Local man, national airwaves: Binghamton native appears on “The Price is Right”

first_imgAfter a few close calls in the dice game he played, Tio guessed correctly, and the 2016 Chenango Forks graduate heard the words from legendary TV host Drew Carey.  A fan of free shows, Tio and his girlfriend, Madi Puleo, decided to get tickets for the popular game show, “The Price is Right.” But for Tio, this was no random decision, but rather weeks of preparation. “It was me, I was all nervous, the adrenaline was pumping,” Tio said as he recalled his name being announced during the show’s open. “I was definitely stepping out of my own personality to get picked for the show.” “While they are looking for authenticity, [the producers] are looking for people who are going to fit in well,” he said. “Prepare yourself to be very energetic and outgoing.” “When you’re up on stage, everyone is looking at you, you just kind of have to make a fool of yourself to provide for the entertainment,” Tio said. But luckily for Tio, he had experience providing hundreds, sometimes thousands of people with entertainment, serving as the mascot of Villanova University during his time on-campus. (WBNG) – During a trip out to Los Angeles this past March, Binghamton native Kenoa Tio and his girlfriend were looking a fun activity to do. Tio describes himself as an introvert, quite the opposite personality of someone who generally gets selected for TV shows. “It’s something I’m not going to forget at all,” he said. “I actually did quite a bit of research. I watched a lot of old episodes,” Tio said. “I wanted to be prepared if I got on the show.” “And, give him the car!” Carey exclaimed as Tio jumped and ran to his prize. “I was able to find that extroverted-ness,” he said. “My mindset was to just pretend like I was wearing a bunch of stuff and that no one in that audience knows who I am.” But the biggest takeaway from the experience wasn’t the car itself, but learning the lesson of being comfortable with being uncomfortable. He’s expected to be able get his prize in either late July or early August. Tio said he plans on giving the car to his mother to use as a family vehicle. After binge-watching and studying 40 episodes of the show into two weeks, Tio went through the group interview process the day of the taping, and was selected by the show’s producers.last_img read more

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Racing action in Thurles.

first_imgThe Willie Mullins-trained “Sir Des Champs” finally returns to action in the feature race, the Boomerang Animal Bedding And Boomerang Horse & Country Store Chase, which is a Listed contest worth €26,000 in prize-money.But Bryan Cooper’s mount will face stiff competition from the Gordon Elliott-trained “Mala Beach”last_img

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End of the Neanderthal Myth?

