Malabo correspondent of AFP and RFI completes 100 days in city jail

first_img Reports News Organisation Reporters Without Borders reiterates its call for the release of Rodrigo Angue Nguema, the Malabo correspondent of Agence France-Presse and Radio France Internationale, who has been held in the capital’s Black Beach prison for the past 100 days. He was tried on a defamation charge on 1 September but the court has yet to issue a verdict.“Held for three months in pre-trial detention and another three weeks since his trial, Nguema still does not know his fate,” Reporters Without Borders said. “This long wait is incomprehensible. Imprisonment is a disproportionate punishment for defamation and we urge the authorities to amend the legislation that allows this.”The prosecutor’s office did not present charges against Nguema when he appeared at a public hearing in Malabo on 1 September in connection with the defamation action brought against him by the head of the national airline Ceiba, Mamadou Jaye, on 17 June. The court deferred its verdict.The only journalist in Equatorial Guinea working as a correspondent for international news organisations, Nguema was sued by Jaye over a report that he had embezzled 3.5 billion CFA francs (5 million euros) and skipped the country in April.Nguema got his information from rumours circulating online, which he thought he had confirmed by talking to local sources, above all at Malabo airport. The story turned out to be wrong and he quickly admitted his mistake.When a Reporters Without Borders delegation was received in Paris by the ambassador of Equatorial Guinea, Federico Edjo Ovono, on 18 September, the organisation said it would like to visit the country soon. RSF_en News Not even coronavirus escapes Equatorial Guinea’s extreme censorship June 15, 2020 Find out more Receive email alerts The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa to go furthercenter_img News September 25, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Malabo correspondent of AFP and RFI completes 100 days in city jail Coronavirus “information heroes” – journalism that saves lives November 27, 2020 Find out more Equatorial GuineaAfrica Follow the news on Equatorial Guinea Equatorial GuineaAfrica May 18, 2020 Find out more Help by sharing this information last_img read more

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Mom recalls the ‘absolute fear’ of watching daughter, 5, dangle from a ski lift

first_imgABCNews.com(BIG BEAR LAKE, Calif.) — The parents of the young girl who was seen in harrowing video earlier this week dangling from a ski lift described the “absolute fear” they felt as they watched their daughter suspend from the lift.In video captured by a fellow skier, Sara, 5, can be seen dangling from a ski lift in Big Bear Lake, California, as her ski instructor holds onto her by her hood. Below them, a crowd scrambles to set up a tarp to catch her.Sara’s parents, Arman and Sidney, who ABC News agreed to only identify by their first names, say they were also on the slopes that day, and Sidney was riding only a few chairs ahead of her daughter in the lift when the incident occurred.Sidney recalls that she “kept hearing commotion and yelling and screaming.”“I turned around and I was scanning the crowd and I saw Sara dangling from the chair,” she said. “I started screaming, ‘That’s my daughter, that’s my daughter.’”The mother added that in that moment she felt “absolute fear.”“There she is dangling from a chair and it’s so high up and it’s … it was horrible,” she added.Sara survived the incident sustaining only bruising, but her parents say that a first responder said their daughter became unconscious at one point, and they argue that the resort has not been forthcoming with the facts of the incident.Sidney says she feels they “deserve to know what happened, and right now they haven’t told us.”Big Bear Mountain Resort told ABC News in a statement that it is addressing all of the family’s requests for information surrounding the incident. The resort also lauded the quick-thinking actions of the ski instructor and said it takes “safety seriously.”“With respect to the facts, the lift came to a complete stop within 15 seconds of leaving the terminal. The ski instructor riding the lift with Sara did a remarkable job – [Her father] has referred to her as a ‘hero.’ Guests and ski patrol were on scene immediately, and together facilitated a rescue within approximately two minutes of the beginning of the incident,” the statement reads. “We are truly sorry our response to the family’s concerns, after the incident, fell short. We will continue to communicate with the family and be of service to them. Bear Mountain takes guest safety seriously, and we are thankful Sara was not more seriously injured.”The National Ski Areas Association says that riding a ski lift is safer than riding an elevator. To stay safe while on riding a lift, experts advise to ask an attendant for help, always remove and carry packs, and do not use your cell phone while loading or unloading.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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The State of Play: American society should not strive to be just like Mike

