White collar crime

first_imgYa’ll please excuse me. I really, really intended to flood your eyeballs with stories from last weekend’s AFC and NFC Championship games but alas, thoughts and nightmares about the freakin’ NCAA woke me up repeatedly on Sunday night and if I have nightmares I am inclined to share them with you, the readers who most of the time, unbeknownst to “yinz” guys, function as my “proxy therapists.” Why was the darn NCAA founded in the first place? If we are to believe the very words of the NCAA itself, the very formation of the organization was to police the game of football in an attempt to insure the physical well-being of the student-athletes participating in a brutal sport being played in the midst of one of the most nastiest and volatile periods in the history of the world, the Industrial Revolution.How did the rules-makers and the advocates of student welfare become the money takers? According to their website, “for several years, the NCAA was a discussion group and rules-making body; but in 1921, the first NCAA national championship was held.The evolution of the organization continued but a series of crises brought the NCAA to a crossroads after World War II. The “Sanity Code”—adopted to establish guidelines for recruiting and financial aid—failed to curb abuses involving student-athletes. Post-season football games were multiplying rapidly. Member institutions were increasingly concerned about the effects of unrestricted television on football attendance. A national headquarters was established in Kansas City, Mo., in 1952. A program to control live television of football games was approved, the annual convention delegated enforcement powers to the association’s council and legislation was adopted governing post-season bowl games.Now this is where it begins to get a bit tricky. The NCAA was now leaving the lonely road of “money watchers” and exiting onto the “getting paid” expressway. Is this possibly where the seeds of corruption were planted or were there “tubers of greed” already flourishing underground from the dark rich influx of high school athletes?Ah, now we are getting warm, boys and girls. The NCAA realized that if you controlled which athletes were recruited and awarded scholarships, you controlled the revenue from television and game attendance. Well as far as the NCAA’s loot collecting is concerned: game, set, match. Their own history does not say that they continued to fret over the academic and physical welfare of their student-athletes that attended their member universities but the revenue gained from the broadcast of those events as well as the gravy from game attendance concerned the organization more because they had less than full control of the revenue stream.The greed of the NCAA is not my only concern. On Nov. 7, 2009 an article on espn.com profiled the diversity or lack of in regards to the head coaching ranks in the NCAA the article said that: “Days after the election of the country’s first Black president, a study shows the number of African-American coaches in major college football is not growing.With the recent dismissals of Ty Willingham at Washington and Ron Prince at Kansas State, the number of Black head coaches in the 119-school NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision was reduced to four.In 1997, there were eight Black head coaches, the most in history. In 1993 and 2005, there were only three.Fifty-five percent of all student-athletes are minorities.Now let’s see if my math is even slightly on target. 119 divided by 55 = 2.16. Even if we round the aforementioned sum down to 2.0 that figure based on the percentage of minority athletes participating in the football programs at NCAA member institutions, every other school should have a Black head coach. That is not going to happen, okay, but to have an African-American football headmaster in 25 to 30 percent of the colleges is not jumping on the “little red wagon” of affirmative action. If recruiters from these schools can relentlessly pursue Black athletes then that same zeal and passion should be used to get Black coaches to patrol the sidelines of the gridiron and the courtsides of the basketball arenas.Based on the past and present of the NCAA, the organization, aside from when it was in its infancy, has lost the empathy for the actual condition of the student-athletes that it was initially formed to protect. When it comes to trusting the NCAA let me put it this way. My father used to say, “Don’t worry about the guy who wants to borrow your car three times a week, you should lose sleep over the pal who has to come over and borrow a cup of sugar twice a week just around the time that you have punched in at work.”(Aubrey Bruce can be reached at [email protected] or at aubreybruce.blogspot.com.)last_img read more

