Parma ham tart tatin

first_imgTwitter WhatsApp THIS fabulous savoury tart is just right for a light lunch-time meal. When you caramelize the onions it heightens the flavour and intensity that the Parma ham brings to this dishWHAT YOU NEEDSign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up 50g butter3 large onions, sliced2 tsp caster sugar2 tsp balsamic or red wine vinegar1 tsp fresh thyme, chopped3 fresh figs, halved250g ready-to-use puff pastry, thawed if frozen12 slices Parma HamRocket or mixed salad leaves, to garnishWHAT TO DOPreheat the oven to 200degC /fan oven 180°C/gas mark 6. Melt 40g of the butter in a large frying pan. Add the onions and cook them over a medium heat until softened – about six to eight minutes. Add the sugar and cook gently until caramelised, then stir in the vinegar and thyme.Use the remaining butter to grease a shallow 20cm (8inch) baking tin. Arrange the figs in the base of the tin, cut sides down. Tip the onion mixture over them and level the surface. Roll out the puff pastry on a lightly floured surface and trim to a circle measuring 23cm (9inch) in diameter. Lift on top of the onion mixture and tuck the pastry edges down the sides of the tin. Bake for 20-25 minutes until risen and golden brown. Cool for about 10 minutes, then run a knife around the edge of the tin and invert the tart onto a serving plate. Serve whilst warm, topped with the slices of Parma Ham and garnished with rocket or mixed salad leaves. Facebook NewsParma ham tart tatinBy admin – October 2, 2009 715 Linkedincenter_img Print Email Advertisement Previous articleThe Met Opera, live in LimerickNext articleBite size food news adminlast_img read more

Read More »

$1.1 Billion in Bonds of Marquee U.S. Coal Company Plunge in Value

first_img$1.1 Billion in Bonds of Marquee U.S. Coal Company Plunge in Value FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg News:Bonds of Murray Energy Corp., the biggest privately owned U.S. coal producer, fell the most in 15 months after the White House denied the company’s request to aid one of its power-plant customers, an action it said would help both companies avoid bankruptcy.The miner’s $1.1 billion of 11.25 percent bonds due in 2021 fell 7 cents on the dollar on Wednesday and were quoted at 61 cents, according to Trace, the bond-price reporting system of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority. It was the biggest decliner and the most actively traded security in the U.S. corporate-bond market, the data show.The plunge came as President Donald Trump’s administration rejected Murray’s request to keep the coal-fired power plants of FirstEnergy Solutions Corp. operating by invoking emergency authorities under the Federal Power Act. The same bonds had surged last year in part on Trump’s election as the Republican vowed to revive America’s coal industry. The securities exceeded 83 cents on the dollar as recently as February.Robert E. Murray, the company’s chief executive officer and an early backer of Trump, said in a letter earlier this month that he was present when the president expressed support for the company’s plea and directed Energy Secretary Rick Perry to get it done.Murray Energy has debt payments of $44.4 million due at the end of September, another $59.4 million on Oct. 17 and $44.3 million at the end of the year, Murray’s Chief Financial Officer Robert D. Moore wrote in an Aug. 18 letter to Perry.Murray, a closely held company, produces about 65 million tons of the fossil fuel a year, according to the company’s website. It primarily operates in the country’s Northern Appalachian and Illinois coal basins and sells its coal to power plants operated by companies including FirstEnergy.More: Coal Miner Murray’s Bonds Drop After Trump White House Snublast_img read more

Read More »

Using behavioral economics to increase member savings and loyalty – without matching funds

first_imgGetting members to save more is the holy grail for many credit unions. Nearly every financial institution has some sort of plan or program or course to tackle this problem…so why has it not been fixed?I’m sure you’ve heard the statistics: two thirds of Americans don’t have enough money in savings to cover a $1,000 emergency, forcing them to turn to credit cards, loans from friends or family, payday lenders, or other means to cover the costs. Did you also know that nearly a third of Americans will never have enough money to retire…and one survey found that almost half of financial planners do not even have retirement plans? Yikes!This led me to ask: why is it so hard for people to save money—and why do so many initiatives to encourage saving fail? Using Behavioral Economics To NudgeBehavioral economics is the study of how the brain actually makes decisions – from what to buy, when to save, and whether or not to recycle. Because 99% of choices are made by the subconscious brain, it is really running the show. Unfortunately, it isn’t always logical, and there are a lot of rules it uses that keep people from saving.The problem with existing programs is they are built on the premise of what people “should” do (instead of what they will actually do). The great thing about the field of behavioral economics is it helps us understand how the brain makes decisions – even when people can’t tell you themselves what they will do. So, I put my theories to the test and ran a study on behalf of the Filene Research Institute with Point West Credit Union in Portland, Oregon.Filene Research Institute StudyIn my last article for CUinsight, I talked about the concept of time discounting (or the “I’ll start Monday” effect, as I like to call it). This concept is a huge barrier against getting people to save. We know what we should do (eat better, exercise, save for retirement) but our brains have a hard time actually doing what is best. So, overcoming this phenomenon was key. The study included 240 members from Point West Credit Union, divided into three groups to see if those who received the full impact of behavioral economics nudges (carefully worded letter, emails and a refrigerator magnet to track their savings) would save more and have increased loyalty scores (tracked via Net Promoter Score). I’m so excited to share that those in the magnet group did save more and had their average NPS score increase from 8.05 to 9.20! Want to learn what we did, and some tips on how to run experiments in your credit union? Check out the full report now. 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Melina Palmer Why do people say one thing and do another? What really drives behavior? How does the brain actually work – and how can we best communicate with it? What does that … Web: www.thebrainybusiness.com Detailslast_img read more

Read More »