Middlebury wants public input on plan for 2030

first_img Previous articleFree Fishing this weekend in IndianaNext articleWorkOne centers to being reopening June 8 Carl Stutsman Pinterest By Carl Stutsman – June 4, 2020 0 327 Pinterest Middlebury wants public input on plan for 2030 Facebook Twitter Facebook WhatsApp Google+ Google+ Twitter WhatsApp IndianaLocalNews Credit: Town of Middlebury FB Page Middlebury is looking for more community engagement as they look to update a plan for the town’s future in 2030. The idea behind the “Middlebury 2030 Comprehensive Plan” is to lay out, in one document, a vision for what Middlebury wants to look like in ten years and the best strategies to get there.What they want is public input and ideas as the make potential revisions. The plans steering committee said in a release “This Plan will continue to encourage and support the ‘Makers’ spirit and the passing on the traditional values” of Middlebury.READ MORE HERE WITH THE ELKHART TRUTHThey are holding a virtual public open house June 23rd to talk about the 2030 plan and its implementation.last_img read more

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NYSEG employees deliver gifts to families in need

first_imgEmployees then take a name tag and the wish list and go out shopping for that child. A partnership 30 years in the making, NYSEG is given a list of children ages infant to 17 and an accompanying wish list. “Its always very important to get back involved in the local community, everyone here that participates loves that working with the community and the communities they live in.” said Lori Cole the Coordinator for Gift Giving Tree at NYSEG. NYSEG provided gifts for 85 children in the community.center_img BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — NYSEG is once again collaborating with the Family and Children’s Society of Binghamton to deliver gifts to families in need. Today at the NYSEG headquarters, employees were loading up their cars with all the gifts to be delivered to the Family and Children’s Society.last_img read more

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FOOD SAFETY NEWS SCAN: Top 10 risky foods, ground beef vulnerabilities

first_imgOct 6, 2009 News investigation finds safety gaps in ground beef production Leafy greens top food safety watchdog’s risky listThe food safety watchdog group Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) today released a report on the 10 riskiest foods regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Drawn from the CSPI’s database of outbreaks confirmed by the official postings between 1990 and 2006, the list includes leafy greens, eggs, tuna, oysters, potatoes, cheese, ice cream, tomatoes, sprouts, and berries. At a media briefing today, Carolyn Smith DeWaal, CSPI’s food safety program director, said tuna and oysters made the list, even though producers are required to have “hazard analysis and critical control point” (HACCP) plans. She said the findings of the study add urgency to the passage of a key food safety bill, which passed the US House of Representatives but awaits action in the Senate. She said HACCP plans don’t work unless they’re enforced. Peter Hurley, the father of a young Oregon boy who was sickened in a recent peanut butter Salmonella outbreak, said 50 victims of foodborne illnesses and their families will gather in Washington, DC, on Oct 10 to meet with legislators and ask them to forward the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act to the floor of the Senate for a vote.Oct 6 CSPI press releaseCSPI report on 10 riskiest foods regulated by the FDAhttp://cspinet.org/new/pdf/cspi_top_10_fda.pdfcenter_img Despite several Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks linked to ground beef over the past few years, the product is still vulnerable to contamination, because packers grind meat from different sources into their hamburger but aren’t required to test the samples for E coli, the New York Times reported on Oct 4. The Times traced the burger eaten by a Minnesota woman who was sickened by contaminated ground beef in the fall of 2007 but is still recovering. The investigation also found that big companies, to avoid the possibility of recalls, sometimes agree to sell only to companies that won’t test their products. The probe also found that the company didn’t follow its own safety rules. In response to the story, US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack said in a press release yesterday that the events in the story are “unacceptable and tragic” and that the nation needs to do more to protect Americans. He said the USDA has been active in its contributions to President Obama’s Food Safety Working Group, which has launched several measures to make ground beef safer, such as requiring inspectors to test additional trim components that go into ground beef. He said the USDA is also exploring ways to enhance traceback methods.Oct 4 New York Times storyhttp://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33164820/ns/health-food_safety/Oct 5 USDA press releasehttp://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usdahome?contentidonly=true&contentid=2009/10/0491.xmllast_img read more