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Proposed $40 million settlement set for players

first_imgEd O’Bannon, a former UCLA basketball player, was the driving force behind filing the initial lawsuit. (Isaac Brekken/AP Photo/File)A $40 million settlement has been completed that will pay college football and basketball players dating to 2003 for the use of their likenesses in NCAA-branded videogames.The payouts could go to more than 100,000 athletes, including some current players, who were either on college rosters or had their images used in videogames made by Electronic Arts featuring college teams. Lawyers for the plaintiffs say it would be the first time college athletes will be paid for the commercial use of their images.Depending on how many athletes apply for the settlement, the payments could range from as little as $48 for each year an athlete was on a roster to $951 for each year the image of an athlete was used in a videogame.“We’re incredibly pleased with the results of this settlement and the opportunity to right a huge wrong enacted by the NCAA and EA against these players and their rights of publicity,” said Steve Berman, one of the lead attorneys in the case. “We’ve fought against intense legal hurdles since filing this case in 2009 and to see this case come to fruition is a certain victory.”The settlement is with Electronic Arts and Collegiate Licensing Co., which licenses and markets college sports, and does not include the NCAA. The case against the NCAA is scheduled for trial early next year.Plaintiffs in the case, which dates to 2009, contend the NCAA conspired with Electronic Arts and Collegiate Licensing Co. to illegally use their images in videogames.U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken still must approve the proposed settlement, which comes on the eve of a major antitrust trial against the NCAA that could reshape the way college sports operate. That case, featuring former UCLA basketball star Ed O’Bannon and others as lead plaintiffs, goes to trial June 9 in Oakland, California.According to documents filed with the court late Friday, attorneys for O’Bannon and 20 other plaintiffs say they have already run up legal fees exceeding $30 million and expenses of more than $4 million in pressing their case. They are seeking an injunction that would stop the NCAA from enforcing rules that prohibit athletes from profiting from their play in college.O’Bannon, who led UCLA to a national title in 1995, is also part of the group settling with EA Sports and Collegiate Licensing Co. Also covered by the settlement are suits brought by former Arizona State quarterback Sam Keller, former West Virginia football player Shawne Alston and former Rutgers player Ryan Hart.According to the filing, a pool of money will be available to players after attorneys take 33 percent of the proposed settlement and up to $2.5 million in expenses. Named plaintiffs like O’Bannon and Keller will receive $15,000, while others who joined the suit later would get $2,500 or $5,000.The majority of the money, however, will go to athletes who file for claims, a group that attorneys say could contain between 140,000 and 200,000 players who were on football and basketball rosters from 2003 on. The final payouts will depend on how many of those athletes file claims in the class-action case.EA Sports announced last year it would stop making the long-running NCAA football videogame series because of the litigation and other issues in securing licensing rights.last_img read more

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Watch: Bryan Lasme scores a Puskás Award contender for FC Sochaux-Montbeliard

first_imgImage Courtesy: Getty ImagesAdvertisement 8t70pNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs1htvWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Efkff( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 3w17Would you ever consider trying this?😱1rtyeCan your students do this? 🌚9uRoller skating! Powered by Firework The spectacular game has seen its fair share of spectacular goals, and those that turn up to become the contender for FIFA Puskás Award each year. In the not so known Coupe de la Ligue in France, such a goal was scored by FC Sochaux-Montbeliard player Bryan Lasme.Advertisement Image Courtesy: Getty ImagesYesterday in the away match against Paris FC at Stade Sébastien Charléty, the Ligue 2 side forward shot a breathtaking goal from 35 yards outside the box, that can easily become a contender for the Puskás award this year. The clip of the goal was posted by the club’s official Twitter. See the eye catching strike yourself-Advertisement The 20 year old’s magnificent showcase of flair at the 36th minute was the opener of the match. However, the hosts came back in the second half with a goal from Oussama Abdeldjelil and Jonathan Pitroipa, the latter netting one from the spot. Les Lionceaux lost the match 1-2.Despite the loss, Lasme’s screamer was the main talk following the match, and soon after had taken the social media by storm.Lasme was called up for the French Under-20 Football team, and made his debut at the 2018 Toulon Tournament.FC Sochaux will face Laurient in their upcoming Ligue 2 match on Friday at Stade du Moustoir. Advertisementlast_img read more

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