Entry clamp down for foreign students

first_imgThe government has proposed a series of changes to the current student visa system, making it more difficult for international students and their dependants to enter the UK and remain here beyond the duration of their course.If the proposal is passed, the new system will have a host of repercussions for the thousands of international students at Oxford.About 14 percent of undergraduate students and 63 percent of full-time postgraduates at Oxford come from outside the UK.In a report issued by the UK Border Agency, Home Secretary Theresa May said, “In recent years, the system as a whole has been allowed to operate in a manner which is not sustainable. “Unchecked migration can place significant pressure on our public services and can damage community cohesion if not properly managed”.Some current Oxford students have questioned whether they would have decided to study in the UK had these regulations been in place when they applied.“I think this will affect people’s decision to come to the UK,” said Weige Wu, a third-year Singaporean undergraduate reading PPE at Queens College. These changes give the impression that the UK is not welcoming to foreigners—and coming to a foreign country, that impression matters.”The Border Agency’s report suggests imposing a higher minimum standard of English language proficiency.Deeksha Sharma, who came from India for her DPhil in Law at Exeter College, recognised that poor English skills can hinder a student’s ability to integrate fully.“International students tend to be proficient in academic English, but if their spoken English is a problem, they are not effectively a part of social life,” she said.This measure could mean that potential Oxford students would have to take an expensive and redundant test, since Oxford expects successful candidates to demonstrate a higher level of English than the government would require. However, the Border Agency is considering excusing students at highly accredited institutions from some of the requirements, in recognition of these institutions’ stringent admissions standards and in the interest of attracting the most able students.Another provision calls for tighter restrictions on international students applying for two degrees in the UK. Students could be required to return home between degrees and apply from overseas.Foreign students would also have to demonstrate that the second degree is at a higher level than the first. This could cause trouble for students intending to undertake a second Masters’ or undergraduate degree at Oxford.At an OUSU meeting on Wednesday, students expressed concern that these restrictions would complicate the visa process, with unintended consequences for Oxford students.“No one is going to do a Masters’ at Oxford just to stay in the UK,” said one graduate student.The plan proposes to restrict or even close the popular two-year post-study work visa, which allows students to spend time after graduation looking for a job or engaging in further study.“If you’re under pressure to find a job while you’re supposed to be studying for finals, you could end up shooting yourself in the foot,” said one graduate student.The new system would also place tighter restrictions on students’ spouses and children, such as prohibiting them from working in the UK. It would limit international students’ ability to work during term-time, restricting them to on-campus jobs.“Is the UK interested in the success of it students?” asked Daniel Ostendorff, an American DPhil student of History at St. Cross College. “Separating someone from their family causes emotional stress.“If my wife couldn’t have come with me and have something purposeful to do, I wouldn’t have come here.”Students have also questioned whether decreasing the number of fee-paying international students makes sense in light of cuts to university funding.“I’m importing money into the UK economy,” said Ostendorff.Some Oxford students, however, support more stringent requirements for immigration.“The current system is detrimental to home students,” said Alexander Jack King, a first year student of Theology at Keble College. “To quote one of the greatest statesmen of all time, ‘British jobs for British workers.’” Gordon Brown’s slogan notwithstanding, one in six UK graduates is unemployed – the highest level in 17 years.The University has voiced fears that “both the UK economy and the University will undoubtedly lose some of the best international students, as well as some incredibly skilled people as a result of the proposed changes.”Julia Paolitto, a spokesperson for the University said, “There is a broad consensus throughout the education sector about the potential negative impact of some of these proposals.”last_img read more

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Turnaround Chef Johndavid Hensley Spins Pub Into Blue Oyster Seafood & Oyster Bar

