonWhere: Robert D. Wilson Memorial Community Center, 22 Snug Harbor Ave.HolmdelAfter taking a break from the township committee, Republican Rocco Pascucci was re-elected to Holmdel’s governing body along with incumbent Mayor Greg Buontempo. Holmdel will soon choose a new Republican resident to fill the void of outgoing Committeeman Patrick Impreveduto, who was elected to the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders in November.When: Tuesday, Jan. 2 at 6 p.m.Where: Holmdel Town Hall, 4 Crawfords Corner RoadLittle SilverAfter a busy year on the borough council considering resident outcry about a cell tower built behind borough hall, voters decided to go in a new direction with their governing body, split between two parties. Democrat Christopher Healy was the highest vote-getter, followed closed behind by Republican Michael Holzapfel.When: Thursday, Jan. 4 at 7:30 p.m.Where: Little Silver Borough Hall, 480 Prospect Ave.Middletown Mayor Gerry Scharfenberger, flanked by his wife and children, is sworn in by Sen. Joseph Kyrillos at Middletown’s Townships 2017 Reorganization meeting at Town Hall.Middletown With a legitimate challenge from a write-in candidate, Middletown’s governing body will once again stay fully Republican. Incumbents and former mayors Tony Fiore and Stephanie Murray will take their fourth and third respective oaths of office after the New Year.When: Sunday, Jan. 7 at noonWhere: Middletown Town Hall, 1 Kings HighwayMonmouth BeachConsidering Monmouth Beach’s form of government, made of a three-person board of commissioners, there will be no official reorganization this year. The governing body will appoint new professionals at the end of January. When: Tuesday, Jan. 23 at 6 p.m.Where: Monmouth Beach First Aid Squad, 26 Beach RoadOceanportOverwhelming GOP victories across the ballots in Oceanport this season will once again have the seven-member governing body leaning Republican. Incumbents Richard Gallo Jr. and Robert Proto won the two, full-term seats on the council. Republican Stephen Solan was elected to a two-year unexpired term, and fellow Republican William Deerin, who ran unopposed, was chosen for the one-year unexpired term.When: Monday, Jan. 1 at 12:30 p.m.Where: Maple Place Middle School, 2 Maple PlaceRed BankThe tide is changing in Red Bank. Longtime Democratic Committeeman Ed Zipprich and running mate and newcomer Michael Ballard were overwhelmingly elected to the borough council two months ago. That leaves Red Bank’s governing body with majority of Democrats coming into 2018.When: Monday, Jan. 1 at 3 p.m.Where: Red Bank Borough Hall, 90 Monmouth St.RumsonWith no opposition this year, Republicans Gary Casazza was reelected with his running mate, Robert Swikart. Rumson’s seven-member borough council will stay completely Republican.When: Monday, Jan. 1 at noonWhere: Rumson Borough Hall, 80 East River RoadSea BrightThere will be at least one new face on Sea Bright’s borough council in 2018. Independent candidate Jon Schwartz mounted a campaign to defeat incumbent Republican John Lamia and his running mate Pamela Ross. Charles Rooney III, a Democrat, will again return to the council for another term.When: Saturday, Jan. 6 at 10:30 a.m.Where: Cecile F. Norton Community Center, 1167 Ocean Ave.Shrewsbury BoroughWith at least 300 votes more than their counterparts, Kimbery Doran Eulner and Erik Anderson, both GOP candidates, will be sworn-in early next year. The governing body will once again have all Republicans sitting on the borough council.When: Tuesday, Jan. 2 at 6:30 p.m.Where: Shrewsbury Borough Hall, 419 Sycamore Ave.This article was first published in the Dec. 21-28, 2017 print edition of the Two River Times.Boards of EducationBy Jennifer DriscollCheck below to see when and where your town Board of Education will be reorganizing for 2018. Meetings are open to the public.Atlantic HighlandsAtlantic Highlands BOE:January 2, 2018, 7 pmHeld at Atlantic Highlands Elementary School in the media center or auditorium.Henry Hudson School District:January 3, 2018, 7 p.mHeld at Henry Hudson Regional High School in the Music Room.Colts NeckColts Neck BOE:January 4, 2017, 6 p.m.Held at the Administration Building, 70 Conover Road.Fair HavenFair Haven BOE:January 3, 2018, 7 pmHeld in the Knollwood Library-Media Center, 224 Hance Rd.Rumson-Fair Haven Regional BOE:January 2, 2018, 7 pmHeld in the school Rumson-Fair Haven High School library.HighlandsHenry Hudson School District:January 3, 2018, 7 p.mHeld at Henry Hudson Regional High School in the Music Room.Highlands BOE:January 4, 2018, 7 pmHeld at Highlands Elementary School.HolmdelHolmdel BOE:January 3, 2018, 8:00 pmHeld at the W. R. Satz School.Little SilverLittle Silver BOE:January 4, 2018, 7 p.m.Held at the Markham Place School.MiddletownMiddletown BOE:January 3, 2018, 7 pmHeld at Middletown High School North in the Media Center.Monmouth BeachMonmouth Beach BOE:January 4, 2018 at 6 p.m.Held at Monmouth Beach Elementary School.Shore Regional BOE:January 4, 2018, 7 pmHeld in the Russell T. Olivadotti Information Center.OceanportOceanport BOE:January 3, 2018, 6 pmHeld at the Maple Place School,Shore Regional BOE:January 4, 2018, 7 pmHeld in the Russell T. Olivadotti Information Center.Red BankRed Bank Borough BOE:January 2, 2018, 7pmHeld in the Red Bank Middle School Media Center.Red Bank Regional BOE:January 3, 2018, 8pmHeld in the Conference Room of the Administration Building at 101 Ridge Road, Little Silver.RumsonRumson-Fair Haven Regional BOE:January 2, 2018, 7 pm iHeld in the school Rumson-Fair Haven High School library.Rumson Borough BOE:January 3, 2018, 6:30 pmHeld at the Higgins Library of the Forrestdale School.Sea BrightOceanport BOE:January 3, 2018, 6 pmHeld at the Maple Place School,Shore Regional BOE:January 4, 2018, 7 pmHeld in the Russell T. Olivadotti Information Center.ShrewsburyRed Bank Regional BOE:January 3, 2018, 8pmHeld in the Conference Room of the Administration Building at 101 Ridge Road, Little Silver.last_img read more

