Gardai following ‘definite lines of enquiry’ after tricolour theft in Lifford

first_imgGarda investigations are continuing into the theft of tricolour flags from Lifford bridge last week ahead of Sunday’s Hunger Strike Commemoration.A number of flags were taken from the bridge just hours after they were erected for the major event last weekend.Gardaí have confirmed that they are following some ‘definite lines of enquiry’ as they continue to appeal for public information. The occupants of two Northern Ireland registered cars – a red BMW and white Astra – are suspected as being involved in the theft on Thursday night/Friday morning.The incident occurred between 12.05am and 12.20am on the morning of Friday 2nd August.The suspects also reportedly subjected local people to sectarian abuse after they were confronted.CCTV footage is set to be studied from the time of the incident. Anyone with any information which may assist in the investigation is being asked to contact Garda Damien Sheridan via Letterkenny Garda Station on 074 9167 100. The public can also provide information through the Garda confidential line on 1800 666 111.Gardai following ‘definite lines of enquiry’ after tricolour theft in Lifford was last modified: August 6th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More »

US export record for Mercedes-Benz SA

first_img19 October 2010Mercedes-Benz South Africa scored a double success this week, loading a record 3 280 C-Class vehicles onto a ship bound for the United States, including the 100 000th C-Class vehicle to be exported to the US from the automaker’s East London plant.“This week saw Mercedes-Benz South Africa export its largest ever single consignment of Mercedes-Benz C-Class cars destined for US customers,” Mercedes-Benz SA CEO Hansgeorg Niefer said in a statement.JD Power Platinum Award“This volume of vehicles from our East London plant reaffirms that US customers are very satisfied with the South African build quality, and underpins the reasons Mercedes-Benz SA received the 2010 JD Power Platinum Award for initial quality earlier this year.”The award was based on a US survey conducted among over 80 000 US new car owners earlier this year.“The local plant was thus named the best plant in the world – best among all brands and manufacturers serving the US,” said Rainer Ruess, manufacturing site leader at the plant.Harbour deepeningTerry Taylor, corporate affairs manager of Transnet National Ports Authority, remarked that the recent deepening of the west quay at the East London harbour had reaped immediate benefits.“The new depth allows more flexibility for larger vessels,” he said. “Together with this, we also added another 1 200 parking bays in close proximity to the quay-side. The total cost of the development was just over R40-million.”SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Read More »

