Personnel Today’s 2002 Review

first_imgIthas been a challenging year for HR, with a growing amount of red tape, a needto improve the bottom line in a tough economic market, and a number ofhigh-profile strikes. Personnel Today looks back at the yearAgencyWorkers DirectiveHRhad to watch while the draft Agency Workers Directive became tougher onemployers as the year progressed.TheEuropean Commission directive proposed to give agency workers the same pay andconditions as permanent employees. Agency staff would be entitled to the samesalaries, work and rest periods, paid holidays, overtime pay and health andsafety rights.Asfar back as March, UK HR argued that this would raise employers’ costs and tiethem up in red tape.TheCommission originally proposed the entitlements should come into force aftersix weeks of employment, but many in Europe – including MEP Ieke van den Burg –were in favour of immediate rights.InOctober, 71 per cent of the 1,000 organisations surveyed by Personnel Today andManpower said that their business would suffer if the EU Agency WorkersDirective was introduced. Almost half predicted that it would damage thecompetitiveness of the UK economy.HRprofessionals were angry that rights could be granted from the very start ofthe temporary worker’s employment.Lastmonth, the European Parliament granted a transitional five-year period for theUK and Ireland to make use of the six-week exemption – but only in respect ofpay, not any other terms and conditions, and stated that adequate pay must beprovided from day one. Dataprotection and internet monitoringHRprofessionals were left hanging on a string by confusing and delayed dataprotection guidance, while internet misuse and problems with new technologycontinued to escalate.TheInformation Commission drip-fed its guidance on The Data Protection Act 1998,which outlined employers’ responsibilities when handling staff information.InJuly, a Personnel Today and Websense survey revealed that one in four companieshad sacked staff for internet abuse, with 43 per cent of firms experiencing webabuse every month.Twomonths later another study, by Personnel Today and KLegal, showed that e-mailand internet abuse by staff has become the biggest disciplinary problem foremployers. It is now the most common disciplinary offence – with moreincidences than dishonesty, violence and health and safety breaches combined.TheInformation Commission released the first two of four codes – on recruitment andemployee records – but they were said to be confusing.Thefinal two codes, on monitoring and medical records, have been delayed until thenew information commissioner Richard Thomas takes over the position this month.However,new plans by the European Commission to give staff more rights to privacy atwork could confuse the situation even further.Lastmonth the EC announced it had started a second consultation for legislation onemployment-based data protection, which could introduce more safeguards toprotect staff rights. WorkingTime DirectiveECmoves to end the UK’s 48-hour opt-out following a review of the Working TimeDirective has many employers worried.TheWorking Time Regulations, based on a 1993 EU directive, have always givenemployers and staff in the UK the right to opt out of the 48-hour week.Currently,40 per cent of large organisations in the UK ask staff to sign the opt-out. Butthe EC could scrap the opt-out by the end of next year, hitting many sectors –particularly construction, catering, and the NHS – hard.Inlate November, Personnel Today teamed up with the Employment LawyersAssociation to help the EC survey the views of UK organisations.TheEuropean Commissioner responsible, Fernando Pereira, wants to find out howlosing the opt-out will damage business and how it would tackle the long-hoursculture.Employmentrelations minister Alan Johnson, said the UK must pick up the fight: “Wethink the opt-out is good. It is a good balance for individuals to have theright to work more than 48 hours, but not be forced to do so,” he said.MeasuringHRis taking steps towards measuring its own worth, the worth of people, andfighting for a strategic role on the board.However,there is still some way to go with a survey of 300 HR directors showing that 52per cent think they have a limited influence on the board’s decision-makingprocess. Just 21 per cent think they influence to a large extent, 19 per centthink they ‘definitely’ do.InSeptember, a Personnel Today  andDeloitte & Touche study showed that HR is being held back by its inabilityto measure human capital. While many HR professionals say they usebenchmarking, metrics and balanced scorecards, only four in 10 users believethese methods are successful.Commentatorssay that most companies are struggling to measure the worth of their peoplebecause human capital is such a complicated asset to value. But, they predict,human asset accounting will be-come a standard benchmark in annual reports, andthis will create a powerful argument for HR to be included as a key strategicplayer.Withthis in mind, we launched our series Delivering HR Strategy, which is offeringpractical guidance on how HR can offer more value.IndustrialactionWhileunions and statistics insist that we are not headed for another ‘Winter ofDiscontent’, the profile of strikes soars. However,of firefighters, local government workers, teachers, rail workers, theatreworkers, tube drivers, airport staff, benefit office workers, British Librarystaff, gallery attendants, and carmakers all walked out in protests this year.Despiteall of this, TUC employment rights expert Sarah Veale told the CIPD conferencethat the media was overstating the employment relations problem.Figuresshow that in the 12 months to July, 1.1 million days were lost through strikeaction. In comparison, however, 29.1 million days were lost in 1979. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Personnel Today’s 2002 ReviewOn 10 Dec 2002 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Wish you were here? Movebubble inks deal for EcoWorld site

first_imgLettings app Movebubble has signed a deal with sustainable developer EcoWorld to market build-to-rent homes on a site where Pink Floyd records were once made.Be:here Hayes is the first development from EcoWorld that will feature on Movebubble.The complex is part of the Old Vinyl Factory redevelopment of the 18-acre former EMI record plant in Hayes, Middlesex, where groundbreaking albums by The Beatles and Pink Floyd were once pressed.The site is located just 300 yards away from Hayes & Harlington railway station, also a stop on the Elizabeth Line (Crossrail) scheduled to open in 2021.EcoWorld is an award-winning Malaysian-based property developer focused on providing sustainable property around the world.Be:here Hayes (pictured below) offers 119 one and two-bedroom apartments. The development is pet-friendly and features on-site concierge services and free super-fast 30Mbps broadband for residents.Leisure facilitiesThe development also features restaurants and leisure facilities and has a 7,000 sq ft roof terrace for residents.The Old Vinyl Factory also taps into its musical past with a live music venue.Movebubble CEO Aidan Rushby welcomed the partnership with EcoWorld.“Our exciting partnership with EcoWorld allows us further to increase the number of high-calibre spaces available on the Movebubble platform while collaborating with a partner that champions sustainable practices in the property industry,” he said.“Renters are becoming more aware of companies with a green ethos, and developments such as be:here Hayes provide renters with such renting opportunity in the capital.”Vinny Bhander, managing director of residential investment at EcoWorld, added: “Be:here Hayes is an exciting development that was built for the modern-day renter, and Movebubble provides the perfect platform to market it to London’s growing number of renters.”Ecoworld Hayes Vinyl Factory proptech firms London rental property eco-homes March 11, 2020Richard ReedWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Land & New Homes » Wish you were here? Movebubble inks deal for EcoWorld site previous nextLand & New HomesWish you were here? Movebubble inks deal for EcoWorld siteThe lettings app Movebubble has signed a deal with Malaysian developer, EcoWorld, to market rentals on the site where Pink Floyd records were made.Richard Reed11th March 20200530 Viewslast_img read more

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