UCLA — Drew honors grandfather on uniform

first_img Jones was a central figure in teaching his grandson about teamwork and to remain humble. He encouraged him in football and to take ballet lessons to aid his balance. Drew said he was told his grandfather suffered a mild heart attack, but paramedics couldn’t revive him. Drew left the Rose Bowl field midway through the fourth quarter. Tailback Adrian Peterson was suspended from practice Monday and Tuesday for missing too many classes, according to The Oklahoman. He is expected to play Saturday, but it was unclear whether he would start. Peterson, a Heisman Trophy candidate, ran for 220 yards and three touchdowns in last week’s win against Tulsa. “It’d be nice if that suspension was for a week, but it’s not,” UCLA coach Karl Dorrell said with a smile. “He’s going to play, and he’s going to get his 30 touches, one way or another.” Odds and ends Quarterback Ben Olson (broken hand) threw in practice, but still experienced soreness when throwing intermediate and long passes. His status for Saturday is uncertain. … Receiver Marcus Everett (shoulder) practiced and is expected to play. … Linebacker Wesley Walker (knee) practiced and could play in a backup role. … Plenty of tickets remain for the contest. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Junior tailback Maurice Drew, UCLA’s leading rusher, will honor his late grandfather by adding his last name to the back of his jersey for the rest of his collegiate career. His grandfather, Maurice Jones, died after suffering a heart attack in the stands during the second half of the win against Rice. When the Bruins face No. 21 Oklahoma at the Rose Bowl on Saturday, the back of his No. 21 jersey will read Jones-Drew. “I lived with him for more than half my life, so he was kind of like my dad,” Drew said. “My mom had to travel an hour to work every day, so she couldn’t take me to school. I stayed with him, so he took me to school every day. He taught me a lot of things.” center_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe top 10 theme park moments of 2019 “It’s tough, but he kind of prepared me beforehand a little bit by giving me little hints. He knew it was coming,” Drew said. “Just knowing that he died at a place like the Rose Bowl, where he loved to watch me play, and he was having fun while he was there. “The doctor told me he didn’t feel anything when it happened, so it makes it that much easier for me to work through it.” In the final game that Jones witnessed, Drew electrified the crowd with a 66-yard punt return for a touchdown. He also scored on a 4-yard run. Drew said he doesn’t think it will be emotionally challenging facing the Sooners at the Rose Bowl on Saturday. “The only thing that kind of gets my mind off of it is football,” Drew said. “I don’t want that to sound rude, but I know he would have wanted me to play football. That’s why I came here.” Peterson sits last_img read more

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Intra-African trade: going beyond political commitments

first_img27 August 2014Among Africa’s policy wonks, under-performing trade across the continent within the region is a favoured subject. To unravel the puzzle, they reel off facts and figures at conferences and workshops, pinpoint trade hurdles to overcome and point to the vast opportunities that lie ahead if only African countries could integrate their economies. It’s an interesting debate but with little to show for it until now.The problem is partly the mismatch between the high political ambitions African leaders hold and the harsh economic realities they face.Case in point: they have set up no less than 14 trading blocs to pursue regional integration. Yet they have shown “a distinct reluctance to empower these institutions, citing loss of sovereignty and policy space as key concerns,” says Trudi Hartzenberg, executive director at the Trade Law Centre for Southern Africa (Tralac), an organisation that trains people on trade issues. As a result of this reluctance, she says, “Regional institutions remain weak, performing mainly administrative functions.”Trade flourishes when countries produce what their trading partners are eager to buy. With a few exceptions, this is not yet the case with Africa. It produces what it doesn’t consume and consumes what it doesn’t produce.It’s a weakness that often frustrates policy makers; it complicates regional integration and is a primary reason for the low intra-regional trade, which is between 10% and 12% of Africa’s total trade. Comparable figures are 40% in North America and roughly 60% in Western Europe.Over 80% of Africa’s exports are shipped overseas, mainly to the European Union (EU), China and the US. If you throw into the mix complex and often conflicting trade rules, cross-border restrictions and poor transport networks, it’s hardly surprising that the level of intra-Africa trade has barely moved the needle over the past few decades.Not everybody agrees intra-Africa trade is that low. Some experts argue that a big chunk of the continent’s trade is conducted informally and at times across porous borders. Most borders, they point out, are often poorly managed or informal trade statistics are simply not included in the official flows recorded by customs officials.