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The newest addition to Long Island’s restaurant scene is Blue Oyster Seafood & Oyster Bar, a white-tablecloth restaurant that debuted last month where sports bar Bottoms Up once stood in downtown Islip.Executive Chef Johndavid Hensley, a veteran in the restaurant industry, touts classic dishes with contemporary flair and a focus on featuring local and regional ingredients.“My oysters and clams are pretty much dug right here in our backyard,” says Hensley, sitting in a booth as members of the dining staff began setting tables for the dinner rush on a recent Monday.Fitting the restaurant’s motif, blue light floods the dimly lit dining room accented by bright white tablecloths and nautical decals. Techno music thumping in the background completes the nightclub feel. Hensley takes a positive, hands-on approach in managing the kitchen.“I never really tell anybody here what to do,” he says. “I tell them why and how to do it, so they themselves can make discoveries. I want to inspire and empower.”Hensley, who grew up in the Hamptons, got his start in the restaurant business at an early age.“My family, we’re restaurant people,” he says. “So I grew up with it in my blood. I just fell in love with the job and the environment.”He worked his way up the ranks at Hampton Bays’ now-defunct Indian Cove Restaurant and Marina, where he eventually served as executive chef for more than 15 years. In its heyday, the East End fixture ranked high among LI restaurants, receiving four stars from The New York Times three years in a row. Craving the bright lights and big city, he moved to Manhattan in the late ’90s, and bounced around before securing a position as executive chef of the Russian Tea Room, where he worked from 1998 to 2000.“I got a chance to rub elbows with a lot of political dignitaries,” he recalls. “It helped polish my skills with the service aspect of [the industry]. I fell in love, not just with the food, but also the customers and what they represent.”In the following years, Hensley returned to the Island, and worked at The Montauk Yacht Club, Greek Bites Grill in Southampton and Claudio’s Restaurant in Greenport. While discussing his long career in the restaurant industry, a much younger chef approached the booth at Blue Oyster Bar and asked Hensley for a second opinion on a meatball.“It’s fluffy enough, right? Not so dense?” Hensley says, inspecting the chef’s creation. He later explained it was an “Arthur Avenue meatball,” a Blue Oyster appetizer served with whipped ricotta cheese and named for the Little Italy section of the Bronx. After a brief consultation with the other chef, Hensley says, “All right, run with it.”Throughout the course of his career, Hensley says, skilled chefs often took him under their wing, a practice he’s now adopted. He believes strongly in “paying it forward.”“The kids here, when I give them a recipe, I want them to feel it and touch it,” he says. “I like others to discover what made me smile when I was younger.”Blue Oyster Seafood & Oyster Bar serves up a variety of regional and local seafood along with classic dishes and steaks. Appetizers include baked clams with lemon and thyme ($12) and herb-crusted Tuscan wings served with a curry cream dip. Entrée selections include Montauk swordfish with a honey-sweet potato mash and cranberry chutney ($28); traditional paella with shrimp, clams, mussels and chorizo ($32); and French lobster ravioli. That’s in addition to a full raw bar that features a variety of local oysters served daily.Blue Oyster Seafood & Oyster Bar is located at 524-526 Main St. in Islip. They can be reached at 631-446-4233 or blueoysterlongisland.comlast_img read more

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Basil Butcher Trust Fund, Mike’s Pharmacy donate to Berbice Sports Award programme

first_imgTHE very popular Basil Butcher Memorial Trust Fund continues to make a positive difference in the county of Berbice, as the Rose Hall Town Youth and Sports Club (RHTYSC) and the Berbice Cricket Board (BCB) continue to pay tribute to the legendary West Indies Test player whose 87th birthday would be celebrated on the September 3.BCB president and RHTYSC Secretary/CEO, Hilbert Foster, along with a delegation, visited several public institutions over the last weekend to donate dozens of clocks under the fund.The clocks were donated to the RHTYSC by popular businessman, Lakeram Singh, of Mike’s Pharmacy of Bel-Air, Georgetown.Among the recipients were Port Mourant Public Hospital, Rose Hall Town Police Outpost, Rose Hall Post Office, Rose Hall Town Fire Station and Rose Hall Town Council. Plans are also being finalised to provide clocks for every police station and fire station in Region Six.Foster stated that the donations were made as visits to most government offices revealed the absence of clocks, with workers and visitors depending on their cell phones to know the time.The fund also donated a large amount of children’s medicine to Port Mourant Hospital, which would be used in its out-clinics. Foster urged the management of the different recipients to take care of the clocks and promised more assistance in the near future. Most of these institutions had already received cleaning detergents from the fund.Assistant Secretary/CEO, Simon Naidu, disclosed that items worth over $3M have been distributed so far under the fund, including 960 food hampers, cricket gear to 67 young cricketers, cleaning detergents, scorebooks, footwear, clothing, household utilities, educational materials and bicycles. The fund would shortly visit Linden to share cricket gear and cycles to young cricketers and students.Meanwhile, the Fund would also sponsor the Annual Gregory Gaskin Region Six Sports Award Programme. Foster disclosed that five awards would be presented: Sportsman-of-the-Year 2019; Sportswoman-of-the-Year 2019; Sports Association-of-the-Year 2019; Lifetime Achievement Award and Sports Personality-of-the-Year.No ceremony will be held due to the COVID-19  social-distancing guidelines, but the awardees would receive their awards at home.Awardees would receive trophies, medals, certificate of excellence and a collection of gifts.last_img read more

