Take the COVID-19 Broward Business Survey

first_img“We want to hear from our business owners,” said Sandy-Michael E. McDonald, OESBD Director. “Now is the time to speak up and tell us how COVID-19 has impacted your business so we can help identify additional resources to assist you.”   BROWARD COUNTY, FL – As companies around the world cope with the challenges brought by COVID-19, business owners in Broward County are gearing up to phase into reopening their doors. Are YOU Ready? View a direct message from Sandy-Michael E. McDonald, Director of the Office of Economic and Small Business Development: English | Spanish With public safety as a primary concern, the Broward County Office of Economic and Small Business Development (OESBD) is focused on supporting the local business community to ensure everyone is prepared to get back to business. OESBD is supporting the Greater Fort Lauderdale Alliance, Broward’s Public Private Partner, in asking all business owners to take a quick 9-Question Survey. For more information on OESBD programs and services, call 954-357-6400 or visit Broward.org/EconDev.last_img read more

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Proposed $40 million settlement set for players

first_imgEd O’Bannon, a former UCLA basketball player, was the driving force behind filing the initial lawsuit. (Isaac Brekken/AP Photo/File)A $40 million settlement has been completed that will pay college football and basketball players dating to 2003 for the use of their likenesses in NCAA-branded videogames.The payouts could go to more than 100,000 athletes, including some current players, who were either on college rosters or had their images used in videogames made by Electronic Arts featuring college teams. Lawyers for the plaintiffs say it would be the first time college athletes will be paid for the commercial use of their images.Depending on how many athletes apply for the settlement, the payments could range from as little as $48 for each year an athlete was on a roster to $951 for each year the image of an athlete was used in a videogame.“We’re incredibly pleased with the results of this settlement and the opportunity to right a huge wrong enacted by the NCAA and EA against these players and their rights of publicity,” said Steve Berman, one of the lead attorneys in the case. “We’ve fought against intense legal hurdles since filing this case in 2009 and to see this case come to fruition is a certain victory.”The settlement is with Electronic Arts and Collegiate Licensing Co., which licenses and markets college sports, and does not include the NCAA. The case against the NCAA is scheduled for trial early next year.Plaintiffs in the case, which dates to 2009, contend the NCAA conspired with Electronic Arts and Collegiate Licensing Co. to illegally use their images in videogames.U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken still must approve the proposed settlement, which comes on the eve of a major antitrust trial against the NCAA that could reshape the way college sports operate. That case, featuring former UCLA basketball star Ed O’Bannon and others as lead plaintiffs, goes to trial June 9 in Oakland, California.According to documents filed with the court late Friday, attorneys for O’Bannon and 20 other plaintiffs say they have already run up legal fees exceeding $30 million and expenses of more than $4 million in pressing their case. They are seeking an injunction that would stop the NCAA from enforcing rules that prohibit athletes from profiting from their play in college.O’Bannon, who led UCLA to a national title in 1995, is also part of the group settling with EA Sports and Collegiate Licensing Co. Also covered by the settlement are suits brought by former Arizona State quarterback Sam Keller, former West Virginia football player Shawne Alston and former Rutgers player Ryan Hart.According to the filing, a pool of money will be available to players after attorneys take 33 percent of the proposed settlement and up to $2.5 million in expenses. Named plaintiffs like O’Bannon and Keller will receive $15,000, while others who joined the suit later would get $2,500 or $5,000.The majority of the money, however, will go to athletes who file for claims, a group that attorneys say could contain between 140,000 and 200,000 players who were on football and basketball rosters from 2003 on. The final payouts will depend on how many of those athletes file claims in the class-action case.EA Sports announced last year it would stop making the long-running NCAA football videogame series because of the litigation and other issues in securing licensing rights.last_img read more

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Ballet Northwest Presents The Nutcracker