first_imgDespite the rampant chaos and dysfunction that’s likely ensued since I left my throne as Daily Trojan sports editor, some positives still remain — one of them being the abundance of time that I have now, which leads me to the topic of today’s column: “The Last Dance.”  For those of you who haven’t logged on to any form of social media in the past month, “The Last Dance” is a 10-part ESPN docuseries that chronicles the final season of Michael Jordan’s tenure with the Chicago Bulls. I binged every single episode recently and it was an honest-to-God masterpiece. First, calm down. I am aware that Michael Jordan is one of the greatest competitors in the history of sports. I would encourage any inspired American to try to reach the same heights that Michael did during his career.   C’mon, do you really think we’d be better off as a society if we all tried to be like Mike? However, the more I read about Michael after watching the series’ last episode, the more I realized that I was wrong. Michael Jordan was a badass, yes, but what “The Last Dance” fails to honestly explore is the fact that Michael, by many accounts, was a tyrannical bully. Many have analyzed Michael’s leadership style and come to various conclusions, one of them being that Michael suppressed his humanity and behaved this way to lift his team to greatness.  In fact, if anyone got even remotely close to six NBA Finals MVPs and 10 scoring titles, I’d buy their bobblehead, dedicate a shrine to it and shed all of my worldly possessions to worship their athletic greatness.  And in exercising his editorial control, Michael made sure he had the last word in the documentary.  “When people see this, they’re going to say, ‘Well, he wasn’t really a nice guy; he may have been a tyrant,’” MJ says right before the documentary ends. “Well, that’s you because you never won anything.” That may be true. Michael does demonstrate some vulnerability in “The Last Dance,” nearly reaching the point of tears when discussing his harsh leadership style and obsession with winning. Stuart Carson is a rising senior writing about the intersection of sports, politics and American society. His column, “The State of Play,” runs every other Wednesday. Listen, I know sports is often the domain of testosterone-fueled egos, but you shouldn’t have to defend yourself against a sucker punch to mend a relationship with a co-worker.  I’ve said it a thousand times — sports is a medium through which we spread and teach values. In an equally significant way, sports is also the most influential education on masculinity children receive as they grow up.  Yes, Michael was a six-time NBA champion and the best player of all time. By the end of “The Last Dance,” that reality had already been successfully instilled into the nether regions of my consciousness. The documentary captured how great Michael truly was and sent one message clearly: Michael Jordan was an absolute badass.  I’m not saying that the documentary completely ignored some of Michael’s less savory qualities. In episode eight, an incident where Michael punched his teammate, Steve Kerr, in the face is described and recounted by both of the brawl’s participants.  It should be noted that for all the attention the documentary pays to Jordan’s athletic accomplishments, little is paid to how his personality affected his own personal relationships or to how some teammates felt like they played for, not with, Michael. Considering Michael had editorial control over the series, this is not surprising.  If America embraced the Michael Jordan that is presented in “The Last Dance,” our society would be in shambles. The American family would crumble underneath everyone’s no-holds-barred, winner-take-all pursuit of success and children would claw and gauge each other’s eyes out at youth basketball games.  And Michael’s fight with Kerr wasn’t just a singular dick move but part of a recurring pattern of dick moves made over the course of Michael’s career.  I don’t discount the possibility that Michael did what he felt he had to do, but even if it’s true, we are still led to the same conclusion: His brutal leadership style and win-at-all-costs approach to basketball shouldn’t be the model we aspire toward.  Immediately after watching the series, even I, a lifelong Lakers fan, had been fully converted — more than anything, I wanted to be like Mike. Not like Kobe, Shaq or Kareem — but Mike.  Rather than characterizing the event as what it was — a dick move — the documentary presents the incident at practice as a positive development in Michael and Kerr’s relationship. Often, the focus of this column is American politics. Today, however, we’re gonna shift the focus to American society, and American society should not strive to be like Mike. More specifically, American society should not strive to be like the Mike that “The Last Dance” portrays.  Along with Kerr, Michael also punched teammate Will Perdue at practice. This instance goes along with other dick moves such as Michael repeatedly deriding Bulls captain Bill Cartwright and mocking Bulls general manager Jerry Krause for his height and weight. In the documentary, this behavior is either excused, ignored or characterized as the traits of a champion. last_img read more

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76ers G Zhaire Smith recalled from G League, could make NBA debut Tuesday

first_imgBrown said he didn’t expect Smith to play for Philadelphia in 2018-19 at the time, but it appears his recovery has gone well.Brett Brown doesn’t expect @zhaire_smith to play for the #Sixers this season. The hope is for him to play some games for the @blue_coats.— Keith Pompey (@PompeyOnSixers) February 20, 2019Smith, 19, averaged 5 points, 2.8 rebounds and 1.5 assists in four games with the Blue Coats.The 76ers enter Tuesday at 42-25 and are third in the Eastern Conference. They will tip off against Cleveland at 7 p.m. ET. Zhaire Smith could be preparing for his NBA debut.The 76ers guard has been recalled from Philadelphia’s G League affiliate, the Delaware Blue Coats, where he made his debut in February. He will be active for the 76ers’ game against the Cavaliers on Tuesday. The team has recalled @zhaire_smith from @blue_coats. He will be available for tonight’s game vs. Cleveland.— Philadelphia 76ers (@sixers) March 12, 2019Head coach Brett Brown told reporters Smith is available and will almost certainly play in the fourth quarter.Zhaire Smith is available tonight and he’ll almost certainly play in the 4th. Sixers should be up huge at home over an awful Cavs team that played last night. Perfect time to make your debut! pic.twitter.com/Y7NDqOLZy3— Andrew Porter (@And_Porter) March 12, 2019Philadelphia selected Smith with the 16th pick in the 2018 draft. But he suffered a foot fracture during the summer which required surgery.Smith was expected to be back on the court in December, but his return was delayed because of serious complications from an allergic reaction, which cause him to lose “upward of 20 pounds,” according to a report from The Ringer.last_img read more

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A Unique Valentine’s Day Experience! Silent Movie: ‘Lucky Star’ With World-Class…

first_imgFacebook6Tweet0Pin0Curated by the incomparable world-class theater organist Dennis James, the Center’s Silent Movie Series bring to life the golden age of cinema. A treat for the eyes and ears, each movie shines with live music played on an Olympia treasure from 1924, the Mighty Andy Crow Wurlitzer Organ.“Lucky Star” is a powerful romance starring Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell, known as “America’s Favorite Lovebirds.”  Make your Valentine’s Day a unique experience to remember!Tickets are on-sale now!DATE: Friday, February 14TIME: 7:30 pmVENUE: Washington Center Main Stage, 512 Washington St. SECOST: Tickets: $23 | General AdmissionFor more information about upcoming events please visit www.washingtoncenter.org or call the Box Office at 360-753-8586.last_img

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