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Badgers prepare for heated Golden Eagle rivalry

first_imgFor the first time this year, the University of Wisconsin will have the opportunity to play a highly anticipated matchup at home, when in-state rival Marquette (6-2) visits Madison Saturday afternoon. Indeed, it will not only be the first “big” home game of the season, but for some of Wisconsin’s freshmen, it will be their first hyped-up Kohl Center contest ever.”The fans, they anticipate this game,” junior forward Alando Tucker said. “It seems like the Kohl Center is always a little louder in here when we are playing Marquette.””We know it is going to be a very important game,” sophomore guard Kammron Taylor said. “The game is definitely going to be intense. We just want to go out there and play our game. We don’t want to get caught up in the hype.”The past four games in the annual series have been won by the home team, a trend that bodes well for the Badgers (6-1). The fact that the game is being played on Wisconsin’s home court might be even more important this season however, as Marquette will bring several key freshmen into their first hostile road environment.Freshman guards Dominic James, Jerel McNeal and Wesley Matthews all will probably be in the Golden Eagles’ starting lineup on Saturday, the core of the Marquette youth movement.Although the trio has had their ups and downs so far this year, James has been the most impressive, leading the team in scoring with an average of 15 points per game and also in assists, dishing out 6.4 per contest.”He’s one of those guys who likes to get up and down the floor. He can catch, he can shoot, so we are going to have to contain him,” said Taylor, who will likely be matched up against James at times Saturday.If the games UW has played earlier this year against upstart shooters are any indication, James could be in for a long afternoon. When Wisconsin played Coastal Carolina, they held 2005 Freshman of the Year Jack Leasure to 2-for-16 shooting (1-for-10 from 3-point range). Pepperdine freshman Michael Gerrity only made four of his 13 shots, many of them in the closing minutes, and against UW-Green Bay Wednesday, heralded freshman Ryan Tillema was held scoreless, going 0-for-8 from the field.Although Wisconsin has fared well against inexperienced shooters this year, when going up against seasoned marksmen, the team hasn’t had the same amount of success. UW-GB’s Ryan Evanochko had his way against the UW defense early in the game and kept the Phoenix in the game with 22 points, while Badger fans will need little reminder of what Wake Forest senior Justin Gray did to the Wisconsin defense, tearing it apart for 37 points.The Badgers will look to do a better job against Marquette’s veteran swingman Steve Novak, who is averaging 14.3 points per game.”A Marquette team is always going to be intense. They are going to play hard-nosed, man-to-man defense, and they have some guys that can create,” Tucker said. “They have a good shooter in Novak and a bunch of guys that can create for him.”The Badgers can also expect a very spirited performance from Marquette, which seems to always save its best game for Wisconsin.”We probably bring out the best in them,” Taylor said.”They are going to try to throw some traps and press to try and get us to speed up our game, but we have to control the tempo,” Tucker said of the high-energy style of play he expects from the Golden Eagles. “We are here at home and we have to be able to control the tempo and get to the free-throw line early.”As if covering the talented Golden Eagles wasn’t difficult enough, Wisconsin will also have to battle their own emotions in the annual grudge match.”We can’t get too much of an emotional high out there,” Tucker said. “Guys are going to have to control their emotions.”Although emotions will surely be running high, the Badgers are still very thankful to have the game being played at home, where Wisconsin will look to build on its 61-3 record at the Kohl Center under Ryan.”Last year, you could probably count [exactly] the amount of fans we had at Marquette,” Taylor said. “But coming up this Saturday, we are going to see nothing but red and white out there.”last_img read more

