Russia: Submarines Dmitry Donskoy, Yuru Dolgoruky Return to Sevmash

first_img View post tag: Yuru June 22, 2011 Russia: Submarines Dmitry Donskoy, Yuru Dolgoruky Return to Sevmash View post tag: Russia View post tag: Dmitry View post tag: Donskoy View post tag: Naval View post tag: Return Industry news View post tag: Navy View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Submarines View post tag: Dolgoruky Back to overview,Home naval-today Russia: Submarines Dmitry Donskoy, Yuru Dolgoruky Return to Sevmash Nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines (SSBN) Dmitry Donskoy and Yury Dolgoruky on June 18 returned from the first trials in this year. The subs were met by top-ranking naval officers and directors of Sevmash shipyard.Submarine commanding officers Oleg Tsybin and Vladimir Shirin along with the shipyard’s engineers-in-charge Evgeny Slobodian and Nikolai Semakov reported to White Sea Naval Base Commander Viktor Liina and acting Director General of JSC Sevmash Andrei Diachkov that the trial had been successfully completed.The cruise participants made summaries on the trial program at a meeting held after the subs’ arrival. The crews and trial teams feel well and are ready for new trial phases after supply replenishment.[mappress]Source: rusnavy, June 22, 2011; View post tag: Sevmash Share this articlelast_img read more

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Animals from Junk by Chance

first_imgHow to build an animal: throw junk DNA at it.  That seems to be the latest idea on where higher animals came from.  A press release from University of Bristol posted on Science Daily and EurekAlert announced, “‘Junk DNA’ Can Explain Origin And Complexity Of Vertebrates, Study Suggests.”    The basic idea, coming from scientists at Dartmouth College and University of Bristol, is that a proliferation of micro-RNAs appeared in early vertebrates like lampreys that was “unparalleled in evolutionary history.”  The scientists compared genomes of living fish (sharks and lampreys) and invertebrates like the sea squirt.    Because micro-RNAs are implicated in higher organisms, the circumstantial evidence convinced them of a correlation: “Most of these new genes are required for the growth of organs that are unique to vertebrates, such as the liver, pancreas and brain,” said Philip Donoghue of Bristol.  “Therefore, the origin of vertebrates and the origin of these genes is no coincidence.”    Dr. Kevin Peterson of Dartmouth put the discovery into a larger context: “This study not only points the way to understanding the evolutionary origin of our own lineage, but it also helps us to understand how our own genome was assembled in deep time.”There you have it: the Darwin Party buzzwords necessary to make the eyes glaze over: deep time, understanding, evolutionary origin, zzzz.  While you were sleeping you didn’t see the magic tricks.  They threw junk at a sea squirt and poof!  A pancreas emerged!  then a liver!  then a brain!    So happy Darwin Day.  Stop thinking so hard.  Join the party.  Have some fun.  Get involved in this game – blind man’s bluff.(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Transforming lives through sport