first_imgA grim Neanderthal face stares out from the cover of the October 2008 National Geographic Magazine.  Coinciding with the cover story is a TV special, Neanderthal Code, about the Neanderthal genome.  Both are replete with artwork from the magazine’s army of illustrators charged with putting flesh on bones and bringing lost prehistories to life.  The magazine’s cover title emphasizes a certain word: “The Other Humans: Neanderthals Revealed.”  That word other is the center of a long-standing belief that appears to have collapsed.  Were they really distinct from modern humans?  What do we mean by “other”?    Conjectures and cave stories about Neanderthals have been legion.  The conventional wisdom for over a century (though less so recently) has been that Neanderthals were stocky, brutish and intellectually inferior beings who were supplanted by the leaner, smarter modern humans moving into their space.  Neanderthals had brawn; moderns had brain.  Who hasn’t seen artwork of fur-clad grunter-hunters chasing after mammoths in the ice age?  Though National Geographic entertained some of the latest controversies about Neanderthals, they chose a bad time to label them as “other.”  A commentary in PNAS today has essentially removed the last argument for calling them different.1  The title is right to the point: “Separating ‘us’ from ‘them’: Neanderthal and modern human behavior.”    Pat Shipman (anthropologist, Penn State) began her commentary with a tone of remorse, as if ready to confess to a kind of paleontological racism:Neanderthals have always been treated like the poor relation in the human family.  From the recognition of the first partial skeleton from Feldhofer, Germany, in 1856, Neanderthals made scientists uneasy.  Initially they were viewed as too physically apelike to fit into Homo sapiens and too brutishly primitive to have been capable of modern human behavior.  Now, new information on Neanderthal adaptations has come from Gibraltar, an island where an adult Neanderthal cranium and pieces of a Neanderthal child’s skull were found previously.  As reported in this issue of PNAS, evidence from Vanguard and Gorham’s caves indicates that Neanderthals used unexpectedly modern and complex subsistence strategies.Most anthropologists had already brought Neanderthals well within the human circle 10/25/2007).  Erik Trinkaus, for instance, believes that Neanderthals and modern humans interbred (08/02/2007).  Most accepted them as good hunters, dexterous, social, artistic and successful in just about every way – no “poor relation” to modern humans.  It has been known for a long time that their skull capacity was, on average, larger than ours.  Still, many anthropologists just couldn’t give up the notion that they were – well, maybe not stupid, but – not as sophisticated as moderns in terms of social behaviors, creativity, and living strategies.    Shipman challenged that last argument for classifying Neanderthals as “other.”  Evidence from the Gibraltar caves shows that they possessed all four complex behaviors thought characteristic of modern humans: (1) broad use of land resources, (2) sea fishing and hunting, (3) use of small scale resources, and (4) scheduling resource use by the seasons.  This revelation came with some emotion.  “That modern human subsistence behaviors would show up among archaic humans like Neanderthals, even as late as ~28,000 B.P.,” she remarked, “is startling.”  What does it mean?    Basically, it means the anthropologists have been wrong about our brethren all along.  It undermines the notion that Neanderthals were the losers in competition with more modern, more sophisticated Homo sapiens sapiens.  Notice her last question:Paleoanthropologists currently debate whether any set of attributes of material culture can distinguish between modern and archaic human behavior.  In particular, McBrearty and Brooks challenge the paradigm that there was an abrupt “human revolution” ~40,000 years ago in Europe that marked the invasion of modern humans and the onset of modern behavior (but see ref. 16 for another view).  In Gibraltar, Neanderthals and modern humans apparently shared similar or identical “modern” subsistence practices at ~28,000, yet Neanderthals were clearly outside of the range of morphological and genetic variability of modern humans.2  If behavior did not separate “us” (modern humans) from “them” (Neanderthals), what did?In addition, she asked, if Neanderthals and modern humans lived and worked side by side at Gibraltar with the same subsistence strategies, why did they go extinct?  Shipman ended by saying, “Answers to these questions are likely to be elusive.”  Her only hope was that “more research into carefully chosen, meticulously excavated, and thoughtfully analyzed sites may be one way to begin to find them.”1.  Pat Shipman, “Separating ‘us’ from ‘them’: Neanderthal and modern human behavior,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, published September 22, 2008, doi:10.1073/pnas.0807931105.2.  This claim needs to be understood in context.  For one thing, if Neanderthals were indeed capable of interbreeding with modern humans, they were fully human.  Also, the NG article quotes Ed Green commenting on the Neanderthal genome, “We know that the human and chimpanzee sequences are 98.7 percent the same,3 and Neanderthals are much closer to us than chimps, so the reality is that for most of the sequence, there’s no difference between Neanderthals and [modern] humans.”  The differences amount to half a percent – but even then, how representative are our samples of Neanderthal DNA?  How well do we know the genetic diversity among the entire Neanderthal population?  Statistical claims like these are bound to be overturned by more data.3.  It is unfortunate that NG did not challenge Green’s reiteration of the false yet often-assumed statistic that only 1.3% separates human and chimpanzee DNA (see 06/29/2007, CMI #1 and CMI #2).The answers aren’t elusive at all.  It’s only evolutionary blinders that obscure the obvious to those who refuse to see.  Creationists aren’t surprised.  They feel vindicated    The whole human evolution story is a farce.  Think about this, for starters: now that we know Neanderthals were the mental equivalents of modern humans, evolutionists would have us believe that these people lived among and hunted all the big mammals for over 100,000 years – ten times all recorded human history – and in all that time never learned to ride a horse (11/09/2007, 08/16/2008) or plant a farm or build a city.  Is that even remotely credible?  Even when “modern humans” showed up 30,000 years ago it supposedly took them 22,000 years to figure it out.  Does that match anything you know about our curious, inventive species?  In the Darwin paleofantasyland scenario (02/22/2008), some lucky mutation must have just switched on abstract language (02/21/2008), architecture and agriculture out of nowhere (02/22/2008), because archaeology shows these abilities full blown from the start.  Who can believe the evolutionary tales any longer?  Look how goofy they can get (see 05/29/2008, 05/02/2008, 10/28/2007).    The next day after Shipman’s commentary, National Geographic News tried to do damage control.  Their article repeated the same fictional plot line, this time with feeling: “Neanderthals and modern humans are distinct species that split from a common ancestor several hundred thousand years ago.”  This was followed by “Test your Neanderthal knowledge with our online quiz,” which being interpreted, means, “Let’s make sure your indoctrination level is safe before we reveal the next admission.”  This was followed by an astonishing backtrack:Why modern humans thrived and Neanderthals ultimately failed has long been a topic of scientific intrigue, and previous research had suggested that the ability to exploit marine resources was one of the defining characteristics for the success of modern humans.    But the new research may eliminate sophisticated foraging skills from the list of potential advantages unique to humans.    “I don’t think that the success of one or the other had to do with subsistence, with the way they hunted or fed,” Finlayson said.    “There may be other factors coming into this, or it may just have been a question of luck.”Emphasize that word intrigue (def: “to accomplish or force by crafty plotting or underhand machinations”).  Pay attention: this quote is a complete admission of ignorance.  “It could be this factor, it could be that factor, it could be Lady Luck”  (cf. 03/18/2008).  What kind of scientific explanation is that?  Attributing events to chance is no better than appealing to the Stuff Happens Law (see 09/15/2008 commentary).  A cartoon on EvidentCreation (2nd cartoon) illustrates the principle.  Ignorance is not science, even if you use the methods of science to explore the extent of your ignorance.  What does the word science mean?  Knowledge.  The know-nothings (02/22/2008) have no claim on science, white lab coats notwithstanding (cf. 05/06/2008).  