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Leaf win fourth straight by doubling Rockies 6-3

first_imgBy Bruce Fuhr,The Nelson Daily SportsThe Nelson Leafs returned to their old slow-starting ways.Only this time it didn’t cost them any points in the standings.Nine different players hit the score sheet as Nelson doubled the Columbia Valley Rockies 6-3 in Kootenay International Junior Hockey League action Sunday afternoon at the NDCC Arena.The win, coupled with a 5-1 shellacking of the Kamloops Storm Saturday, is the fourth straight for the Green and White and moves the Leafs into a third-place tie with the Spokane Braves. Nelson has won six of seven games.“This feels good . . . we’re pretty confident now so we feel pretty good,” said Leaf forward Colton Schell.Schell, teaming up with newcomer Brennan Foreman, scored the Leafs final goal during a three-goal third period that iced the contest for Nelson. But it was the slow start that had the players talking.“We came out flat at the start thinking that this was going to be an easy game,” explained Schell as the Leafs met last place Rockies with only five wins on the season. “For some reason our first periods have been bad all year. Maybe it’s a lack of preparation but we need to focus better.”Patrick Martens, on the power play, and Stephen Hynes of the Rockies scored in the first period. Nelson took control of the game in the second, outscoring the Rockies 2-1 in the second on goals by Gavin Currie and Evan J Moir, scoring his first of the season.Foreman, Currie and Schell completed the scoring for Columbia Valley in the third.Marcus Beesley stopped 20 of 23 shots, including a few of the spectacular variety in the third, to register the win. Nelson out shot Columbia Valley 34-23.Saturday the Leafs knocked off one of the hottest teams in the KIJHL in the Kamloops Storm. “We came out knowing (Kamloops) is one of the top teams in the league and if we want to be one of those teams we had to beat them and we did,” said Schell of the four-goal win over the Storm.Connor McLaughlin, who has been scoring goals wherever he’s playing, netted a pair to lead the Leafs. McLaughlin, given the night off by coach Chris Shaw, helped the Trail Smoke Eaters to victory during a road trip to northern B.C. by scoring twice against Prince George. McLaughlin scored twice in the opening frame, one coming on the power play.
Martens gave Nelson a 3-0 lead before Mike McCance solved Nelson starter Darren Hogg.In the third Connor Enright and Dallon Stoddart scored to put the game away. Tanner Burns and Currie, who now leads Nelson in scoring with 33 points, added a pair of assists.LEAF BANTER: Leaf coach Chris Shaw was without assistants Jason Rushton and Sean Dooley, both in Vernon attending a coaching clinic. . . .Nelson continues to beat up on teams outside the Murdoch Division, improving to 8-2 on the season. However, it’s inside the division that the Leafs are experiencing growing pains as the Green and White are a collective 6-9 against Murdoch opponents, with four of the wins coming against Grand Forks. Nelson has yet to defeat Murdoch front running Castlegar or Beaver Valley this season. . . .Newcomers Brennan Foreman and Joel Stewart have four and two points, respectively, since joining the team Thursday in Grand Forks. . . .Nelson hosts Spokane Friday and Castlegar Saturday as the team moves back to games within the division. Saturday’s game is in the Civic Centre Arena as the Leafs help the city celebrate the arena’s 75th anniversary. [email protected]last_img read more

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49ers apologize for excluding Kaepernick from photo gallery

first_imgSANTA CLARA — Where’s Colin Kaepernick? He’s not in the NFL, and he initially was not in a 49ers photo gallery rekindling great memories of their rivalry with the Green Bay Packers.For that, the 49ers apologized Friday and hastened to make amends.“We’re looking into right now how that happened and were trying to rectify it,” general manager John Lynch said on KNBR 680-AM. “I just learned of it. Not something I’m proud of. It’s a glaring omission and we’re working to get it fixed.”San …last_img

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Hopeville: a journey of restoration