first_imgHoops 4 Hope participants constructinga basketball court. Mark Crandall, who founded Hoops 4Hope with basketball heavyweightThierry Kita. Zanele Manyube and Thierry Kita.Manyube, who has been with Hoops 4Hope since she was eight years old, isnow an All Star, responsible for 100children.By Lusanda NgcaweniHoops 4 Hope (H4H) is a Cape Town-based non-profit organisation that uses sport as a channel to reach children (aged from eight to 16) from impoverished communities and teach them life skills. It was started 13 years ago by former US exchange student and basketball player, Mark Crandall, and local basketball heavyweight Thierry Kita.The duo, who both have a passion for community work, believe that sport is a powerful way to get youth off the streets. They use this opportunity to empower them with tools to help them become responsible young people who are able to make informed choices about the challenges they are faced with daily.“Our ‘Skills for life’ programme deals with issues such as HIV/Aids, conflict resolution, drugs and substance abuse, resilience, gender issues, empathy, focus, integrity, responsibility and time management,” says Kita. These are taught parallel with sports skills.Children among the groups who show leadership potential are “promoted” to become MVPs (most valuable people) and they take over the coaching and life skills training on a voluntary basis. MVPs who are interested then graduate to become All Stars, a salaried full-time position at H4H. They are given the responsibility of managing an entire community, which involves setting up teams, registering them for basketball league, organising tournaments and liaising with the MVPs.They also have about 100 volunteers from South Africa and abroad. With the help of community members, H4H has built about 29 basketball courts in 12 communities.“Together they manage Freedom Day programmes with 500 kids, Youth Day with 600 kids and World Aids Day with 1 000 kids; and they run these events with absolutely no pressure,” Kita says about his young team. He describes the MVPs and All Stars as the “heart and soul of the programme”.“Our model is based on getting young people educating and mentoring young people,” says Crandall. “They can talk about sensitive issues to their peers while building trust, respect and friendship – in their own communities and their own language. We are also building role models that the communities need.”Zanele Manyube is one such role model. She first got involved with H4H when she was eight years old and has been with them ever since. This 19-year-old “went up the ranks”, first becoming an MVP, then an All Star and is now responsible for 100 children from four different schools.She credits part of H4H’s success to the small groups that give children, who wouldn’t necessarily speak up in class, an opportunity to come out of their shell. Furthermore, the rowdy ones who are disruptive in class tend to behave well in a sporting environment. “The H4H teams are divided into groups of 12-to-15 children and the genders are split up. Our life skills programme is interactive and involves a lot of role playing, which is something that a teacher with 45 children in a co-ed class does not get the opportunity to do.”Manyube says H4H contributed to her making “strange choices that have kept me on the right road”. She lists the insidiousness of peer pressure among the things that she has learned. “Some friends can put pressure on you in such a way that you think you’re still in control, but in actual fact you’re not. H4H gives you guidance, but does not make choices for you. I do not regret any of the choices I’ve made, because they’ve been informed choices.”“Zanele is a perfect example of the cycle we’re trying to create in getting the kids involved,” says Crandall about his apprentice. “She is a role model who is teaching children who in turn can be role models for the next generation.”Live for lifeH4H’s interactive HIV/Aids programme, “Live for life” is so effective that it caught the attention of Basketball Without Borders, a programme run be the National Basketball Association (NBA) in the US. For three years now H4H has been partnering with Basketball Without Borders to run the annual NBA Camp in Johannesburg, which is now in its fifth year.One hundred teenagers who show the most promise are scouted from all over the continent by three NBA coaches. They are flown to Johannesburg where they spend an entire week with 20 NBA coaches and 10 NBA players, while H4H takes care of the life skills element. Says Kita: “I am encouraged to see our All Stars successfully managing this camp. The NBA reckons we run the best life skills programme out of all the NBA Basketball Without Borders, including Europe and China.”In fact, the Live for Life programme was instrumental in getting H4H funding for Ukusa (isiXhosa for “a new dawn”), the drug and substance abuse intervention programme they’re launching in May this year. “We started acknowledging that tik is a huge problem among Western Cape youth, so we actively looked for sponsorship,” says Kita. “The United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime (UNODC) acknowledged the potential we have in dealing with HIV/Aids and recognised that we are the best people for the job.”Ukusa’s success can be attributed to its high retention of youth, through sports. “The closer we keep them to H4H, the higher their chances of beating drug and substance abuse,” Kita says.Another big Skills for Life tool is conflict mediation. H4H is running an inter-cultural programme where every month they bring together children from different races, cultures, genders and economic and social backgrounds. These monthly events culminate in a big annual event where H4H also brings in schools from the US and Europe. “Sport has a cross-cultural understanding, it is an equaliser that puts you in a neutral place and allows you to learn a lot through each other,” says Crandall.Soccer 4 HopeH4H’s latest offshoot is Soccer 4 Hope (S4H) in partnership with Grassroots Soccer, which works very closely with Fifa. “We launched S4H in March 2007 in two schools with two coordinators,” says Kita. “We are now in 16 schools and have 24 coordinators. The growth has been quick, but that is the power of soccer! We’ve even been sponsored with a Mercedes Benz Sprinter bus.”