Hop on, hop off – and experience Jozi

first_imgThe unmissable red buses are a great new way of seeing the sights and sounds of Johannesburg. The tour also passes by interesting sites such as the Central Methodist Church, long known as a refuge for homeless people, migrants and refugees. The CEOs of the local and worldwide City Sightseeing operations, Claus Tworeck and Enrique Ybarra, with members of the Johannesburg team.(Images: Janine Erasmus) MEDIA CONTACTS • Carmen Lerm  City Sightseeing media enquiries  +27 82 825 5715 • Laura Vercueil  Johannesburg Tourism media enquiries  +27 82 920 2574 RELATED ARTICLES • Touring Joburg like never before • CT’s transport system lauded • Rea Vaya handed over to taxi industry • New lease on life for Joburg buildingsJanine ErasmusThe red buses have arrived – Johannesburg’s open-top city sightseeing service has officially launched and is expected to boost tourism in the vibrant multi-cultural city, especially in its southern suburbs.The event took place at Gold Reef City, the popular casino and theme park located to the south of Johannesburg’s CBD. Dignitaries present included Rob Collins, the chief marketing officer of hotel group Tsogo Sun; acting CEO of Johannesburg Tourism Phelisa Mangcu; Dawn Robertson, CEO of Gauteng Tourism; various officials from the provincial government and city management; and Spain’s Enrique Ybarra, CEO of City Sightseeing Worldwide, who brought his family along for the fun.City Sightseeing Joburg is operated by a local team headed by bus enthusiast and expert Claus Tworeck. The instantly recognisable global brand has been in Cape Town since 2004 and was introduced to Johannesburg in mid-2012. Since then it’s been a matter of working out the glitches and fine-tuning the logistics, and the service is now ready to roll in the only country in Africa to host City Sightseeing.The initiative has been helped along by the Gauteng provincial government, the City of Johannesburg, City Sightseeing and Tsogo Sun, the Johannesburg Development Agency, the Johannesburg Roads Agency and others. All have played a role in bringing the red buses to Johannesburg’s streets.“South Africa is not just about Cape Town or safari lodges,” said Collins. “Johannesburg is also a great destination. We at the Tsogo Sun love tourism and we want to help show that there are many places still to be appreciated by Jozi residents, never mind South Africans and international visitors.”These places will flourish, he said, with the help of services such as City Sightseeing. The inner city has been undergoing a revival for some years now, but there is also much interesting heritage to be found in the south.“Tourism is important to boost small and medium enterprises,” said Ruby Mathang, member of the mayoral committee for economic development. “The red buses will give access to many of these SMMEs.”“Having Johannesburg in our group means that it will be part of our global marketing programme,” said Ybarra. “This includes tourism trade shows around the world. We will carry the city of Johannesburg with us everywhere.”Ybarra commended the local team for its professionalism.“We want to get as many locals and visitors as possible not only on to the bus,” said Tworeck, “but off it, so that they can meet the wonderful people of Johannesburg. I want them to fall in love with this city and then go back home and spread the word.”At the moment the buses run only in Johannesburg, but there are plans to take them to Sandton and Tshwane, and Soweto was also mentioned.A different way to explore the cityThe service runs every day between 09h00 and 17h00, with a break on Christmas Day. The last bus to do a complete circuit leaves at 16h30.Tickets for adults cost R150 (US$17) and are available from the City Sightseeing office at Gold Reef City as well as on the buses and online, discounted to R120 ($13) for the latter option. If buying a ticket on the bus, the only payment option is a credit card. Kids between five and 15 pay R70 ($8) while toddlers under five travel free.The ticket is valid for the day of purchase only, but it serves a further purpose and that is to provide the bearer with a 10% discount for a City Sightseeing tour anywhere in the world.The route starts and ends at Park Station in town, but passengers may hop off at any stop along the way, explore the attractions in that part of town, and hop on to the next bus when it comes along. Secure parking is available at stops one and six, Park Station and Gold Reef City.Buses leave every 40 minutes, and there are 12 stops. After Park Station the bus stops at transport hub Gandhi Square, then the Carlton Centre – still the tallest building in Africa – then Santarama Miniland, the James Hall Transport Museum and Gold Reef City.From there it’s just a quick drive across the road to the Apartheid Museum, then on to the mining district in the CBD, the arty Newtown precinct, over the Nelson Mandela Bridge to the Origins Centre at Wits University, The Grove in Braamfontein and Constitution Hill before heading back to Park Station.Passengers can listen to commentary in numerous languages, including Portuguese, English, Zulu, German and Dutch, and there’s a special kids’ channel as well.last_img read more

Read More »