The Darwin diviners (07/26/2008 commentary) only surpass the Babylonians in the sophistication of their ignorance.    The BBC News tried to rescue a bad situation in their report with a quote from Chris Stringer [Natural History Museum, London]: “So there still is an element of superiority,” [Where!?]  “but it is a much more finely balanced one now” [What!?]  “This is yet another difference that had been proposed between Neanderthals and moderns which now disappears.”  That’s falsification, folks!  Where is that finely-balanced superiority they just talked about?  It just disappeared, along with their credibility.  Again, no remorse, and no repentance for their entrenched fossil racism.    Live Science quoted Clive Finlayson of the Gibraltar Museum as a spoiler: “Deep down there is this idea that modern humans are cognitively superior and therefore able to outcompete Neanderthals.  I suppose we’ve thrown a bit of a spanner in the works by showing that Neanderthals were doing exactly the same thing.”  Of course, he wasn’t surprised, he said.  He’s been arguing for many years that Neanderthals “were as intelligent as modern humans with similar behaviors.”  OK, so how exactly are the Darwinians supposed to run that flag up the pole?  Big help he is.  This is the same guy who told NG the modern humans won out by chance – not by natural selection.  This abandons any grounds for making human evolution a theory based on laws of nature; it reduces to the Stuff Happens Law.    The rest of National Geographic’s too-little-too-late article resorts to the usual evolutionist misdirection tactic of handing out promissory notes for evolutionary futureware:To resolve the issue, Marean recommends a systematic comparison of Neanderthal and human seafood collection at sites with similar availability.    “Were Neanderthals [exploiting seafood] like we expect they would if they were modern?  And if they weren’t, then the question is: Why?” he said.    “We could be getting into something interesting there, for sure.”Veddyyy inteddesting, yah, foor shoor.  Do you get angry at admissions like this?  You should.  Think how much damage has been done by the Neanderthal myth.  For over a century, school children have been indoctrinated into a vision that Neanderthals were some kind of pre-modern, human-but-not-quite product of evolution that the superior moderns (like us and the Europeans) knocked out of the race.  Countless posters, artist reconstructions, museum dummies and TV specials have told and re-told this myth for decades.  National Geographic Magazine has been one of the worst repeat offenders.  Where is their shame?  Any sign of remorse?  None whatsoever.  They still portray their organization as a beacon of scientific knowledge, leading us into a glorious future of understanding our origins.    Neanderthal Man was one of the last in the famous parade of hominids leading to the ultimate product, us.  The iconic evolutionary march of progress to Thoroughly Modern Man (and Millie) has been the subject of countless cartoons.  But it’s not funny.  This has been bad science.  It has been perpetrated with an agenda to make evolutionary philosophy appear scientific.  Now, after all that propaganda, they ask, if behavior did not separate “us” from “them,” what did?  The answer is obvious.  Nothing!    Imagine the myths that could have been spun with the bones of living humans from differing parts of the world.  Put a Watusi skeleton next to an Eskimo in the Museum of Man, and just imagine the yarns you could spin.  That is basically what has happened here.  Extreme members of the same species have been put side by side, and a fictional fable has been foisted on the unsuspecting for over a century.  Long ago it was noted that you could give a shave and a suit to a Neanderthal Man, have him walk down a New York sidewalk, and nobody would notice, even without the shave.    It’s not science that led culture down this primrose path.  It was the Darwinians – those usurping materialists who have a psychological need to force every bit of evidence into a moyboy (09/16/2005) scheme of progress from particles to people via mindless, undirected, purposeless natural processes of evolution.  They are a blight on science.  Real scientists, who find cures for disease and peer into the workings of the cell, and explore space and seek to understand the laws of physics and chemistry that bring us technological advances – God bless them all – owe nothing to these pretenders.  Like parasites, the Darwinians sap the resources of their host and use it for their own advantage.  And did you notice?  These are the same people who most vehemently breathe fire against the scientists who actually have the resources to explain the origin of life and human history (the creationists).    Let this fact melt into the folds of your cerebrum: the Darwinians were wrong again for 150 years! – just like they have been wrong about the origin of life, the fossil record, and the genetic code.  What major discovery did not hit them like a complete surprise? (the DNA code, the complexity of the cell, Mendel’s laws, the Cambrian explosion, living fossils, “convergent evolution” everywhere, to name a few examples).  What prediction did they make that has not been falsified? (e.g., molecular phylogeny, ease of self-assembly of molecules into a cell, unlimited genetic variation, evolution of the horse, life on Mars, and much more – read the back issues).  Their scientific theory is all vaporware and futureware.  Their scientific method is just-so storytelling (02/22/2008).  Their list of scientific accomplishments is a list of failures and deflated hype – a growing midden of discarded ideas, piling up and stinking to high heaven.  Their scientific legacy is a ghastly record of intolerance, arrogance, destructive doctrines and crimes against humanity.  How can real scientists stand being associated with these incorrigible miscreants?  (miscreant, n., adj.: depraved, behaving badly, scoundrel, reprobate.)  What have they done for you lately, you true scientists out there?  They are destroying your good reputation.    Take Darwin and evolution and the Victorian myth of progress out of the 19th century, and what might have happened?  Creationists would have looked at the robust skeletons dug up from the field of Christian hymnwriter Joachim Neander (see 10/26/2001), and interpreted them as fully human without a blink.  Creationist historians would have fit them into Biblical history after Babel, looking into the Table of Nations for clues.  Creationist geneticists would have recognized the propensity for exaggeration of features with inbreeding of family groups.  Creationist anatomists (like Jack Cuozzo) would theorize that the skeletons represented long-lived humans, just like the Bible said existed around the time of the Flood.  Creationist geologists would have not been misled by myths about humans evolving from apes over millions of years, and so would have felt no pressure to fit these humans into a long, stretched-out timeline.  Creationist anthropologists would not have called it “startling” to find them using the same hunting and subsistence strategies as other tribes at Gibraltar.  Who would have been more correct?  Who would have felt more comfortable with the evidence?  The fate of the evolutionist is to be constantly startled by facts that don’t fit their plot line.    Stop calling our ancient dead forebears Neanderthals – they were people.  Stop the “us” vs “them” racist rhetoric; they were our brothers.  This final collapse of the evolutionary Neanderthal Myth should arouse a call for accountability.  Americans are all up in arms right now about high-profile managers of money funds who mismanaged affairs terribly, causing major economic catastrophes, yet profited by their misdeeds to the tune of tens of millions of dollars in salaries and pensions.  The evolutionists should pay for what they have done.  It’s time to defrock them of their white lab coats, charge them with impersonating a scientist (09/30/2007) and send them packing.  Don’t let them say that science is marching on and correcting itself.  This was a painful, totally unnecessary, 150-year detour.  Don’t let them say more research will figure it out.  They cannot be trusted any more.  Don’t let them say this is just how science works.  Science is supposed to be a search for the truth.  Don’t let them say this was just an academic correction.  It seduced the minds of millions of school children.  It destroyed people’s faith.  It was all lies, lies, lies!  Citizens who love science should get really angry right about now.    Channel that righteous anger into constructive action – like cleaning house at the Science Academy.  One effective method is to cut off the flow of money for evolutionary research and other oxymorons.(Visited 122 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Web Design and Feedback Tool Notable Gets a Face-Lift

