Won’t Close Check-Posts At Kerala Border, Karnataka Govt Tells High Court

first_imgTop StoriesWon’t Close Check-Posts At Kerala Border, Karnataka Govt Tells High Court LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK30 March 2021 8:24 AMShare This – xThe Karnataka Government on Tuesday told the Karnataka High Court that the directive of the Deputy Commissioner of Dakshina Kannada district to close rarely used check-posts at Kerala border will not be acted upon.Additional Government Advocate also informed the court that Clause 3 of the directive issued on March 15, will be reconsidered. Based on the submissions of the Government Advocate,…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Karnataka Government on Tuesday told the Karnataka High Court that the directive of the Deputy Commissioner of Dakshina Kannada district to close rarely used check-posts at Kerala border will not be acted upon.Additional Government Advocate also informed the court that Clause 3 of the directive issued on March 15, will be reconsidered. Based on the submissions of the Government Advocate, a bench headed by the Chief Justices Abhay S Oka recorded in its order that “AGA on instructions states that clause 3 of the proceedings will not be acted upon.”Clause 3 of the directive states :  “In consideration of the situation, every gram panchayat,/urban local bodies/municipality/town municipality, shall identify the points of the arrival in their respective jurisdiction to facilitate the public/student opening of the checkpost which are more likely to be used and closing of check post which are rarely used such decision must be taken and directions issued for arrivals from Kerala/Maharashtra state by Panchayat Task force committee which is already in existence.” On the previous hearing the court had taken exception to the directives, purportedly issued to control the surge of COVID-19 cases: “The modified order passed by the Deputy Commissioner of Dakshina Kannada on March 15, is misconceived and issued in complete non-application of mind. This gives arbitrary power to local authorities to close any check post and open any check post anywhere. This authorizes them to close the check post. It is worse then the earlier order, at least earlier there was clarity on which check posts were open”, CJ Oka had orally remarked. Today, Advocate K Ravishankar appearing for the petitioner B Subbaya Rai, who challenges the border restrictions, brought to the notice of the court of the latest guidelines issued by the Union Government dated March 23, by which there is no restriction imposed on inter-and intra-state travel. Advocate M N Kumar appearing for the central government affirmed the same by saying “No border restrictions has been imposed in the latest guidelines.” Following this, the court orally said “There is a concept of Federalism, you cannot simply close borders.” The bench even suggested to the state government to make a statement before the court that all the checkpost across the Kerala-Karnataka border are open and checking of RT-PCR reports of persons entering from Kerala can be done. The court accordingly adjourned the matter for further hearing on April 1. The Deputy Commissioner passed the modified order after the Court rapped the State Government for imposing travel restrictions in violation of the Central Government’s ‘unlock’ guidelines which prohibit curbs on inter-state travel.Terming the modified order “worse than the previous order”, the bench had said on the previous hearing :”Look at the consequences, at least in the original order four checkpoints were open. By virtue of clause 3, at the 11th hour someone will be told the route is closed, because for the last three days no person has used it so we closed it, so the person will have to take a different route. Will it not directly affect those people who are entering Kerala from Karnataka and coming back?”.The Court also commented that the border restrictions did not make any sense as there was no curbs on air travel from the neighbouring state.”Flights from Kerala operate to Karnataka without restrictions. So, if you have money you can enter the state of Karnataka without restrictions but if you can’t afford to buy an air ticket you will be subjected to all these restrictions. How this can be tolerated?”, the bench had asked the government’s counsel.Last year, the Kerala High Court had interfered with the blockade imposed by Karnataka Government on the Kerala border. Acting on a PIL filed by the Kerala High Court Advocates Association, the Kerala High Court directed the Union Government to open the highway for travel. The High Court noted that the travel restrictions had infringed the right to health of border residents, who were relying on hospitals in Mangalore for treatment.When Karnataka appealed to the Supreme Court, the SC suggested a dialogue between the Chief Secretaries of both the states. Following talks, the restrictions were lifted.   Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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Northern California special education teacher faces allegations of allowing a fight club in his classroom

first_imgiStock/Ridofranz(CLOVERDALE, Calif.) —  A California special education teacher is facing multiple charges for allegedly creating and refereeing a “fight club” inside his classroom, according to a statement released by the Cloverdale Police Department.On March 7, police officials were informed by Cloverdale High School administrators that Federico Vargas was using his classroom to secretly have students fight each other, said Sergeant Chris Parker in a statements released on March 10.“The fights occurred on multiple occasions over a period of time not yet determined, but isolated to Vargas’ classroom,” said Sgt. Parker. “Multiple student injuries were reported during the investigation, one of which required medical attention as a result of the fighting.”One of the fights refereed by Vargas was captured on a student’s cellphone, according to the statement.It’s unclear if all the minors involved are special education students, said Jeremy Decker, the Cloverdale School District’s superintendent. “But, we haven’t completed the investigation yet,” said Decker.Vargas, 41, who taught for the Cloverdale School District for eight years, was arrested on March 9 and charged with 13 counts of contributing to the delinquency of minors and five counts of endangering children, according to the statement.Vargas is out on bail, Sgt. Parker told ABC News in an email on Thursday.The police’s investigation is still ongoing.Attempts by ABC News to reach Vargas by phone were unsuccessful. It’s unclear if Vargas was assigned an attorney as of Friday.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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