SD District Attorneys office forms special unit to prosecute animal cruelty

first_img May 30, 2018 Sasha Foo Posted: May 30, 2018 Sasha Foo, SD District Attorney’s office forms special unit to prosecute animal cruelty 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — The San Diego County District Attorney’s office is launching its first unit dedicated to the prosecution of crimes involving animal cruelty.The new unit, the first of its kind in the county, will work as an arm of the Family Protection Division which also handles crimes involving child abuse, domestic violence and elder abuse.District Attorney Summer Stephan said that animal abuse cases often serve as an early indicator that a person is developing a pattern of seeking power and control through abusing others.The D.A. said 13% of the office’s animal cruelty cases also involve a defendant with a history of domestic violence.“When animals in a home are abused or neglected, it is a warning sign that others in the household may be in danger,” Stephan said.According to the D.A., 70 percent of animal abusers also have records for other crimes. Veteran prosecutor Karra Reedy will be the head of the new unit.“I tend to see these days a lot more violent cases where people are just outright being violent to animals; stomping them, kicking them and breaking their bones,” Reedy said.When we asked her why this is occurring, she replied, ” I wish I could answer that question. I think if we could answer that question, we’d be able to prevent a lot of animal abuse or violent crime on people, for that matter.”Prosecutors will partner with police, Sheriff’s deputies, the Department of Animal Service, animal control officers and the San Diego Humane Society to hold abusers accountable.The San Diego Humane Society will collaborate with the D.A.’s office on cases of animal cruelty in the city of San Diego, starting July 1. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Read More »

Virtual Help for Real Entrepreneurs

first_imgOctober 14, 2008 4 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. If you’re like most entrepreneurs, you’ve got piles of paper cluttering your office and to-do lists that seem to be multiplying like rabbits. The good news is that many of the tasks that keep you from being as productive (and profitable) as you could be can be outsourced. You may not think you can afford to hire help, especially in these economically turbulent times. But the fact is you can’t afford not to.Today’s Profit FormulaThe internet lets you access scads of talented folks with a click of your mouse. And while some tasks, such as filing or greeting clients, might require on-site work, many administrative, marketing and sales functions can be handily accomplished using the services of one or more Virtual Assistants (VAs).Having a VA frees you up to do what you do best. The smart profit formula for lots of successful entrepreneurs (whether they’re a firm of one or many) involves a little front-end investment for maximum returns.For example, Danny Bradbury, a Canadian freelance writer with clients in his home country, the UK and the Middle East, has seen his workload decrease by 25 percent and business increase 30 percent since using a VA for administrative tasks, such as scheduling interviews, transcribing interviews, tracking down contacts, doing back research and registering him for webinars. Sounds like a darn good deal, right?Three More Takes Regarding VA’s.Laurie Macomber, president of Colo.-based Blue Skies Marketing, an SEO company serving clients across the country, uses a team of virtual workers from different areas (including Canada) to handle diverse functions. Her VA, Melissa Silva, runs Alchemy Virtual Office Solutions out of her Georgia home. She accomplishes an impressive list of tasks for Macomber, including:Team management and communicationsScheduling and tracking jobsSetting up virtual password protected communications and file sharing systemSending presents to clients for referrals, writing and sending out handwritten thank you notesResearchProofreading and “prettying up” documentsAccording the Macomber, aka the Google Guru, along with the benefit of having time to run her business, she loves that she doesn’t have to deal with any personnel or HR issues typically associated with a part-time or full-time employee.”At first I thought it was outrageous when I discovered the cost would range from $30 to $35 an hour, but their hour is so efficient,” Macomber says. “Their 15 minutes is another person’s hour.”Michael Katz, chief penguin of Blue Penguin Development, an electronic newsletter relationship marketing firm in Massachusetts) concurs. He went back to work with a VA after a three-month stint with a less productive employee. His L.A.-based VA, who works for Ohio-based Coaches Marketing Source, handles behind-the-scenes tasks that include the mail server and shopping cart, as well as projects related to spell checking and what Katz calls “important detail work.”Katz found his VA through a friend’s recommendation. Katz says his VA experience has been purely positive. “She allows me to be more effective. I know that there’s a direct connection between the increased income I see coming in,” Katz says, adding it covers the expense of paying his VA.Kim Beasley is the owner and senior developer of several businesses, including CustomizeWordPress and Agape3 Business Services, a five-year-old web design and business consulting firm in St. Louis. She has clients all over the world, including Australia and Canada, due in no small part to her team of VAs. Unlike Katz, who prefers to utilize his VA for back-end tasks, Beasley assembled a VA team of professionals with specific skill sets that directly handle many of the services she offers. Her three VAs take care of graphic design, content management, audio and video editing, as well as a range of internal administrative work like managing Beasley’s calendar, scheduling webinars and training, putting networking information on Facebook, etc.”I believe in using the strengths of my VAs, and those things I feel I can outsource, I do,” Beasley says.Because of the web and the various business-related portals and programs (such as Basecamp, GotoMeeting, Twitter and Facebook) these entrepreneurs can do everything a traditional brick-and-mortar does, and more; including client prospecting, account management, selling products and providing services. Effective VAs are worth their weight in gold. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Register Now »last_img read more