first_imgFacebook94Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Ballet NorthwestPhoto: Courtesy of Ballet Northwest and Jerome TsoBallet Northwest is proud to debut a brand-new Act I set for their annual presentation of Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker. Over 200 dancers will grace the stage this year as audiences experience the timeless holiday tale in a whole new way.Set designer Jill Carter and Co-Artistic Directors Ken and Josie Johnson have been working since last spring on the new set, which shows the interior of the Silberhaus home on the eve of their Christmas party. Technological advances in stage design and lighting will make the set to appear to grow when Clara joins the Nutcracker and toy soldiers in battle against the Mouse King.200 people make up the cast, which features local dancers as young as eight years old as well as Ballet Northwest company dancers. Ballet Northwest’s dance company is comprised of over 70 dancers age 12 and older, primarily from the South Puget Sound area. Guest dancer Iyun Harrison joins the production as the Nutcracker Prince. Mr. Harrison danced professionally with Dance Theater of Harlem and Ailey II, both in New York City. Currently he is on faculty at Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle, and locally at Johansen Olympia Dance Center. He is also the Artistic Director of Ashani Dances in Seattle.The production is choreographed by Ballet Northwest’s Artistic Directors Ken and Josie Johnson and is sponsored by The Olympian, Dr. Andrew Kapust, DDS, Kell-Chuck Glass, and Mixx 96.1 FM.Co-Artistic Director Josie Johnson states, “We’re thrilled to be debuting this amazing new set, which will make the production even more magical.”Her husband and Co-Artistic Director Ken Johnson adds, “The talent this year is greater than ever, so much so that we’ve triple cast all of the soloist parts so the dancers rotate through different parts, like most professional companies.”Plot Synopsis and HistoryDuring a family Christmas party, the mysterious Herr Drosselmeyer gives Clara a wooden Nutcracker in the shape of a soldier dressed in parade uniform. When her brother Fritz grabs for the toy it breaks. Crushed, Clara nurses the Nutcracker with Herr Drosselmeyer’s help. After the party, Clara visits her Nutcracker in the great room and falls asleep on the sofa. At midnight, she awakens to find herself shrunk to the size of the toys under the tree. An army of mice corner her and the Nutcracker springs to life. He, Clara, and a host of Toy Soldiers defeat the Mouse King and his army. The Nutcracker is revealed to be a prince, finally freed from the Mouse King’s magic. To thank her for breaking the spell that bound him inside the nutcracker, the Prince takes Clara to the Land of Sweets, where The Sugar Plum Fairy and her people dance to celebrate the Prince’s return.The Nutcracker is a fairy-tale ballet based on the L’Histoire d’un Casse Noisette (The Story of the Hazelnut-Cracker) by Dumas Père, which is itself based on The Nutcracker and the Mouse King by E.T.A. Hoffmann. Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky wrote the score for the ballet, which premiered on December 17, 1892 at the Maryinsky Theater in St. Petersburg with the Imperial Russian Ballet. Though The Nutcracker was performed in Russia for many years, it was not performed in its entirety in the US until December 29, 1944 by the San Francisco Opera Ballet, where it became an annual holiday tradition. For 10 years, they were the only company in the country to perform it until the New York City Ballet staged a production with George Balanchine’s choreography on February 2, 1954. It wasn’t long before the ballet secured its place in American tradition. Balanchine’s choreography has become the most emulated in the world.BiographiesJosie Johnson, Co-Artistic Director –  Josie and her husband Ken are the Directors of Johansen Olympia Dance Center. She trained at Orange County Ballet Theatre, Central Pennsylvania Youth Ballet, and The Hartt School at the University of Hartford, where she received a B.F.A. in Dance Pedagogy. Josie danced professionally with Dance Connecticut/Hartford Ballet, Connecticut Opera, Roxey Ballet, and ARC Dance Productions. Guest credits include Eliot Feld’s Mr. XYZ with Mikhail Baryshnikov and Kirk Peterson’s The Nutcracker with the American Ballet Theatre Studio Company. Josie has taught and choreographed extensively throughout New Jersey and Connecticut, and locally at Washington Contemporary Ballet, Evergreen City Ballet, ARC Dance Productions, and Saint Martin’s University. She is an American Ballet Theatre National Training Curriculum certified teacher.Ken Johnson, Co-Artistic Director – Ken and his wife Josie are the Directors of Johansen Olympia Dance Center. He trained at Johansen School of Ballet, Evergreen City Ballet, and the School of Hartford Ballet. He attended summer programs at American Ballet Theatre, Houston Ballet, Pennsylvania Ballet, and Pacific Northwest Ballet on scholarship. Ken danced professionally with Hartford Ballet, Dance Connecticut, and Connecticut Opera, as well as at the prestigious Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival. Following his retirement from performing, Ken received a bachelor’s from The Hartt School at the University of Hartford. In addition to teaching dance, Ken has worked at American Repertory Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, Dance Connecticut, ACT Theatre, and Tacoma Art Museum. He is an American Ballet Theatre National Training Curriculum certified teacher.Since 1970, Ballet Northwest has been a community-based group dedicated to promoting, teaching, and preserving the art of dance in Southwestern Washington. The company offers educational opportunities for local dancers as well as outreach throughout the community.Details:  Performances scheduled at  7:30pm on Dec. 13, 14, 22, and 21;  2pm on Dec 14, 15, 21 and 22, 2013. All performances held at The Washington Center for the Performing Arts, 512 Washington St SE Olympia, WA 98501.  Purchase tickets by calling 360-753-8586 or order online at www.olytix.org.  Tickets are $14 to$30, plus $3.00 service fee. Student, senior, and youth discounts available.last_img read more

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