“We mirrored the same programme as H4H,” Crandall adds. “So it was an easy transition. But this time we’re focussing on girls, who have been hugely left out. This is not about creating the best soccer team, but getting kids off the streets, about saving lives.”But that is not to say that their children aren’t at the top of their games. In fact, basketball players who have gone through the H4H rights of passage have always been some of the best in the Western Province, and others have even gone national.“Our strength remains life skills, and as such we have created lessons that help girls deal with challenges associated with gender and risk, and gender and culture,” Kita continues. “It is extremely difficult to be a girl in Africa with the challenges of HIV/Aids and gender violence being part of the culture.”Border crossingH4H, which recently launched in Xai-Xai, Mozambique, has its biggest programme in Zimbabwe, where about 7 800 children participate on a daily basis. “Zim produces a lot of excitement for the youth,” says Kita. “We’re effectively running leagues and championships there. Last month we shipped a container full of sporting goods and a school bus, which allows the kids to move from one competition to the next.”Crandall picks up the story. “We call that our miracle shipment because it arrived in Zim and cleared customs two weeks before the elections! This was a 40ft container with 6 000 pairs of sneakers crammed into a typical American, 20-passenger yellow school bus.”FundraisingH4H has always had a big reaction in the US – where both Crandall and Kita raise funds – and that response continues to grow. They receive shipments of uniforms and sneakers and other equipment. “These things are the hardest for kids to get here, yet in the US kids get a new pair of sneakers all the time, and schools can afford to get new uniforms every five years or so,” says Crandall. “The power of a uniform is that it is a suit of armour for an athlete, it sets him or her apart from the rest.”Crandall spends six months of the year back home in the US where he runs summer basketball camps. “When I show the kids there pictures of where I spend half of the year, they want to be involved. We’ve created a movement in the US where advantaged kids organise sneaker drives in schools. We encourage them to write messages to the recipients on the sneakers. An 11-year-old recently organised a basketball fundraiser with his friends where he raised US $300 in one day. Another kid did an ad for H4H on You Tube. We get emails from kids who say their birthdays or bar mitzvahs are coming up, and they want to use this special day to support other kids. That is the power of sport; the kids connect to the idea of being able to help other kids and they are excited to communicate through soccer or basketball.”H4H has cultivated relationships with international universities, and students volunteer with H4H because “they know we run successful youth programmes”, says Kita. “Kids fundraise to come here. Right now we have a kid from San Francisco who did a sneaker drive to raise funds to get here.”A few months ago H4H opened an office in New York to be able to raise funds more effectively. The organisation has the support of celebrity New York DJ Bobbito Garcia, who gets celebrities such as basketball legend Magic Johnson and singer/rapper Missy Elliot to donate signed sneakers. These are auctioned to raise funds for H4H. Garcia has also done a You Tube ad for H4H on ESPN.Kita is a guest assistant coach with the NBA’s New York Knicks and Boston Celtics. He has a great relationship with the two teams, which he spends time with during the NBA season. Two of the NBA’s top coaches, Larry Brown and Doc Rivers, also support H4H’s fundraising initiatives.One of H4H’s major challenges, though, is securing local funding. “There is such a high demand among communities that want to be involved that we need to hire more people,” says Kita. “The problem is that we’re perceived as a sporting organisation, but if you come half a step closer, you’ll see that our activities are actually life skills. What we do can affect many kids’ behavioural changes, which is key. We recently did a fundraising drive with local Glamour magazine, and that opened a lot of doors, but we have to do more.”Where to from here?H4H has recently opened a youth centre in partnership with Ikamva Labantu, also a non-profit organisation, at the Guguletu Sports Centre in Cape Town. The centre is open daily and young people can participate in a wide range of sporting activities, including chess. There is also a computer centre and HIV testing and counselling services.“As part of our extension plan we have outreach programmes running in Limpopo and Johannesburg,” says Kita. “By next year we will be running fully in Limpopo and the Eastern Cape, and in the next three-to-five years we will have a programme running in Soweto.”Useful linksHoops 4 HopeBasketball Without BordersIkamva Labantulast_img read more

