Postdoctoral Associate (Neurodegenerative Diseases) – LaVoie Lab (65073)

first_imgA Postdoctoral Associate position is available in the LaVoie Lab inthe Center for Translational Research in Neurodegenerative Diseaseat the McKnight Brain Institute. The overall goal of the LaVoie Labis to elucidate the earliest molecular events responsible for adultonset neurodegenerative diseases. The lab approaches thesedevastating disorders from both the perspective that specificinherited gene mutations linked to familial forms can providevaluable insight, as well as maintaining a focus on aspects of thefar more common sporadic forms. The research is funded and directedby Professor Matthew LaVoie in the Department of Neurology and thelab employs a diverse array of state-of-the-art tools to accomplishthese goals including a series of novel knockin animal models,iPSC-based neuronal and glial cultures, and CRISPR/Cas9 genomeediting.The LaVoie Lab is located in a vibrant neuroscience researchatmosphere that includes the Center for Translational Research inNeurodegenerative Disease, the Biomedical Sciences Center, theCenter for Neurogenetics, the McKnight Brain Institute and theFixel Institute for Neurologic Disorders. The successful applicantwill join dedicated, experienced and highly motivated researchersand collaborators. The research is fast-paced and exciting, thelaboratories are modern and well-equipped, and there are superbopportunities for advanced training in relevant techniques.A recent PhD, MD or MD/PhD, and experience in a field directlyrelevant to neurodegenerative diseases. Applicants should haveexcellent oral and written communication skills, and experience inthe collection and analysis of data. Preferred candidates will havea strong record of productivity from previous training experiences.They must have a high level of independence in the design andexecution of in vitro and in vivo experiments.Salary will be commensurate with experience andqualifications.The successful applicant would join a team studying familialParkinson’s disease centered on pathogenic mutations in the Parkinand LRRK2 genes. Parkin is a ubiquitin E3 ligase which is highlyexpressed in neurons. Autosomal recessive, loss-of-functionmutations in the Parkin gene are associated with an often earlyonset form of Parkinson’s disease. The appointment represents asuperb training opportunity to learn/apply skills in cell culture,iPSC maintenance and differentiation, and primary cell culture workfrom novel mouse models. High content image analysis, along with adiverse array of biochemical assays will be used routinely.Applications should include a CV, cover letter of intent, and alist of 3 references with contact information. Review ofapplications will begin immediately and will continue untilposition is filled. Questions may be directed to Dr. Matthew LaVoieat [email protected]; however, applications must be submitted online.All candidates for employment are subject to a pre-employmentscreening which includes a review of criminal records, referencechecks, and verification of education.The selected candidate will be required to provide an officialtranscript to the hiring department upon hire. A transcript willnot be considered “official” if a designation of “Issued toStudent” is visible. Degrees earned from an educational institutionoutside of the United States require evaluation by a professionalcredentialing service provider approved by the National Associationof Credential Evaluation Services (NACES), which can be found at http://www.naces.org/ .The University of Florida is an equal opportunity institutiondedicated to building a broadly diverse and inclusive faculty andstaff. Searches are conducted in accordance with Florida’s SunshineLaw. If an accommodation due to disability is needed in order toapply for this position, please call (352) 392-2477 or the FloridaRelay System at (800) 955-8771 (TDD).#category=35The University of Florida is committed to non-discrimination withrespect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex,sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, marital status,national origin, political opinions or affiliations, geneticinformation and veteran status in all aspects of employmentincluding recruitment, hiring, promotions, transfers, discipline,terminations, wage and salary administration, benefits, andtraining.last_img read more

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Central Islip Home Invasion Suspects Charged

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Two men were arrested for pistol-whipping a Central Islip home invasion victim this week, Suffolk County police said.Carlos Morales, 26, and 24-year-old Dawon Brown, both of Jamaica, were charged burglary, robbery, criminal use of a firearm and criminal possession of a weapon.Third Squad detectives alleged the duo kicked in the rear door of house on East Walnut Street and demanded money from the victim shortly after 8 a.m. Tuesday.Police said the duo jumped out of windows on the second floor in an attempt to flee when they realized officers had the house surrounded before they were taken into custody.Bail for Morales and Brown was set at $150,000 bond or $100,000 cash. They are due back in court Friday.last_img read more

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Petition calls for Rossier to act after racist comment

first_imgDoctoral student Gina Loring created the petition after students made racially-charged comments in a class offered by the Rossier School. (Daily Trojan file photo)A doctoral student at the Rossier School of Education created a petition that has garnered over 600 signatures as of Sunday asking the School to implement accountability practices after a classroom incident she described as racially-charged and offensive last month.“‘Women of color should be ‘sterilized.’ — This profoundly racist statement was made in one of my classes and the instructor accommodated it, so I created a petition to generate accountability,” the petition written by student Gina Loring read.Loring, who is a woman of color, said that while discussing ways to increase the number of women of color who receive prenatal care during an in-class assignment, some students suggested sterilizing women of color and taking their babies at birth would alleviate the issue.“Imagine if the prompt had said, ‘How do we clean up the homeless problem in Los Angeles?’” Loring said. “And imagine if their suggestion had been, ‘We should round them up and shoot them because that would get rid of the homeless problem.’” Loring said she was stunned by the comments. She cited the history of eugenic sterilization and the current separations of immigrant families as reasons for her bewilderment. After the comments were written and quickly deleted, Loring said she told her professor Kim Hirabayashi, who assured her the comments would be addressed. According to Loring, the professor addressed the comments by encouraging a brief in-class conversation. “[The professor] then proceeded to open class with a vague statement about the incident, at no point addressing the comments directly,” the petition read. “The incident was thus not only left without resolution, it was magnified.”Another student of color in the class said learning has been impacted because the majority of students in the “Challenges in Urban Education: Learning” class are people of color. Loring said six students reached out to her expressing discomfort with how the incident was handled, but did not feel comfortable speaking about it publicly.Hirabayashi told the Daily Trojan in an email that she would not comment until a resolution has been finalized within the school.Rossier Dean Karen Symms Gallagher said the school is aware of Loring’s petition and is currently reviewing the matter. “Our goal is to find an inclusive resolution that reflects both our commitment to an open exchange of ideas and our mission to teach students to value and respect the cultural history and the identities of those around them,” Gallagher wrote to the Daily Trojan. In the weeks following the incident, Loring filed a Title IX incident report and dropped the course from her record with a full refund, but said Rossier has not communicated with her since then.Loring said she chose to attend USC, and specifically pursue a degree at the Rossier School because of its progressive mission statement, and said that she does not believe this situation reflects those values.  Loring’s petition asks Rossier to publicly acknowledge the incident and implement workshops about critical race theory for Hirabayashi and the students involved. Loring and one of her classmates said they do not believe the students who made the comments are suited for the program. “I don’t see how USC could, in good conscience, send students out into the world with a doctorate degree in educational leadership who hold these kinds of beliefs or even would have these thoughts in the first place,” Loring said.Loring said she viewed the incident as a microcosm of issues surrounding gender and race that persist in United States today. “We know from history that when unethical statements and unethical actions are left unchecked time and time again, it becomes worse and worse with time,” Loring said. “You end up with horrific things happening because the masses were quiet.”Editor’s note: A correction was made to Loring’s quote “Imagine if the cops had said, ‘How do we clean up the homeless problem in Los Angeles?’” It has been updated to correctly reflect Loring’s statement.last_img read more

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