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Leaf win fourth straight by doubling Rockies 6-3

first_imgBy Bruce Fuhr,The Nelson Daily SportsThe Nelson Leafs returned to their old slow-starting ways.Only this time it didn’t cost them any points in the standings.Nine different players hit the score sheet as Nelson doubled the Columbia Valley Rockies 6-3 in Kootenay International Junior Hockey League action Sunday afternoon at the NDCC Arena.The win, coupled with a 5-1 shellacking of the Kamloops Storm Saturday, is the fourth straight for the Green and White and moves the Leafs into a third-place tie with the Spokane Braves. Nelson has won six of seven games.“This feels good . . . we’re pretty confident now so we feel pretty good,” said Leaf forward Colton Schell.Schell, teaming up with newcomer Brennan Foreman, scored the Leafs final goal during a three-goal third period that iced the contest for Nelson. But it was the slow start that had the players talking.“We came out flat at the start thinking that this was going to be an easy game,” explained Schell as the Leafs met last place Rockies with only five wins on the season. “For some reason our first periods have been bad all year. Maybe it’s a lack of preparation but we need to focus better.”Patrick Martens, on the power play, and Stephen Hynes of the Rockies scored in the first period. Nelson took control of the game in the second, outscoring the Rockies 2-1 in the second on goals by Gavin Currie and Evan J Moir, scoring his first of the season.Foreman, Currie and Schell completed the scoring for Columbia Valley in the third.Marcus Beesley stopped 20 of 23 shots, including a few of the spectacular variety in the third, to register the win. Nelson out shot Columbia Valley 34-23.Saturday the Leafs knocked off one of the hottest teams in the KIJHL in the Kamloops Storm. “We came out knowing (Kamloops) is one of the top teams in the league and if we want to be one of those teams we had to beat them and we did,” said Schell of the four-goal win over the Storm.Connor McLaughlin, who has been scoring goals wherever he’s playing, netted a pair to lead the Leafs. McLaughlin, given the night off by coach Chris Shaw, helped the Trail Smoke Eaters to victory during a road trip to northern B.C. by scoring twice against Prince George. McLaughlin scored twice in the opening frame, one coming on the power play.
Martens gave Nelson a 3-0 lead before Mike McCance solved Nelson starter Darren Hogg.In the third Connor Enright and Dallon Stoddart scored to put the game away. Tanner Burns and Currie, who now leads Nelson in scoring with 33 points, added a pair of assists.LEAF BANTER: Leaf coach Chris Shaw was without assistants Jason Rushton and Sean Dooley, both in Vernon attending a coaching clinic. . . .Nelson continues to beat up on teams outside the Murdoch Division, improving to 8-2 on the season. However, it’s inside the division that the Leafs are experiencing growing pains as the Green and White are a collective 6-9 against Murdoch opponents, with four of the wins coming against Grand Forks. Nelson has yet to defeat Murdoch front running Castlegar or Beaver Valley this season. . . .Newcomers Brennan Foreman and Joel Stewart have four and two points, respectively, since joining the team Thursday in Grand Forks. . . .Nelson hosts Spokane Friday and Castlegar Saturday as the team moves back to games within the division. Saturday’s game is in the Civic Centre Arena as the Leafs help the city celebrate the arena’s 75th anniversary. [email protected]last_img read more