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… audrey watters The web design feedback tool Notable has taken a dose of its own medicine, if you will, monitoring its customers’ usage and feedback in order to roll out today what is a major redesign of this great app. Notable is a browser-based tool that lets you easily annotate and share feedback on website design and content. We covered Notable when the app launched a few years ago, and raved about its simplicity. As Frederic Lardinois wrote at the time, “The service works without any hiccups, is easy to use, and clearly focused on giving a specific set of users the right tools to get the job done without being encumbered by lots of extra bells and whistles.” Even so, the app is now more streamlined, with many of its feedback features easier to use.One of the best additions may be that there are now new ways to capture the websites you’d like to annotate. The original version of Notable worked (best) in Firefox, but there are now browser plugins for all major browsers – Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and IE – as well as tools to capture information from the iPhone, iPad, Mac Desktop and Windows Desktop screens. You can also export directly from Photoshop.Capturing what a website looks like is really just the first step in the process of getting feedback and revising it. The redesigned Notable has made it easier to share posts, either with a team, with specific individuals, or even with those outside your team. The app also helps clarify why people are being asked to comment, what sorts of information you’d like, and how they should act on it. Tags:#biz#tips 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market The app has also altered its user and storage limits. With the free account, you can have 10 active pages captured for annotation; the paid plans give you an unlimited number of pages to capture and mark up, as well as several additional features including PDF exports. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