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UK regulator sets out three-year plan as budget doubles for auto-enrolment

first_imgThe Pensions Regulator (TPR) has set out its three-year plan and resource allowance until 2018 as the body plans a rapid jump in expenditure to cope with auto-enrolment.The UK body, generally funded through a levy on pension schemes, with state support for auto-enrolment, will spend £136.8m (€186m) on regulation in 2017-18 compared with just £62.6m the current year.However, while the regulator is set to increase expenditure down the line, it has reduced its planned expenditure for the coming 2015-16 year from £84.8m to £76m.The Brighton-based organisation also under-spent in the 2014-15 year, which ends this month, after making delays in staff recruitment due to “restructuring” last summer and over-estimating on provisions and contingencies for auto-enrolment. For 2015-16, the organisation will see its headcount increase from 452 to 499.However, the number currently being employed is significantly lower than its forecasts last year, which said it would employ 583 staff.Over the next year, the regulator said it would continue its focus on ensuring smaller companies complied with their auto-enrolment duties.However, it would also have a significant focus on revising its Defined Contribution (DC) Code.This is due to the regulator’s adapting to the Budget freedoms, which will see a shift in the way people access their pension savings at retirement, with compulsory annuitisation no longer applicable.It is also expecting to create the regulatory environment for the 75 basis point charge cap that will be in place for auto-enrolment default investment funds in trust-based DC schemes.TPR said it would also monitor the defined benefit (DB) to DC transfer market, which could see an increase in activity due to the Budget freedoms, and intervene where appropriate.Chief executive Lesley Titcomb said the organisation’s work would be dominated by the DC at-retirement market transformation, evolving scam models and risks within the DB market.“During a time of such significant change, it is important the regulator be seen as an authoritative, trusted voice within the pensions sector,” she said.“The corporate plan sets out how we will provide trustees, employers and advisers with the information they need to see these major changes through.“Where we take regulatory action, I want that to be transparent and for our actions to be understood.”TPR chairman Mark Boyle added: “It is vital we reach all our audiences, remain on top of market developments, anticipate future risks and work collaboratively with government departments and industry bodies to ensure the overall retirement system runs smoothly.”Over the next three years, the regulator will also implement its new DB Code of Funding that it created to implement a new statutory objective.The code was widely accepted among the UK industry and sees the implementation of a new, holistic, risk-based model of DB funding.In October last year, Boyle said TPR was working to create guidance for DB and DC trustees, and that it would assert its presence in the European regulatory agenda.last_img read more

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Wellington-Andale live tweets

first_imgp class=”p1″>Follow us on Facebook.Follow us on Twitter.< Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post's comments through... RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog's comments through... RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in... Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

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Muros Grounded Due to Lack of Danger Warnings

first_imgzoom Spain-flagged bulk carrier Muros, which grounded off Norfolk in December 2016, ran into trouble following a change of route to an unsafe area and lack of warnings of danger, according to UK’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB).An investigation into the incident, which occurred on December 2 while the ship was sailing from Teesport, UK to Rochefort, France, showed that the vessel was following a planned track across Haisborough Sand.The passage plan in the electronic chart display and information system (ECDIS) had been revised by the second officer less than 3 hours before the grounding and it had not been seen or approved by the master.A visual check of the track in the ECDIS using a small-scale chart did not identify it to be unsafe, and warnings of the dangers over Haisborough Sand that were automatically generated by the system’s ‘check route’ function were ignored, MAIB said.The investigation revealed that the second officer monitored the vessel’s position using the ECDIS but did not take any action when the vessel crossed the 10 meter safety contour into shallow water. Although the bulker’s electronic navigation equipment was functioning correctly, the echo sounder had been switched off shortly after leaving Teesport.Furthermore, the efectiveness of the second officer’s performance “was impacted upon by the time of day and a very low level of arousal and she might have fallen asleep periodically,” MAIB said, adding that the disablement of the ECDIS alarms removed the system’s barriers that could have alerted the second officer to the danger in time for successful avoiding action to be taken.At the time of the grounding on Haisborough Sand on the east coast of UK the ship was loaded with fertiliser. Attempts to manoeuvre clear of the shallows were unsuccessful but the vessel was re-foated 6 days later with tug assistance.There were no injuries and no pollution, but damage to Muros’s rudder necessitated the vessel being towed to Rotterdam, Netherlands, for repair.MAIB also concluded that the ECDIS on board Muros had not been used as expected by the regulators or equipment manufacturers.After investigated several grounding incidents in which the way the vessels’ ECDIS was confgured and utilised was contributory, the Board launched a safety study, in collaboration with the Danish Maritime Accident Investigation Board, designed to more fully understand why operators are not using ECDIS as envisaged.last_img read more

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