Read More »

The NextGeneration Corvette Is Radically Different Heres What Led GM President Mark

first_img When it came time for Corvette Chief Engineer Tadge Juechter to convince General Motors execs that the eighth generation of the iconic sports car needed a mid-engine configuration, he had his work cut out for him. After all, since the first Vette rolled off the line back in 1953, the engine has been up front. One bigwig, however, didn’t need to be swayed. “Several leaders needed a lot of hand-holding and were non-believers,” Juechter tells Entrepreneur, “but I never had to convince Mark Reuss. He knew it was the right thing to do.”Right from the get-go, GM’s president believed this radical change was necessary for the C8, as the next generation is known. Placing the engine behind the driver and in front of the rear axle — which improves acceleration, braking and handling — is an engineering feat normally reserved for wildly expensive supercars from the likes of Ferrari, Lamborghini and McLaren. A mid-engine Corvette sends the message that America’s sub-six-figure sports car (the starting price will be under $60,000) is ready to stand wheel-to-wheel with the world’s best. Based on the overwhelmingly positive response at its unveiling in Tustin, Calif., on Thursday evening, Reuss, Juechter and the rest of the team were on to something.Related: To Stand Out in a Crowded Field, the Designers of the New Chevy Blazer Asked: ‘What Would a Camaro SUV Look Like?’As both a lifelong Corvette fan and longtime GM employee — he began his career there as a student intern in 1983 — Reuss is uniquely positioned to oversee the development of a vehicle many view as revolutionary. We spoke to him on the eve of the car’s reveal to learn how he found the confidence to remake a legend, his message to doubters and why moving the engine to the middle doesn’t make the C8 any less of a Corvette.Image Credit: General MotorsThis is the first mid-engine Corvette in the vehicle’s over 65-year history. How apprehensive were you about making such a huge change to an American icon?You’re always a bit nervous to mess with success, especially with a legendary vehicle like the Corvette. However, the current generation, the C7, had pushed the limits of what could be done with that configuration — it is the absolute best. To take performance to the next level for our customers, we had to move to mid-engine.What gave you and your team the confidence to make this change?First was the confidence in our Engineering, Racing and Design team. This group lives and breathes Corvette, and they are students of performance. When they said they were ready, I knew it was time. Second, mid-engine has always been part of Corvette’s destiny. We have explored mid-engine concepts dating back to the original CERV I from 1960. Corvette’s original chief engineer, Zora Arkus-Duntov, famously advocated for mid-engine vehicles, but we needed to make sure we kept Corvette true to its roots of attainable performance. Mid-engine has historically posed a challenge to this mission; not so anymore. The time has come, today, and we feel both Corvette traditionalists and potential new customers will embrace the change in layout.Related: The 8 Best Dream Cars of 2019 for EntrepreneursThere must have been — and continue to be — plenty of naysayers, both internally and externally, who don’t think a Corvette should be mid-engined. How did you maintain your vision, and how do you respond to them?Internally, I remind them that we don’t set the standard for Corvette; our customers do. Our job is to exceed those standards and remain faithful to the brand promise. This car does all of that and more. It will quiet the naysayers on both sides of the wall quickly once they see it and, especially, once they drive it.Tell us about your personal history with the Corvette.Simply put, this car is the reason I work at General Motors. In the mid-’60s, I spent many car trips hunched in the back of a Corvette riding with my dad. On Saturdays he would take me to work at the Chevrolet engineering building, and I made him promise to take me to the research labs to see the new Corvette. Everything