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Hunter Pence’s farewell to the Giants and their fans will have you dabbing at your eyes

first_imgThere’s no crying in baseball? Yeah, and Yogi Berra is a cartoon character.You’re darn tootin’ there’s crying in baseball. Exhibit A: Hunter Pence’s glorious farewell to the Giants, their fans and the greater Bay Area. Published Thursday on the The Players Tribune, it is titled “Gr8ful.”Before we begin, you need to grab a fistful of tissues, or a monogrammed handkerchief — heck, an old rally towel will do.He begins: “I definitely wish some of the great times in our lives could go on forever …last_img

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‘Keep believing in the new SA’

first_img24 October 2006There seems suddenly to be a rash of commentators predicting that the South African miracle is over. They point to what is undoubtedly going to be a bumpy succession when President Thabo Mbeki goes, citing anecdotal evidence of a worsening crime situation in recent months.My reply is that those who believed in South Africa a decade and more ago should not get cold feet now.When I became the first major investor in the new South Africa back in 1993 with the purchase of Argus Newspapers and the creation of Independent News and Media SA, I never thought it was going to be an easy ride.But I had fundamental faith in the country’s leaders, its people and their commitment to building a decent democratic system out of the ruins of apartheid. The doomsday artists predicted we would quit when the going got tough, but 13 years later we are still there, our investment has been an excellent one, and I have never regretted a moment of it.Thabo Mbeki’s successorI still regard South Africa as a modern-day miracle, thanks to the inspirational leadership of Nelson Mandela and the leadership and management skills of his successor, President Thabo Mbeki. Mbeki steps down in 2009 after 15 years as president and deputy president, and there is a great deal of debate about his successor and the direction he will take the country.The ruling ANC meets in December next year to select a new leader who, in the nature of things, would be expected to succeed to the presidency 18 months later. I have no doubt that South Africans will choose the right leader to oversee the next phase of their development when the time comes.Already a rigorous and healthy debate is taking place about the country’s future, and how to ensure that the excellent base built by the founding leaders for long-term political stability and sound macroeconomic management survives.Even without MandelaSouth Africa’s exemplary transition to democracy was called a miracle because few outside observers thought it would work. Expectations were low and, even when the pessimists were proved wrong, there was a tendency to say that South Africa was lucky because it had Nelson Mandela, implying that without him things would have been different.I love Nelson Mandela and would count myself among his greatest admirers, but he would be the first to do justice to all those others who made sacrifices for a just and democratic system. Mbeki’s government contains many highly talented and focused ministers: Trevor Manuel, for instance, has now been Finance Minister for 10 years and is regarded by his peers as one of the best in the world. He is not the only one.It is to take nothing away from Mandela’s stature as one of the towering figures of our age to say that, among South Africans, he is no anomaly. To the contrary, he is the quintessential South African. That is why it is always a mistake to sell South Africa short.The achievements of the past dozen or so years have been remarkable by any standard. As the UN Secretary General Kofi Annan has said, South Africa today, with its robust economy, stable democracy and commitment to the rule of law, points the way to the African continent and the world as a “beacon of tolerance and mutual respect”. This is not a miracle, but a testament to the calibre of the country and its leadership.Patience rewardedIt is important to remember how easy it would have been for the first post-apartheid government to throw macroeconomic sense to the wind in seeking to redress the imbalances left by apartheid.Instead, the collective wisdom of the African National Congress as it settled into office was that imbalances created over generations of white rule could not be fixed overnight and that the first order of business must be create the conditions for sustained economic growth – a tall order given the sclerotic state of the economy in 1994.Today, we are starting to see the payoff, with growth in