first_img7 September 2010 New South African film Hopeville spreads the message that even one person, when they have the courage to take action, can make a big difference in many lives. Shot in Waterval Boven in Mpumalanga province and featuring a stellar cast of local actors, Hopeville is directed by John Trengrove and produced by Curious Pictures, with music by producer/composer Murray Anderson. The film opened at 13 Nu Metro and 20 Ster-Kinekor theatres countrywide, as well as a handful of independent cinemas, on 3 September. MediaClubSouthAfrica Free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service. A new start Amos, a reformed alcoholic, is a man looking for a new start. When he arrives in the fictional town of Hopeville with his estranged son, who has been put into the custody of his father after his mother dies unexpectedly, he faces a tough battle with corrupt officials and an apathetic community. As part of his custody agreement, Amos has promised to encourage his son’s promising swimming career, but the pool in Hopeville contains only garbage and stagnant puddles of water. Amos decides to clean it up for his son’s sake, and the project soon captures the attention and goodwill of the community, who begin to pitch in. The mayor, however, is not pleased because he and his cronies have decided to build a liquor store on the land, and Amos faces fierce resistance, intimidation and threats. He is going to need all his courage, and the support of the residents, if he is to complete the restoration of the pool. A restrained, dignified performance by lead actor Themba Ndaba (Generations) as Amos contrasts with the over-the-top bad guy portrayals of local comedian Desmond Dube (Hotel Rwanda) as the corrupt mayor, and audience favourite Fana Makoena (Generations) as his shady sidekick. “Amos’s journey will touch a lot of people, as we see somebody trying to put things right,” said Ndaba. Others in the cast include Terry Pheto of Oscar-winning Tsotsi fame, Nat Singo (Beat the Drum) as Amos’s son Themba, Jonathan Pienaar (The Lab), and the ever-popular Leleti Khumalo (Invictus, Cry, the Beloved Country). Hopeville tackles contemporary issues of great relevance to South Africans, such as service delivery, social and moral values, crime and corruption, and the relationships of family and friends.Television spin-off Hopeville was inspired by the 2009 television series of the same name, also produced by Curious Pictures. The series producers considered more than 70 locations before settling on the scenic town of Waterval Boven, sitting on the very edge of the escarpment between the high- and low-lying areas of Mpumalanga. The town is popular for fly-fishing, rock-climbing and hiking, and features a number of historical and national monument sites dating back to the days of the Nederlandsche Zuid-Afrikaansch Spoorweg-Maatschappij, which operated in the late 19th century. The film’s cast is largely the same as that of the series, as is the story. NGO Heartlines, in partnership with SABC Education, commissioned the series as part of its work of using television and film to help South Africans strive towards the values of humility, compassion, responsibility, perseverance, and other positive goals, in their lives. The six-episode series aired for the first time in March 2009, and was re-broadcast in September that year. Recently it was nominated for competition in the Rose d’Or, a prestigious international festival featuring the best in entertainment television. The competition takes place every year in Lucerne, Switzerland. Hopeville is one of 110 shows which made it through to the competition round, out of 515 entries submitted. It will compete in the Drama and Mini-series category. Previous winners of the top prize, the Golden Rose, include The Muppet Show (1977), Mr Bean (1990), Little Britain (2005) and The Eternity Man (2009). “What I love about Heartlines’ work is that they allow us to talk about social issues, which opens up dialogues between different people,” said Jonathan Pienaar, who plays Fred Palmer in the series and film. Beautifully filmed and deftly acted, Hopeville will leave audiences inspired to imitate Amos’s actions and do some good in their communities, even if it is something small, without waiting for someone else to step in. First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

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SaaS: Growth, but not Problem Free

first_imgCutter Consortium has released a report by Jeffrey Kaplan titled Software-as-a-Service on the Rise.  The analysis says that their survey gives “proof” that the “interest and adoption of on-demand software solutions is accelerating” and that “a third of organizations are already using SaaS solutions and an equal portion are considering SaaS.”The numbers from the survey do show a jump in interest in SaaS from 34% to 43%, but the number of SaaS users actually hasn’t changed between 2005 and 2006.  One might have expected that, given the overall upward trend of SaaS, the percentage of real SaaS adoptors would have increased over the last year.  That’s a little surprising.  It looks like conversion of tire-kickers into adoptors will be the challenge for 2007.The report also concludes that ROI and cost-effectiveness is the main driver for why companies are moving towards the SaaS model.Kaplan also noted that statisfaction rates of SaaS users slipped from 90% last year to 80% this year.  Kaplan says a drop like that is natural during the early going for any new technology and he attributes it to unrealistic expectations from users of SaaS.  Like any software product users need to do their homework and thoroughly evaluate vendor capabilities before making a selection.Kaplan gives SaaS high marks for reliability and functionality, but in the area of cost savings, the top reason wny SaaS is attracting attention, it hasn’t matched people’s expectations.  Startup costs related to integration and data migration often made the move to SaaS more expensive than expected.SaaS has a lot of positives, but like any technology, it is often hard for reality to live up the hype.last_img read more

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But What I Really Want to Know Is, Are You Experienced?