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Land Cruisers, blankets and snow

first_imgLesotho’s inhospitable, snow-covered highlands are home to a hardy people who nonetheless battle in the cold. The Land Cruiser Club of Southern Africa handed out almost 400 blankets toneedy communities in Lesotho.(Imagse: Kath Fourie) MEDIA CONTACTS • Elmarie de Marillac  Four Wheel Drive Club of SA  +27 861 393 272 RELATED ARTICLES • Riders saving lives in Lesotho • Lesotho lodge a top pick for 2010 • Bikers gear up for Toy Run 2010 • SA comics team up for charity • Wartrail: a winter wonderlandKath FourieAs I walk away from the St James lodge in Mokhotlong region in the remote highlands of Lesotho, the blurred scenes of the day flash through my somewhat frazzled brain.I’ve been snapping pics since 7:30am, travelling through the eastern reaches of the tiny kingdom, which at this time of year is a harsh, dry, bleached, frozen landscape.Stretching my legs while the members of the Land Cruiser Club Southern Africa (LCCSA) sort out who is sleeping where for the night, I come across three tiny girls with shaved heads each wielding a knife. They reach my hip in height and I wonder what they’re up to as they peer between the rockeries of a stone wall.When they see me sneaking up on them there is much giggling and hiding of faces under scrappy blankets, but I soon find out that they’re collecting ‘cabbage’. This turns out to be an assortment of paltry green-yellow leaves, weeds really, which are the only edible things that grow unassisted during the winter.We walk along a little while, and exchange names. It’s a simple interaction, and, I suppose, typical of a white person venturing into these parts. I can’t help but fall in love with Thato; she has the most sticky-out ears and painfully thin body yet carries herself with perfect grace. Eventually I walk on and they hurry back to their homes with the greens for dinner.This is the reality of Lesotho; a country landlocked by South Africa with a population of just over 2-million people, a disturbing HIV rate and a severe lack of employment opportunities. Children are skinny; the people are cold and desperate.The Basotho are a tough nation, make no mistake, but that doesn’t make having so little any easier. This is why we’re here, to hand out blankets to people who drastically need them.Supporting a worthy causeStructural engineer Kelvyn Davidson says: “My dad is a member of the Lions Club of Durban Host and I found out from him about their initiative to collect blankets for those in need this winter. I’m a member of LCCSA and I thought this would be a really worthy cause for us to support.”Davidson is one of the 5 000+ members of the LCCSA. The club has actually been around for a good while, but was formally structured in 2005. It predominantly operates with an online presence, consisting of a website and forum that collectively house one of the world’s biggest banks of information regarding absolutely anything to do with Land Cruisers.Hennie Kotze, a formidable Afrikaner who wears shirt sleeves as we huddle in our scarves and beanies, is one of the club’s volunteer custodians from Gauteng province.“A lot of the money used to buy the blankets came from club members who couldn’t make the actual trip,” he said. “It didn’t take more than a thread on the forum to get this whole thing going. That’s the beauty of the internet these days.”It also doesn’t take much to get a bunch of Land Cruiser enthusiasts on board for a trip to a place with terrible roads, a decent chance of snowfall and plenty of ice.With 100 blankets from the Lions Club of Durban Host and 274 from LCCSA, nine Land Cruisers wind their way up through the frozen dog-legs of the treacherous Sani Pass from KwaZulu-Natal into a frigid Lesotho and on to the Harvesters Hillock church in Mohkotlong.Here we’re greeted by the smiling pastor Ntate Ntsimane, and waste no time in setting out about half the blankets on a plastic tarpaulin next to the church. A crowd of children and women have been hanging around the church since 8 that morning, as they weren’t sure of our expected arrival time.“But look here,” Ntsimane says, lifting his left arm in the air and pulling down his sleeve, “This is Africa, no one wears a watch!”After the feeding scheme dishes out hot samp (made from maize kernels) and beans – which we are all offered, and want, but don’t take because it’s clear there isn’t enough – a short ceremony takes place and the blankets are handed out.Ntsimane tries to check each blanket off against his list of names before it gets too tedious, clearly wanting to make sure we know the blankets are going straight to the people for whom they’re intended.It’s a sentiment that I appreciate, as all too often in any desperate country corruption diverts 90% of goodwill into private pockets. I’m fairly certain that these thrilled kids, receiving blankets from the hands of the more privileged kids of the Land Cruiser families, are getting something they really need.Ntsimane wishes us well, and a good portion of blankets are loaded into the back of his pickup to be driven high up into the remote villages and handed out later. Before we leave he points up to the hills far in the distance and says: “That is where all these people are heading now, they have a far way to go.”My legs feel distinctly lucky as they squish up between two other taller people in the back of a 1990 Land Cruiser 62 series wagon, fondly named Maddy by her owner Warwick Chapman.Chapman’s brother Barry and his father Richard talk Land Cruiser-speak non-stop. I marvel at how much technical jargon they know, and I realise that yes, I may think Land Cruisers look cool; but that’s nowhere near enough to contribute towards to the conversation.I think my final faux pas is accidentally saying, “So how many Land Rovers are there on this trip?” This is greeted first by stunned silence and then shortly followed by a disgusted “None. But there are nine Land Cruisers.” I decide to keep quiet.Making a differenceFast-forward a few hours and I’ve already met the three little foragers from earlier in my story, and we’ve now settled into the basic accommodation at St James mission. Fires blaze inside and out, there is plenty of food and a few sneaky bottles of wine and sherry. It’s pleasant, but everyone is acutely aware of the people living in the pitch black around us. We know the huts are there, filled with families who will face the night without warm sleeping bags and nourishing mutton stew.Hennie stands up, still in shirt sleeves: “I just want to say what a wonderful trip this has been. I felt today, when we arrived at that church with our big, shiny Land Cruisers all in a row, that it might look bad, you know? We are so lucky to have what we have. But I realised as we handed out the blankets that what we were doing was really important.”Hennie’s right; yes, a big shiny Land Cruiser can be seen as a distinct division between a poor Basotho and a comparatively rich South African, but driving from all corners of South Africa to bring people something they need and can’t afford is a fine display of compassion.The temperature in the night drops to -11 ̊C, and tent dwellers wake to ripples of ice formed by the condensation of their breath. We say goodbye and split into two teams, those going out of Lesotho in the north and those heading back into KwaZulu-Natal. On the way we distribute the remainder of the blankets, stopping at villages that look worse off than others.But we begin at the village below St James, and I look around surreptitiously for my three little friends. I’m just heading back to the car when I spy Thato peering from behind a hut. I dash back to grab a blanket from a Cruiser, and Thato looks bewildered when I hand it to her.I fight the urge to bend down and hug her. Thato wouldn’t be pleased with me squeezing her; she is too distinguished for that. Staring up at me, with a look that suggests she thinks I may very well be insane, Thato smiles quizzically. She waves goodbye as we move off, the bulk of the grey blanket highlighting how slim she is. Like a wispy, winter leaf.last_img read more