Nelson Mandela’s life on the run, captured

first_imgThe site of Nelson Mandela’s capture in the KwaZulu-Natal midlands is commemorated by  a piece of art completed in 2011, it’s 50 columns symbolising the 50 years since Mandela’s arrest.The walk down to the sculpture allows the visitor “a moment to reflect on the long walk” Mandela took, rooted as it is within the landscape. (Image: SA Tourism)Lucille DavieIt was 17 months of “freedom”. This was how the Black Pimpernel described his time in disguise and on the run from the apartheid Security Police.“Suddenly, in front of us, the Ford was signalling to us to stop. I knew in that instant that my life on the run was over; my 17 months of ‘freedom’ were about to end,” Nelson Mandela, the Black Pimpernel, wrote in his autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom.He had gone into hiding straight after the not guilty verdict of the Treason Trial, on 29 March 1961. In that trial, which began in 1956, 156 people were in the dock for treason. It ran for almost five years. “I did not return home after the verdict. Although others were in a festive mood and eager to celebrate, I knew the authorities could strike at any moment, and I did not want to give them the opportunity. I was anxious to be off before I was banned or arrested, and I spent the night in a safe house in Johannesburg. It was a restless night in a strange bed, and I started at the sound of every car, thinking it might be the police.”His time as the Black Pimpernel – a reference to the 1905 play The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Emma Orczy – was over when that Ford stopped his car on 5 August 1962. In effect, he only experienced freedom 29 years later, in 1990, when he was released from Victor Verster Prison in Cape Town. Mandela had just paid a secret visit to the ANC president and Nobel Peace Prize laureate, Chief Albert Luthuli, in Durban, urging him to switch to armed struggle to end apartheid. He was on his way back to Johannesburg when the car he was in was stopped about five kilometres outside Howick.He was sentenced to five years in prison for leaving the country without a passport and for inciting workers across the country to stage a stay-at-home. But it was in the Rivonia Trial shortly afterwards that he received a life sentence and was sent to Robben Island.Mandela’s experience in the quiet, unassuming place where he was arrested, referred to as the Capture Site, is indelibly marked by a striking sculpture, consisting of 50 thin steel columns, each between 6.5 metres and 9.5 metres tall.Steel columnsCompleted in 2011, the 50 columns are symbolic of the 50 years since Mandela’s arrest. On first viewing they look like an emaciated, leafless mini forest, but at a certain point – 35 metres away – the gentle image of Mandela’s face comes into focus, looking west, with a faint smile playing around his lips.“The 50 columns represent the 50 years since his capture, but they also suggest the idea of many making the whole, of solidarity,” says the artist, Marco Cianfanelli. “It points to an irony as the political act of Mandela’s incarceration cemented his status as an icon of struggle, which helped ferment the groundswell of resistance, solidarity and uprising, bringing about political change and democracy.”Suggestive of prison bars, the serrated steel columns are made more oppressive by them rising into the sky almost 10 metres. (Image: SA Tourism)The portrait was achieved “from interpreting composites of several portraits of Mandela, [and] is appropriately monumental, yet fittingly transient and delicate”.Closely packed, the steel columns are suggestive of prison bars, made more oppressive by them rising into the sky almost 10 metres. Their edges are serrated, adding to a feeling of coarseness, but essential to create the image of the face.Small museumA small museum in a temporary shed, emblazoned with enlarged images of Mandela and the places of significance to him, from his childhood and early adulthood, begin the site. From there, the visitor is invited to take a long walk, of some 400 metres, down to the road, to view the sculpture.It leads through a channel with grassy banks; drawing closer, the image becomes more apparent. Then at exactly 35 metres, Mandela’s face materialises, magically. He is looking westwards, down the road he would have continued along 53 years ago. Step beyond the 35m mark, and the face disappears again. In an extraordinary visual trick, the image is more defined once photographed, through a single lens. Through the naked eye, with two lenses, the detail is not as clear, says Cianfanelli.Christopher Till, the director of the Apartheid Museum in Johannesburg and the Gold Museum in Cape Town, and the person responsible for the project and site development of the Capture Site, says he is pleased with this dimension to the sculpture. “The camera lens brings it together,” he explains.Till says the long stroll down to the sculpture allows the visitor “a moment to reflect on the long walk” Mandela took, rooted as it is within the landscape. He hopes it will energise the visitor.The magic continues within the tall columns, an area of about five metres by 21 metres in size. They encase one, but at the same time have an air of ethereal lightness in their delicate thinness – perhaps it’s just the thought that here is the image of Mandela; here is the place where his life as a “free” but on-the-run black man in apartheid South Africa came to an end, and he disappeared from public life for 27 years.Permanent museum and visitors’ centreIn early March construction of a permanent museum and visitors’ centre will begin, to be completed by August. A different trail will lead away from the sculpture, back to the museum, again giving an opportunity to stop and reflect. In the third and fourth phase of development an indigenous garden will be developed along the paths.It is not known precisely where the actual site of arrest was, but it is fairly certain that it was here or near to this site. A small brick monument across the road from the sculpture is now a heritage site, as it would have been on the left side of the road that Mandela’s car would have been stopped, heading to Joburg.The site is on the Midlands Meander, a network of routes in the rolling green hills of KwaZulu-Natal. The meander has a range of accommodation offerings, restaurants, outdoor events and activities, historic landmarks, wildlife spots, and numerous arts and crafts venues. It is not far from the battlefields that dot KwaZulu-Natal, and the Drakensberg, South Africa’s highest mountain range.Cianfanelli has done another Mandela sculpture – outside Chancellor House in the Joburg CBD. It is a 5m tall metal sculpture of Mandela in boxing pose, a copy of a 1953 photograph by Bob Gosani. It was taken on the rooftop of the South African Associated Newspapers building in downtown Joburg. Mandela had law offices with Oliver Tambo, his partner in the practice, on the second floor of Chancellor House. The sculpture is entitled Shadow Boxing, and is done in flat steel in shades of grey and charcoal. It is a striking portrait of a young, energetic Mandela taking time out.“The two significant public pieces I have done on Nelson Mandela are not conventional sculptures or commemorative portraits,” says Cianfanelli. “I felt quite a sense of pressure and responsibility to represent a great man, in an appropriate yet unique manner. It has been a humbling experience as well as an honour for me, to have so many people from different places and backgrounds, respond so positively, with excitement and emotion, to these works.”Directions and map to the Capture Site are available online.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Read More »