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The Art of the Freeze Frame

first_imgLearn how to use the simple effect of the freeze frame to hold your image on screen and in the minds of your viewer.Top Image: The Wolf of Wall Street via Paramount PicturesWhat Is a Freeze Frame?A freeze frame halts the perceived movement in your image, effectively converting it to a still shot reminiscent of a photograph. Freeze frames are self-reflexive, so they call attention to the filmmaking process and to the filmmaker, but they are invaluable in adding emphasis, covering up for lack of footage, or creating a note of ambiguity.Thelma and Louise via MGMIn the days of shooting with film, the selected shot was optically reprinted to achieve the effect. With digital technologies, freezing your image has become as easy as tapping a few keys — so the real question becomes how and when should you use the freeze frame?Ways to Use ItFreeze frames can be used at the beginning and throughout your movie. It’s all a matter of setting the stylistic tone of your work. For example, you may want to give your title card a little extra punch as Soderbergh did in his 1998 film, Out of Sight (via Universal).Soderbergh continues his playful use of the freeze frame during the opening act of Out of Sight as a transitional device and as a way to introduce a new character (another great place to use freeze frames early in a film, especially if you are running voice over on your soundtrack). In his film, Election, Alexander Payne uses freeze frames during his character introductions for a comedic effect.Election via ParamountMartin Scorsese uses the freeze frame to great effect in films like Goodfellas, The Departed, and The Aviator, as you can see in this video compilation of Scorsese’s editing techniques. Justin Morrow includes freeze frames as one of Martin Scorsese’s influential editing techniques in this article.Freeze Frame as an EndingIt seems that the most common —and memorable — use of the freeze frame is at the end of films. Employed in this manner, the freeze frame can be a way to avoid showing gruesome details of a character’s demise and instead leave your viewers with a note of romance and ambiguity. Though many of these endings are the stuff of legend, this is your official spoiler alert.Instead of seeing the titular characters from Thelma and Louise (via MGM), plummet to the bottom of the Grand Canyon, we are left with their car hanging in mid-air, seemingly defying gravity as the two characters hang above a chasm representative of their situation both as outlaws and as rebellious women in a male-dominated world.Another famous use of the freeze frame as a substitute for a bloody finale can be found in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (via 20th Century Fox). When the two main characters are trapped and outgunned, they confront their fate head on.The freeze frame can present an opportunity to halt — and highlight — the atrocity of violence, as seen in the final frame of Gallipoli (1981). The splotch of blood on the main character’s chest echoes a shot early in the film when the same character races through the red ribbon of a finish line.Gallipoli via ParamountOne of the most famous freeze frame endings occurs in François Truffaut’s French New Wave classic, The 400 Blows. Although the final freeze frame does not suggest a violent death for the main character, Antoine Doinel, the image creates uncertainty, ambiguity, and concern for the life of Antoine.The 400 Blows via mk2 It’s not uncommon to use a freeze frame of the main character as a backdrop for conveying story information that happens after the plot of the film. Animal House (1978) uses this technique to a comic end, but the approach can have a more serious tone, as evidenced by the final freeze frame in Bloodsport (1988).Bloodsport via CannonWhile we’re considering Jean-Claude Van Damme’s involvement in the freeze frame ending, let’s not forget this classic pose from Street Fighter (1994).Street Fighter via ColumbiaThe freeze frame isn’t immune to parody, as made evident in the ending of Police Squad! (via Paramount and ABC).The freeze frame ending gives a moment of pause and consideration for your audience. Everything that preceded the final, frozen instant can take on additional dramatic weight and helps in the transformation of a seemingly ordinary film ending into a mythic one.Death Proof via The Weinstein CompanyWhat are some of your favorite freeze-frame moments? Please share in the comments below.last_img read more