first_imgYour dream client asks the question: “So, do you have experience working with clients in our industry?” You’re enveloped in fear and sweat. It’s the question you were afraid you might be asked.The truth is that you don’t have experience in their industry. You’ve never worked with a client in their vertical. But you know the right answer is supposed to be in the affirmative.You can’t lie and say that you have experience you don’t have (and nor would you). But if you admit that you don’t have the experience, you fear that you will lose the business to one of your competitors with experience working with similar clients.You are going to tell the truth. But how you tell the truth can make the difference.What Do I Need to KnowIt doesn’t matter whether or not your dream client’s industry isn’t as different as they believe it to be. But challenging your dream client’s reality only brings resistance. Their belief that their business is different is embedded in their question. So you allow them to keep that belief.The honest answer that keeps you in the game sounds like this: “No, we don’t have experience working with clients in your space. We have some suspicions about what we might have to do different to work with you, but I’d love to hear you share what you believe we’d need to know to be an effective partner for you. Can you share your ideas with me?”Can We Still Win?You follow up directly and candidly any answers that might disqualify you .You might say something that sounds like this: “It sounds to me like experience working in your industry is somewhat important to you. Is there a way that we could demonstrate our ability and prove that we are the right choice for you without that experience? What would we need to do for you to be comfortable making that decision?”Here’s a follow on to your follow on: “Are there other verticals that we might serve that would demonstrate our ability to be the right choice for you?”These questions ensure that you aren’t wasting your time—or your dream client’s time—if you aren’t going to be considered. Avoiding difficult questions doesn’t improve the likelihood of your winning an opportunity.Turn It Upside DownSometimes, just for fun, I exaggerate my response to all of the client’s “unique” and “special” challenges. I say something like: “Wow! You really have a unique set of challenges! In fact, I’ve never even heard of anyone experiencing these challenges before.” Normally the client laughs, knowing that the challenges they face aren’t all that unique, and if you can serve other industries, you can probably serve them just as effectively. They say, “I know. It’s always the same kinds of problems, isn’t it?”The Last WordIf you don’t have experience in your dream client’s industry, you don’t have it. Deal with it directly, and ask what you need to do to prove you can succeed without it—and the opportunity to gain that experience.QuestionsHow do you answer questions about experience when you don’t have it?Is the right answer embedded in the question? How do you open the possibility that it isn’t as important as they might believe?Are most of the solutions you offer easily ported from one industry to another?What are some of the special, unique situational needs some of your clients have? Can you leverage your experience serving them to help company’s in other verticals?last_img read more

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Over 1,900 Children Diverted From State Care

first_img The Child and Family Support Unit (CFSU) of the Child Development Agency (CDA) has implemented strategies to successfully divert 1,901 children from becoming wards of the State. Story Highlights She noted that the main thrust of the Diversion Programme, which began in 2009, is to keep these children who are at risk of being abused from ending up in State care facilities. Speaking in a recent interview with JIS News, Team Leader at the CDA and Overseer in the Child Support Unit, Jean Duhaney, indicated that since the start of the year, there have been 1,924 cases where interventions took place. The Child and Family Support Unit (CFSU) of the Child Development Agency (CDA) has implemented strategies to successfully divert 1,901 children from becoming wards of the State.Speaking in a recent interview with JIS News, Team Leader at the CDA and Overseer in the Child Support Unit, Jean Duhaney, indicated that since the start of the year, there have been 1,924 cases where interventions took place.Of that number, she noted that 23 children ended up in State care.“One of the major reasons why some children end up in State care facilities is the lack of information, especially as it relates to alternative disciplinary measures,” said Ms. Duhaney.She noted that the main thrust of the Diversion Programme, which began in 2009, is to keep these children who are at risk of being abused from ending up in State care facilities.The preferred alternative, she said, is to keep them within their family setting while providing the necessary training support to the families to deal with the challenges that they face.Ms. Duhaney also pointed out that there is need for parents or caregivers to unearth the underlying factors influencing deviant behaviour in children in an effort to properly address the issues.She indicated that there are cases where frustrated parents have come in to the CFSU to complain about children displaying maladaptive behaviours, and insisted on leaving the children in their offices because they are uncertain of what to do under the circumstances.She informed that the Unit has been able to empower such parents through exposure to alternative behavior-modification strategies, and the situations have greatly improved.In the meantime, Ms. Duhaney also noted that during the summer break, children who would have otherwise been unengaged and prone to mischief, benefited from a summer camp organised by the CFSU.They were engaged in various activities such as music, dance, drama, drawing, painting and sewing, among other things.Ms. Duhaney told JIS News that at the end of the camp, children received back-to school packages, which assisted in alleviating some of the financial pressure on the parents.Individuals, who are in need of intervention or support from the CFSU, may visit the office at 40 Duke Street, Kingston, or call 948-1145.Ms. Duhaney also made an appeal for persons wanting to lend their support to the programme through volunteerism, or in any other way, to make contact with the CFSUlast_img read more

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