this car stands for — its presence, performance and heritage — raises the hair on the back of my neck. Most importantly, Corvette has always embodied the company’s resilient spirit by demonstrating what it means to win and be the best.How would you describe the essence of a Corvette, and what steps did you make to maintain that spirit in the new generation?No matter the configuration, Corvette has to live up to its fundamentals: performance, functionality and attainability. No other car delivers on all of those points like Corvette does. Whether you’re on your daily commute, hitting the track or taking a long weekend trip, the Corvette can do it all, and then some. That’s what we need to build on. Corvette has always taken design cues from fighter jets, and this one is no different. From the forward cabin to the driver focused interior, it truly feels like a proper cockpit. These are some of the key attributes that we wanted to build on. Related: Porsche Is Giving Their Dealerships the ‘Disneyland’ Treatment, and It’s a Great Lesson in Adapting to Consumer TrendsWhat are the biggest changes in the C8?The mid-engine layout is the biggest change. This new layout enables better weight distribution, power to the ground and acceleration. This will be the fastest Corvette ever, capable of zero to 60 in less than three seconds — and we didn’t compromise a thing to get there. This new layout and its many performance attributes will deliver an elevated supercar experience. Our current C7 and those before it had a powerful presence, but this new mid-engine eclipses anything we have done in the past. Our design and engineering teams did an excellent job, working together to create a mid-engine vehicle that still looks like a Corvette, while providing even more performance and functionality. On the interior, nearly all the parts are hand-wrapped and stitched, and all the decorative trim and attention to detail reflects the premium craftsmanship that was our mandate from the beginning of development.  You mentioned the design was inspired by fighter jets. Corvettes were popular with astronauts in the ’60s — would you say Chevy is connecting the vehicle back to its roots?Every Corvette has been inspired by the aircraft of the era, and this new Corvette continues that tradition. Chevrolet’s design team looked at jet fighters as inspiration — the epitome of design and performance. Advancements in precision engineering, design and technology have combined to push the boundaries of propulsion and aerodynamics. These are traits that Corvette has always embodied. NASA and aviation have always inspired the designers and engineers that created every generation of Corvette.Image Credit: General MotorsWith so many competitors in the sports car space, how do you maintain an edge? How did you encourage your team to think differently when bringing this car to life?If we remain true to Corvette’s brand mission and deliver innovation and performance at an attainable price, we will maintain our advantage. I pushed the team to find new technologies, materials and solutions that improve the entire experience for the customer. Having a racing team really provides an advantage, too. We learn a lot on the track that then transfers over to the street.Related: Here’s How the Entrepreneur Behind Carvana Got the Idea That’s Revolutionizing the Way We Buy CarsYou’ve climbed the ranks at GM. Have you learned more from your successes or your failures?Life is a series of successes and failures, hopefully more of the former than the latter, but if you’re doing it right, you learn a lot from both. That’s what I’ve tried to do, and that’s what we’ve tried to teach our children to do. The same theory applies whether you’re going to school, starting a new job or launching a new vehicle. Always be learning.What do see for the future of Corvette? Can you envision an electric model? An autonomous version?We’ve just started the journey on C8; it’s going to be a long and exciting trip. Stay tuned! July 19, 2019 Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globalcenter_img 8 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.last_img read more

Read More »