“We don’t have a way of capturing these types of activities because they’re informal,” said Carlos Lopes, the head of the UN Economic Commission for Africa (ECA), in an interview with Africa Renewal. The ECA, he explained, is planning to plug this information gap with a more precise picture of economic activities in Africa and give economic planners a better data set with which to work.Regional economic blocsTo accelerate regional integration, the World Bank is advising African leaders to expand access to trade finance and reduce behind-the-border trade restrictions such as excessive regulations and weak legal systems.Nevertheless, saddled with weak economies, small domestic markets and 16 landlocked countries, governments believe they can achieve economic integration by starting at the regional level and working their way up, merging all the regional trading blocs into an African Free Trade Area.But with 14 different trading blocs, critics say that’s just too many. Some blocs have overlapping members and many countries belong to multiple blocs.Yet, the challenge is not simply the number of trading blocs, experts say, but their track record. Governments need to implement their trade agreements. On this score, African countries perform poorly despite their strong political commitment to regional integration, notes Hartzenberg in her report, “Regional Integration in Africa”, published by the World Trade Organization, a global body on trade rules.“In some cases, the challenge is that there may still not be a clear commitment to rules-based governance in African integration; [not] taking obligations that are undertaken in international agreements seriously,” Hartzenberg said in an e-mail responding to questions from Africa Renewal. “Some argue that [African governments] need policy space to address the development challenges they face – but this does appear inconsistent with the signing of many regional agreements.” Lack of capacity to implement their obligations, she adds, is also to blame.The African Development Bank (AfDB) shares this view. Its analysis of regional integration and intra-trade in Africa imputed slow progress to “a complex architecture of regional economic communities”. While this arrangement has yielded positive steps towards common regional targets, says the bank, “progress has been disappointing”.Hartzenberg gave the example of the 15-member Southern African Development Community (SADC), a regional economic group, which launched a Free Trade Area in 2008. Despite the SADC’s decision to remove trade restrictions, she says, some countries have not eliminated tariffs as stipulated by the agreement. Worse still, in some cases countries that removed the tariffs have since reinstated them.To be fair, the SADC Trade Protocol has a provision that allows exemptions from phasing out tariffs. Some countries have applied for such exemptions, the Tralac executive director said, but others have simply reintroduced the tariffs or alternative instruments such as domestic taxes. “This can be argued to demonstrate a lack of political will to implement agreed obligations. It could well be that some member states recognise belatedly the implications of the agreement they have signed and no longer want to be bound by these obligations.”Poor infrastructureLack of progress in implementing agreement along with the absence of reliable transport, energy and information and technology infrastructure make the journey towards regional integration long and arduous. “Road freight moves incredibly slowly, while major ports are choked for lack of capacity,” observes the AfDB.Even with the current gains Africa is making in upgrading regional infrastructure, Ibrahim Mayaki, the head of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (Nepad), the African Union’s development arm, finds the continent still faces serious infrastructure shortcomings across all sectors, both in terms of access and quality. Nepad has just completed a 30-year plan that focuses on regional trans-border projects like the 4 500 kilometre highway from Algiers in Algeria to Lagos, Nigeria.Africa requires huge investments to develop, upgrade and maintain its infrastructure. The AfDB estimates the region would need to spend an additional US$40-billion a year on infrastructure to address not only current weaknesses but also to keep pace with economic growth.Sophisticated protectionism versus EPAsMany of the trade deals Africa signs with its partners ignore the continent’s efforts to promote intra-Africa trade, according to trade analysts.Nick Dearden, a former director of the Jubilee Debt Campaign and now with World Development Movement, a global advocacy group on poverty, accuses the West of pushing for free trade models that benefit their interests, not Africa’s. He complains that many African countries are “locked into trade agreements which keep them dependent on one or two commodities”.Writing on his blog hosted by The Guardian, Dearden says the EU is attempting to foist Economic Partnership Agreements [EPAs] on African countries. EPAs require EU trading partners to lower their tariffs on imports and exports on a reciprocal basis.Dearden warns that EPAs thwart Africa’s integration efforts, and he instead advises African leaders to follow South Korea’s example of using a “range of government interventions” to boost trade. These include, among others, protecting industries, controlling food production and banking, and passing strong regulations to ensure people benefit