the past year of more than 5%, a rapidly reducing budget deficit, a growing tax base, an emerging black middle class, a housing boom in areas such as Soweto and other former townships, and a steadily deepening social cohesion.Growing painsWith growth, however, comes growing pains. It has been clear over the past year that South Africa has outgrown its infrastructure and its supply of skills. Booming car sales have exacerbated traffic jams. Demand for electricity outpaces capacity. Infrastructural projects are running behind schedules, and government departments have often not been efficient enough to spend their allocated budgets. Service delivery has faltered in many areas. Immigration from the neighbouring (and poorer) African countries, plus a major drift off the land and into the cities, has swelled shanty towns despite the government’s priority on building houses.The rising economic tide has lifted many boats, but too many remain mired in poverty. Unemployment remains stubbornly at 25%, and is falling only very slowly. Poverty in the midst of conspicuous wealth incubates crime.Yet when South Africans put their minds to something, they usually succeed. Tourism, for instance, has been a great success: last year South Africa comfortably accommodated a record 7.5 million visitors, the vast majority of whom went home glad they came. Before 1994, the number was less than 1 million.The government is all too aware of its problems and is intensely focused on overcoming them. The new Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative, and associated US$60-billion (£32-billion) capital expenditure programme, is aimed at raising growth to 6% by 2010, and halving poverty and unemployment by 2014.I am a member of the President’s International Advisory Board, which includes figures from world business such as Ratan Tata, Jurgen Schremp, George Soros and Lakshmi Mittal, and to a man we are enthusiastic about what we see as a new and vibrant South Africa, which in turn has huge implications for the rest of Africa.South Africa’s HIV/Aids programme gets serious and uninformed criticism around the world, but from what I have observed the government is very serious about HIV/Aids. It is spending billions of dollars on prevention, care and antiretroviral drugs, more than any equivalent country.Leadership contestThere is no doubt that race to succeed President Mbeki has unnerved a number of observers, but the truth is that it is not so much a presidential succession battle as a leadership contest, not all that unlike in the United States or even Britain where both leaders, like Mbeki, are drawing towards the end of their periods in office.The members of the governing alliance are thrashing out their differences in public, via a free and energetic media, which is the democratic thing to do.Last week, Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi, one of the political giants of the past two decades and a man with immense influence among the Zulu population (the biggest in South Africa), eloquently outlined his support for the Constitution and the democratic process – a very important intervention at this particular time.To be sure, there is a fair amount of name-calling and challenging of democratic credentials. But who said democracy had to be polite?Ideological shift in the ANC?Are we about to witness an ideological shift in the ANC? I don’t think so. The only “ism” that reliably applies to the governing party is pragmatism – a principled pragmatism in pursuit of an ambitious agenda to redress poverty, unequal opportunity and the other legacies of the country’s history. That is unlikely to change whoever is chosen as the ANC’s presidential candidate next year.The agenda will remain the same – actually, it is in effect mandated by the Constitution – and so will the realities that constrain the options for implementing it. One of the strengths of South African society, and one of the great sources of its stability, is a political culture of consultation and consensus, time-consuming though it often is. This remains an important feature of the ANC ethos.To call South Africa an “unqualified miracle” is to assert that the people who were responsible for what was called a miracle have somehow changed or gone away. Last time I looked, South Africans were still South Africans and still very much there. And it would still be wrong to underestimate them.Sir Anthony O’Reilly is chief executive of Independent News & Media. This article was first published in the London Independent and is reproduced here with the kind permission of the author.last_img read more

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