Limerick pensioner named World’s oldest Ice-Mile swimmer after completing “extreme” challenge…

first_imgLinkedin Print Email TAGSKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick Post Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener LimerickNewsLimerick pensioner named World’s oldest Ice-Mile swimmer after completing “extreme” challenge in River ShannonBy David Raleigh – February 22, 2021 1130 WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash center_img Advertisement Previous articleOpinion: “Sustainability” Needs To Be More Than A Buzzword For Treaty United to SucceedNext articleLimerick contact tracers “encountering challenges” from people “not answering phones” and “not disclosing how they may have got virus” David Raleigh Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Facebook Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limerick Twitter WhatsApp Limerick Ice swimmers Alan Gleeson,53(blue cap) and Harry Harbison(63) swim in the icy cold Shannon waters at the Mill road in Limerick.Photograph Liam Burke/Press 22A Limerick pensioner who occupied himself during the lockdown, by swimming in the River Shannon, has become the world’s oldest Ice-Mile swimmer.Ger Purcell, 66, from Limerick, trained over winter within 5km from his home, in line with public health restrictions, before completing the challenge in freezing conditions in just over 43 minutes.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Guinness World Records has confirmed that Mr Purcell, of the Limerick Narwhales club, became the oldest male athlete to complete an ice-mile under international ice swimming association regulations, when he swam a mile, without stopping, in 4.93 degrees celsius water, three weeks ago.“During the summer I swim across the bay in Kilkee everyday, so my friends said I should have a go at the ice-mile swim, and I said to them, ‘do I look mad enough to swim through the winter in ice cold weather’,” said Mr Purcell.“Then the lockdown happened and basically I kept swimming, the weather started to go downhill over November, December, January, but I kept going; It was something to keep me occupied over lockdown too.”“The biggest problem I had was getting swims in during the lockdown, but I managed it within the 5km because the River Shannon is situated near where I live.”The grandfather, from Richmond Park, Corbally, who is also a member of St Michael’s Rowing Club, said he nearly didn’t finish the challenge due to the “extreme conditions”.“I was doing very well but then in the last 400 metres, I struggled. As I went around the buoy  I kind of swung off it because I was getting a bit tired, and the sun was beating down on my face, and I looked up and my eyes hit the sun and I took a mouthful of water.”“It was cold and I got a bit disorientated, and I was trying to get my level right, to get to the next buoy, which I couldn’t see because of the sun, so the last 200 metres were fairly tough.”Despite the cold temperatures Mr Purcell kept to the ice-mile regulations which only allow competitors to wear swimming togs, a swimming cap, and goggles.“The water was 4.9 degrees and I couldn’t wear anything else, no Vaseline or anything else, so you’re bare. My recovery took about two hours, I had to have someone else with me to get me out of the water, because my feet and hands were like ice blocks.”“You can’t get dressed because you can’t feel your hands to get dressed, so you need to get warmed straight away. I’m told that in other parts of the world where it has been done that they go to a jacuzzi and steam room afterwards, but basically I was just getting dressed in my car.”Mr Purcell, who has three grown up children and seven grandchildren, has “always been into sport” and “challenging myself”.“I’ve done a couple of triathlons but I damaged my ankle so I need an operation on that, but I still do a bit of cycling.”“My son thinks I’m mad, but now I can say I’m the oldest ice swimmer in town.”The previous oldest ice mile swimmer was a 64 year old man.Mr Purcell said he won’t be doing the ice-mile challenge again, but he now campaigning for Limerick City and County Council to redevelop existing swimming baths in Corbally in order to attract international ice mile swimmers to Limerick.“We have the most ice milers in the world at the Limerick Narwhales club and we are really building up the ice miles especially among the younger guys. We need a place and there is talks about the council developing the Corbally baths this year.”“It would be brilliant, because you could bring international swimmers into Limerick and have international events there.”last_img read more

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Swarbrick recounts atmosphere during accident