Energy Efficient Housing’s Uphill Battle in Japan

first_imgLike most musicians at the top of their game, West Coast five-string banjo master Bill Evans peppers his schedule with plenty of performance tours, including the occasional trip overseas. One of those engagements took him to Kobe, Japan, where he experienced firsthand both the thrill of playing to Japan’s extremely receptive bluegrass fans and the wintertime chill of a typical Japanese home.Bill, who was my long-suffering banjo teacher when I lived in the Bay Area, told me that upon returning to his hosts’ home after his performance, he decided to write a song inspired by his visit to Kobe. He added, however, that his musical creation was greatly facilitated by a decidedly nonmusical device – a spot-heating gadget on a patch of floor in the home, which, like many houses in Japan, lacked a central HVAC system.“The house was very cold … and my hosts instructed me to sit on a carpet placed in the middle of the living room floor,” Bill explained in an email. “These heated carpets can get you very warm very quickly. I pulled my banjo out and, sitting on the rug, I finished composing the tune.”The song turned out well (click here for a listen), and as he mulled possible titles, Bill considered using whatever exotic name the Japanese use for the heated carpet. It turns out, though, the name for the carpet is hot-to carpet-to. Perhaps the principal reason Bill went with “Kobe Blues.”A change of tune for Japan’s builders?Being called on the heated carpet was a unique experience for Bill. But it is a familiar one for the Japanese, whose homebuilders, as a recent Deutsche-Welle TV video feature points out, offer some beautiful and ingenious designs and fixtures, but tend to favor an extremely light touch when insulating residential exteriors and a “personal device” touch when conditioning interiors. Sitting on or near heat-broadcasting appliances – toilets and carpets, blanketed tables (kotatsu) whose undersides are equipped with heating elements, and kerosene burners – is, observes Toyko-based online magazine SNOW, a widely shared experience during the winter months.The encouraging news is that some sectors of the housing industry seem to have begun inching toward energy efficient construction, at least in principle. The Deutsche-Welle video, for example, focuses on the green-construction advocacy of Miwa Mori, an architect with Key Architects, in Kanagawa. One of Mori’s exemplary projects is a Japanese home built to Passivhaus standards.Too, the Japanese government recently began subsidizing the construction of well-insulated buildings, Deutsche-Welle notes in the video narrative, which also includes affirming comments by a representative of one of the leading industry groups, the Japan Federation of Housing Organizations. The representative, Takao Fujimura, tells the interviewer that “current laws are sufficient” to propel the industry toward greener construction and that “if the leading companies’ guidelines become the industry standard, we’ll improve our energy footprint even more.”Mori is skeptical of the JFHO party line, however. The market for well-insulated housing, she says, is still too small to motivate Japan’s big prefab-construction manufacturers to invest in better-insulated shells, roofs, and foundations. “It’s too expensive for them,” she says. “They want maximum profits. It will take a law to get them to change.”last_img read more

Read More »

The Hustler’s Playbook: Hustlers Persevere

first_imgHustlers persevere. The hustler is determined to achieve their goals. It doesn’t matter how difficult the goal is to obtain. It doesn’t matter how many obstacles they need to overcome to reach their goals. The hustler keeps at it, chipping away, relentlessly taking action until they succeed.The non-hustler most of all seeks comfort. If something makes them uncomfortable, they’ll do everything in their power to avoid it. If the primary tasks that would allow them to reach their goal is difficult, they’ll change their goal. Determination means you continue to try even when you make little progress. The non-hustler doesn’t like obstacles. Two or three significant obstacles breaks their will.The hustler has intestinal fortitude. Intestinal fortitude is a combination of courage and endurance. Hustlers face their fears. They deal with pain (even though most of what we consider pain is only discomfort). They are willing to endure difficulties, setbacks, do-overs, rejection, being mocked by their peers, and even failure. But none of these seemingly negative occurrences ever dissuades them from continuing to pursue their dreams.Non-hustlers lack intestinal fortitude. They aren’t willing to do what is necessary if it means facing their fears or dealing with pain. Where the hustler attached no negative meaning to the events they experience on their way to reaching their goals and finding success, the non-hustler attached only negative meaning. Difficult means impossible. Setbacks mean failure. Rejection is personal. Being mocked is being judged.The hustler is resolute and committed to what’s important. The non-hustler is uncommitted and half-hearted in the few things they are willing to try.Other hustlers recognize a brother or sister of the path when they see their determination, their willingness to persevere. The non-hustler sees someone who doesn’t know better, who should have long ago given up, and someone they can never understand.If you really want what you profess to want, then you have to be willing to persevere, come what may. That’s what hustlers do. Nothing less is acceptable. Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Read More »