from trade and investment.Carlos Lopes of the ECA makes the same point. “Protection is not a bad word,” he asserts. He favours what he calls “sophisticated protectionism”, but cautions African leaders to “do it with sophistication, which means you need to strike the right balance”.The ECA boss views sophisticated or smart protectionism not as a choice between state and market, as if they “were two opposites”. His argument is that there cannot be industrialisation without some form of smart protectionism; and without industrialisation, Africa’s efforts to integrate its economies and increase intra-region trade are less likely to succeed.Free trade enthusiasts, however, argue that protectionist policies could shrink the size of the global economy, create few winners and leave everybody worse off.Beyond commitmentsThere is much that African countries need to do to increase intra-regional trade. For instance, they need to reduce dependence on commodities by expanding the services sector, including telecommunications, transport, educational and financial. They need to increase investments in infrastructure. And they need to eliminate or significantly reduce non-tariff barriers that are major roadblocks to intra-African trade.The list of non-tariff barriers is as long as it is comprehensive, ranging from prohibitive transaction costs to complex immigration procedures, limited capacity of border officials and costly import and export licensing procedures.For this to happen, it will take much more than political commitments; it will require practical steps on the ground, even if they come with some costs.This article was first published in Africa Renewal – produced by the Africa Section of the United Nations Department of Public Information, Africa Renewal provides up-to-date information and analysis of the major economic and development challenges facing Africa today.last_img read more

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Padlocks, RFID chips, and secret briefcases: an interview with a geocaching maniac

first_img SharePrint RelatedManiac cache: ‘QR Challenge’ — Geocache of the WeekMarch 13, 2019In “Community”Don’t Forget to Bring Your Brain — Antron’s Puzzle Box #2 (GC40M7T) — Geocache of the WeekMarch 20, 2013In “Community”Top Tips for Puzzle CachesAugust 12, 2014In “Learn” Gelderland is an emerging region when it comes cache creation; gadget caches, puzzle boxes, large caches, you name it! One of the prominent geocache hiders from that region is IronManiacGLD. His hides range from padlocked birdhouses and RFID chips in puzzle boxes, to secret briefcases straight from a James Bond movie.Many of these caches have a high percentage of Favorite points—not bad for a cacher who just started in 2017. These caches all have great attention to detail and a cerebral approach to them. IronManiacGLD is an expert in human behavior and specializes in lie detection. He says, one of the things that inspire him most are finding intricate field puzzles and thinking about how the cache owners thought through the process. While we all aren’t experts in human behavior, there is one important thing to remember: everyone is capable of creating awe-inspiring geocaches, you just have to harness your creativity and not be afraid to ask for help! Geocaching HQ: What’s your background outside of geocaching?I work as a sales trainer, an expert in human behavior and specialist in lie detection. I supervise and train people to better understand themselves and others. The human brain is extremely attractive to me—especially how someone makes decisions and makes choices. I therefore try to apply this knowledge to building and hiding maniac caches. Geocaching HQ: How and when did you hear about geocaching? It started a little more than a year ago. On television I saw a family in the forest searching for treasures. They really found something! A real container with goodies! First of all, I was surprised that something was actually hidden. It directly fascinated me. With the free app, it is now possible for everyone to immediately start searching for geocaches, and that is also how I started searching in my neighborhood. I was even more surprised to find out that dozens of geocaches were hidden in my immediate surroundings. Locations that I passed several times a day.Geocaching HQ: Which cache got you hooked? It was not a specific cache that convinced me. It was mainly the versatility of geocaching. The many different facets of geocaching intrigued me almost immediately. I came to locations where I otherwise would never have come. Even in my own immediate environment, I discovered beautiful locations as well as easy to find geocaches to very difficult (sneaky) hidden geocaches.But, there was one geocache that urged me to build and hide geocaches myself. That was the first geocache with a field puzzle: a bicycle with a chest. I had to remove the saddle to get to a key, then with the key I could open a chest. In that chest there was a locked geocache with hundreds of keys. That was challenge that gave me a lot of fun. Mainly the different steps to take gave me several euphoric moments and a wonderful feeling. My creative brain immediately started to run at full speed. After several weeks I hid my first maniac cache: ‘Get Twisted‘  as a result.Geocaching HQ: What is the story behind your username? That choice was made quickly by me. For years I have been nicknamed ‘Ironman’ because of my surname: IJzermans. In Dutch, ‘IJzer’ means Iron and because of my creative brain nerve, I decided to change ‘Man’ to ‘Maniac.’ The addition GLD is linked to the region where I live and where my caches can be found.Geocaching HQ: What is your favorite cache(s) you’ve found? I have an absolute preference for finding challenging field puzzles and creative geocaches. Understanding the thoughts of the CO and how they want you to open a cache is intriguing for me. I just recently found a very creative and challenging cache. A combination of good woodworking and fantastically elaborated steps to get to the logbook. I was really impressed by the creativity of the CO. That is always very inspiring and stimulating for me when I want to come up with a new maniac cache. Geocaching HQ: What keeps you engaged with the game?I have a very high sense of responsibility for everything I do, including for building and hiding geocaches. I want to offer everyone a nice experience so that requires thorough maintenance. A lost geocache or a full logbook is usually replaced by me within one day. Sometimes even within a few hours. But I am also very critical about already placed geocaches or locations. I will always see if I can improve the geocache, the way of hiding, or improve the location for the ultimate experience. In addition, I always try to listen to feedback from geocachers because I want to keep them satisfied.Geocaching HQ: For you, what makes a quality cache? A good geocache must, in my opinion, meet a number of conditions: In any case, permission must always be arranged with the legal landowner. I always try to involve the landowner with my idea. And that often results in an even better and more beautiful geocache or location. In addition, I also inform any local residents in the vicinity of the hiding place. A geocache must be solidly constructed and installed, and sensitive to the (Dutch) weather. Rain and moisture are mostly the biggest enemies of a geocache (next to muggles). Every geocache deserves a good listing with a clear layout. With information about the area and a clear hint. I think it is important to avoid making other search for too long (muggles) and to minimize damage to the environment of the hiding place. The hiding place also requires extra attention. Is the location safe for geocachers? And is the route to get to the hiding place safe enough? Geocaching HQ: What’s the best approach to creating a geocache? Embrace your enthusiasm! The first questions you should ask yourself are, “Why do I want to hide a geocache? What is the reason of hiding a geocache? Is it because of the beautiful area, the fantastic walk through the woods or a creative and beautiful build geocache?”Depending on the answers, you then have to think about the hiding place. You also take into account the seasons in the year. A good hiding place in the summer, for example, may suddenly be a wrong choice in the winter, or vice versa.Geocaching HQ: If someone reading this was looking for inspiration, what words of advice would you give them?It is obviously important that you know and understand the rules and conditions. Help from an experienced CO is therefore absolutely recommended, and discuss your idea with a reviewer so that you comply with those rules and conditions. Perhaps the most important thing is that you have the geocache, coordinates and listing checked and tested by other geocachers. Nothing is more annoying than, for example, if someone is searching at the wrong location (coordinates) or having no clue how to open a cache. Geocaching HQ: You have a number of complicated and intricate caches. Do you find it difficult to provide maintenance on them? All my caches are in the neighborhood or on the route. If I have to, I am at a cache of mine within a few minutes. Replacing full logbooks is currently taking the most time. But I do not mind doing that at all. Because I regularly visit my geocaches so that I can immediately assess whether maintenance is needed. An additional advantage is that I often meet geocachers along the way to chat with. My intricate maniac caches sometimes have a problem: that it was not always clear what geocachers have to do and so they try everything to open the cache. Crawling into the head of a geocacher and having caches tested has resulted in less maintenance in the field. A clear listing and hint also contribute to less maintenance and more fun for the geocachers.Geocaching HQ: Have you ever had an idea that you thought was impossible? “I have never tried that before, so I think I should definitely be able to do that!” is a well- known statement by Pippi Longstocking and I believe in that too. In principle everything is possible. I’m actually not very skilled at woodworking or anything like that. I just start building and step by step I realize my idea into a maniac cache. I only need a little more time than a real carpenter. For example, it can happen I drilled a hole to realize seconds later that the drilled hole is not logical or practical at all. But finally, I will create the cache I had in mind. What ideas do you have for a creative geocache? Have you been on the edge waiting for the right moment? Perhaps it’s now! Share your ideas in the comments below.Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

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