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Three RCMP officers injured arresting Trans Mountain pipeline demonstrators

first_imgAt least 28 demonstrators were arrested at the site over the weekend after they zip-tied themselves to a gate.A B.C. Supreme Court judge issued an order preventing protesters from being within five metres of two works sites at Trans Mountain terminals in the Metro Vancouver city.The injunction is indefinite, allowing Trans Mountain to continue work that was approved by the federal government to twin the existing pipeline from Edmonton to Burnaby. BURNABY, B.C. — The RCMP say three officers suffered minor injuries while making arrests Monday evening at demonstrations against the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline in Burnaby, B.C.The Mounties say one officer suffered a head injury after being kicked, another suffered a knee injury and a third injured a hand.The four arrests between 7:30 p.m. and 10 p.m. Monday evening were in addition to 15 made earlier in the day.last_img read more

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Collision blocking Alaska Highway near Mile 112

first_imgUPDATE – Traffic is moving again in both directions in the area of the collision.FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Several eyewitnesses, report a collision near Mile 112 of the Alaska Highway.The collision is blocking the Alaska Highway in both directions and apparently involves a crew bus and another truck.  The RCMP have confirmed a crash has happened, but members have only just arrived on scene. If you’re travelling in the area, let us know what you see, email [email protected] any pictures or information.A photo of the traffic backed up along the Alaska Highway – SubmittedEyewitnesses tell Energeticcity.ca traffic is backed up for over a kilometre in both directions.As we get more information, we will update this post.last_img

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Fort St John Red Cross seeking volunteers

first_imgAccording to DeMedea, the Equipment Loan Program is only open a few days per week with hopes of expanding hours of operations with the help from more volunteers.“We’re currently only open three days a week but we’re looking for more volunteers to help meet the increasing demand on our program. With an ageing population and more demand on our Health Equipment Loan Services, we’d really love to increase our team in Fort St. John.”DeMedea says there are a number of different volunteer positions available at the Centre with the emphasis on recruiting more volunteers for Client Services.“We have a variety of roles. Right now we’d really like to highlight our Client Services Volunteer Role. So they’re really the face of the program, people will come in and the Client Services volunteers are really the people that look at the paperwork and answer questions and provide clients with the equipment that they need.”Other volunteer positions at the Red Cross include technicians and delivery drivers.DeMedea says they have roles for anyone who is willing to learn, adding that they provide on-the-job-training to any volunteer. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John chapter of the Canadian Red Cross is seeking volunteers for the new year.Canadian Red Cross Volunteer Recruitment Coordinator for B.C. and Yukon, Melissa DeMedea, says they are looking for volunteers to help run the Health Equipment Loan Program.“We are looking for more volunteers for our Health Equipment Loan Program in Fort St. John. So, my position as a Volunteer Recruitment Coordinator for B.C. and Yukon is I have the privilege of spreading the word about some really great volunteer opportunities that we have.” “We really look for people who are willing to learn and have a passion for working with people and because we fully train our volunteers, we are pretty confident that we can find a volunteer role to fit most people.”The Red Cross of Fort St. John is located at 9614 Sikanni Road, along the Alaska Highway.If you are interested in volunteering with the Canadian Red Cross, you can visit their website or contact them by email at [email protected]last_img read more