first_imgDirector of Athletics Jack Swarbrick entered the football practice field at about 4:47 p.m. Wednesday, and witnessed two completed passes. He said practice seemed normal, until he felt a powerful gust of wind, and saw objects that had formerly been stationary fly past him. “It was an unremarkable journey in the sense that practice was normal and plays were being conducted with no difficulty,” he said. Shortly after, Swarbrick felt the wind speed up and heard a crash. He described the minutes preceding Declan Sullivan’s death from his perspective in a press conference Thursday, where he told reporters the University is launching a full investigation into the video tower accident that caused the Notre Dame junior’s death. Swarbrick declined to answer questions about the possible effect of the day’s weather conditions on the accident until the investigation is completed. Winds reportedly reached 50 miles per hour when Sullivan, who was videotaping the football practice for the University, was on the scissor lift that collapsed. “There is a lot to learn here, and we will learn it all,” he said. “I know there’s a lot of speculation about what may or may not have happened, but that’s what the investigation is for.” Swarbrick also declined to comment on which channels of authority authorized an outdoor practice and who was responsible for clearing the videographers to tape practice from the tower. “It’s not one decision. There are multiple decisions made,” he said. “It’s not a decision to go outside. It’s a host of decisions relevant to ‘Do you go outside?’” The Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) and a contracted accident reconstruction team are investigating the accident. The Indiana Occupational Safety and Health Administration (IOSHA) also launched an investigation. The state investigates all workplace fatalities, an IOSHA official said. As Swarbrick walked through the north end of the west field of the LaBar Practice Complex, he said he saw items like towels and Gatorade containers fly by him. Officials estimate the tower fell about 4:51 p.m., he said. “I noticed the netting on the goal posts start to bend dramatically and heard a crash,” Swarbrick said. “At first, I couldn’t orient the location of the crash.” Emergency personnel responded quickly following the collapse of the tower, Swarbrick said. NDSP responded in three minutes, followed by the Notre Dame Fire Department and a city ambulance. Swarbrick and head football coach Brian Kelly told players and staff members to leave the accident scene. “Coach Kelly remained with me by Declan until the ambulance attendant had Declan up on a lift,” Swarbrick said. Before the ambulance reached the hospital, Sullivan was no longer breathing on his own, he said. Sullivan’s parents and younger brother came to campus Wednesday evening. His sister is a freshman at the University. Vice President for Student Affairs Fr. Tom Doyle spent the evening with the family. During the press conference, University President Fr. John Jenkins said Sullivan was bright, energetic and dedicated. “There is no greater sadness for a university community than the death of one of the students. There is certainly no greater sadness for a family than the loss of a son or brother,” Jenkins said. “It is with the sense of that double sadness that on behalf of the whole University, I want to express our deepest condolences.” Swarbrick said the investigation into Sullivan’s death began immediately. In response to questions about practicing in the weather conditions and allowing the videographers to use the towers, he said each individual sports program makes its own decisions about how practice will proceed. Investigators will examine the decisions made about that specific practice leading up to the accident, he said. Swarbrick said no information will be released until the investigation is complete. He said he expects the practice field will be restored by this weekend. At least one other videographer was on a tower taping practice Wednesday. Swarbrick said he has witnessed past practices in which the video towers were not used, possibly because of weather concerns, most likely, lightning, he said. The videographers are part of the broader football administration team, and they report to a video coordinator. “We’ll let the investigation thoroughly and completely run its course. And then we’ll have the ability to really understand what happened, to learn from it and to move forward from it,” Swarbrick said.last_img read more

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Government set to operate sections of toll roads in Aceh, Manado amid pandemic

first_imgPublic Works and Public Housing Minister Basuki Hadimuljono has approved the operation of 35 kilometers of two strategic toll roads, namely the Banda Aceh-Sigli in Aceh and the Manado-Bitung in North Sulawesi, to boost economic recovery amid the COVID-19 pandemic.In Aceh, a 14-km section has been opened connecting Indrapuri and Blang Bintang, where Sultan Iskandar Muda International Airport is located. Meanwhile, two toll road sections in North Sulawesi, spanning 21 km, which will connect Manado, Airmadidi, and a part of Kauditan, are also set to operate soon.“The toll roads connecting productive regions will reduce logistics costs and improve the competitiveness of local products. They will also boost regional economic growth and establish new economic centers,” Basuki said in a statement released on Sunday. COVID-19 restrictions, which are now being phased out in some places, have caused logistical disruptions along the supply chain by limiting mobility. Meanwhile, the economy grew 2.97 percent in the first quarter of this year, the lowest in 19 years.However, the government is committed to continuing the development of strategic national projects during the COVID-19 health crisis with the addition of 89 projects with an estimated investment value of Rp 1.42 quadrillion (US$96.8 billion).Coordinating Economic Affairs Minister Airlangga Hartarto stated recently that the new projects were an addition to the existing 223 strategic national projects and were expected to employ about 4 million additional workers each year from 2020 to 2024.The Banda Aceh-Sigli toll road, stretching for 74 km in total, is the first-ever toll road in Aceh. Construction started in 2018 by state-owned construction firm Hutama Karya. The investment in the project, with a total of six road sections, is estimated at Rp 12.35 trillion, with a construction cost of Rp 9 trillion.It is expected to cut the journey between provincial capital Banda Aceh and Sigli to one hour from the previous three hours.Meanwhile, the 46-km Manado-Bitung toll road is estimated to cost Rp 6.19 trillion. The government is set to build the first section, while the second section will be constructed using a public-private partnership (PPP) scheme with PT Jasa Marga Manado Bitung.The toll road will provide a boost for the region’s tourism, especially the Manado-Bitung-Likupang area, which has been listed as one of the five priority tourism areas to be developed this year.Topics :last_img read more

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