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SHADO Group to invest USD10 mn in Pune factory to produce electric

first_imgSingapore: Singapore-based SHADO Group plans to invest USD 10 million (approximately Rs 70 crore) in its Pune factory to produce electric three-wheelers, the first of which will be unveiled in Bengaluru later in the day. The three-wheeler, branded as ERICK, is among the latest electric vehicle (EV) technologies based on affordable low-voltage, high-performance instantly-charged transportation mode, Saurabh Markandeya, Co-CEO and Executive Director at SHADO Group, told PTI. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscal He stated that the company plans to invest USD 10 million in its Pune factory to these electric three-wheelers, adding that it is also planning to exports to emerging economies. The group, which has its research and development centres in Singapore, Malacca and Bengaluru, is in the process of starting production of 1,000 units per month from Pune this month for India. The zero-emission three-wheeler is designed to work in urban environment, he pointed out. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boost ERICK has a range of 70-km per charge and is capable of operating at high ambient temperatures and exceeds gasoline, CNG and diesel vehicles in performance. ERICK passenger and the cargo three-wheeler models will be available in urban India and developing markets in Africa and South East Asia. The vehicles are designed and manufactured by Bengaluru-based Adarin Engineering Technologies following its merger with SHADO Group in 2017. The present fleet of EVs take too long to charge, are expensive and charging stations are few and far between, Markandeya observed. EVs need to match conventional vehicles in performance, cost and durability, as well as have the requisite charging infrastructure in place, he elaborated. SHADO group intends to partner Indian Small and medium-sized enterprises and entrepreneurs to build out a pan-India charging ecosystem that will go on to enable the widespread consumer adoption of electric vehicles, said Markandeya.last_img read more

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Solari leaves out Bale Modric ahead of Real Madrid debut

first_imgReal Madrid interim coach Santiago Solari has omitted Gareth Bale and Luka Modric ahead of his first game in charge of the senior teamFollowing Julen Lopetegui’s sacking on Monday, Real Madrid Castilla boss Solari was promoted as interim coach while the club begins their search for a permanent replacement.Due to La Liga regulations, Real have just two weeks to name Lopetegui’s successor with Antonio Conte the reported frontrunner to take over.But, for now at least, Solari’s attention will remain on the pitch with Real set to face UD Melilla in the Copa del Rey tonight.And the Argentine has made a big call by resting both Bale and Modric from the squad list on Twitter.Although Sergio Ramos, Karim Benzema and Casemiro have been included along with teenage superstar Vinicius Junior.Sergio Ramos, Real MadridZidane reveals Sergio Ramos injury concern for Real Madrid Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Zinedine Zidane has put Sergio Ramos’ availability for Real Madrid’s trip to Sevilla next weekend in doubt after withdrawing him against Levante.Under Lopetegui, Vinicius experienced just 12 minutes of action for the first-team and has spent the majority of his debut campaign playing under Solari with Castilla.The European champions will next play Real Valladolid in La Liga on Saturday at the Santiago Bernabeu.✅ ¡Nuestros convocados para el partido contra el Melilla! #RMCopa pic.twitter.com/t3Ky10wX6M— Real Madrid C.F.⚽ (@realmadrid) October 31, 2018last_img read more

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