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Erika deadly heading to Turks Caicos and The Bahamas

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Bahamian music legend gunned down at home in Turks and Caicos Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 28 Aug 2015 – Tropical Storm Erika has done the worst; the storm is blamed now for as many as four deaths in Dominica where severe drought followed by the rainy system were too much for the steep terrain; it is reported that eight inches of rain fell in mere hours spawning landslides; 20 people are still missing, 80% of islanders there have no power. Erika had been described as poorly organized when she pummeled Dominica; next is Puerto Rico and Hispaniola where forecasters believe the mountains will shred the system which has grown tremendously to having winds extending 140 miles from the center and with gusts at 45mph.By tonight, the TCI will be experiencing the storm… Disaster Management and Emergencies has advised that there will be lots of wind in Provo. You can find the emergency shelter list and flood prone areas for your review posted at MagneticMediaTV.com or our social media. The TCI remains under Tropical Storm Warning as Erika moves west at 17mph and the center of the storm will move near the TCI according to the Bahamas Department of Meteorology. We are also warned that the amount of rainfall expected with Erika will likely bring moderate to severe flooding. Recommended for you Bi-lateral talks with Bahamas to resume, UK gives green light to high-level TCI delegation Related Items:bahamas, Dominica, hispanola, puerto rico, tropical storm erika, turks and caicos Post Maria: Dominica will rebuild with concretelast_img read more

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San Diego small restaurant owners to plead case against polystyrene foam ban

first_imgSan Diego small restaurant owners to plead case against polystyrene foam ban December 20, 2018 KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, Posted: December 20, 2018 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A group of small restaurant owners will speak out against the city of San Diego’s polystyrene ban Thursday, arguing that it disproportionately affects smaller businesses who may not be able to shoulder the costs of more expensive food containers.The owners of El Taco Rico, Tortilleria La Perla and other small and family-owned restaurants will discuss their opposition to the ban at El Taco Rico Thursday morning. The group of local restaurant owners say they’ve expressed their frustrations to San Diego City Council members in writing and in person but still feel they’re not being heard.The City Council tentatively approved the ban by a 5-3 vote Oct. 15, with then-City Councilman David Alvarez absent. The ordinance would ban the use and distribution within city limits of products like egg cartons, food containers, coolers, ice chests, pool or beach toys, mooring buoys and navigation markers made fully or partially of polystyrene foam, otherwise known by the commercial Dow Chemical Company designation, Styrofoam.The vote was not without heavy opposition from local business groups. One of the ban’s opponents, the San Diego Chapter of the California Restaurant Association, asserted that small food-service businesses could be forced to spend up to 145 percent more for polystyrene alternatives like compostable paper.“We are very concerned by the rush to pass a sweeping policy without data, without an economic analysis, without an (environmental impact report), and most importantly without addressing the realities the mandated costs will have on small mom and pop restaurants already struggling to make ends meet,” said Chris Duggan, the director of local government affairs for the CRA’s San Diego Chapter, after the council’s vote.The council will hold a second vote on the ordinance, as required by the city charter, some time in January. With council Democrats now holding a 6- 3 supermajority immune to Mayor Kevin Faulconer’s possible veto, the ban appears likely to take effect in early 2019. Businesses with fewer than $500,000 in annual profits are eligible for a 12-month waiver exempting them from the ban. Categories: Local San Diego News, Politics FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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