Supreme Court of Canada Refuses To Hear Case

first_img The Supreme Court of Canada will not hear the Nova Scotia HumanRights Commission’s appeal of a decision that the commission saidraises questions about harassment and diversity in Canadianworkplaces. “We’re disappointed,” said commission CEO Mayann Francis. “We hadhoped the Supreme Court of Canada would provide legal guidance,not just for Nova Scotians but for all Canadian workplaces. Thestandards have already been established for sexual harassment. Wethought this case might help establish clearer guidelines fordealing with discrimination and the cultural differences onefinds in a diverse workplace.” The Supreme Court announced today, April 28, that it will nothear an appeal in the case of Dorothy Kateri Moore, of Membertou.The court does not give reasons for dismissal of leaveapplications. Ms. Moore filed a complaint with the Nova Scotia Human RightsCommission in 1999, alleging that Trevor Muller, the owner ofPlay it Again Sports in Sydney, and Ronald Muller, a co-worker,discriminated against her when they referred to her as”kemosabe.” An independent board of inquiry was held into the complaint. Thechair of that board of inquiry, David J. MacDonald, ruled inFebruary of 2004 that discrimination did not take place becauseMs. Moore had not clearly shown she was offended by the remark. The Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission appealed the ruling tothe Nova Scotia Court of Appeal — arguing that the independentboard had erred by placing an undue burden on the complainant toprove that she found the term offensive. In October 2004, the Court of Appeal rejected that argument,upholding the independent board of inquiry’s decision. JusticeDavid Chipman, writing for the three-member appeal court panel,concluded Ms. Moore had not shown that the term was “notoriouslyoffensive.” Ann E. Smith, legal counsel for the Nova Scotia Human RightsCommission, said the commission had hoped the Supreme Court couldclarify that term. “People need to understand what that phrasemeans in order to determine what is or is not consideredacceptable behaviour in the workplace,” she said. “What Iconsider ‘notoriously offensive’ you may not. We wanted somelegal standard that would help people.” Ms. Smith said the Supreme Court does not give explanations forthe cases it accepts or denies. “The Supreme Court’s refusal tohear the case in no way indicates that the questions we haveraised are not worth pursuing. It simply means the issue is notone the Supreme Court wanted to address at this time.” Ms. Francis said that means that the commission will continue toconsider other ways of clarifying the parameters. “Attitudes regarding diversity — and understanding of thecultural differences in the way that individuals deal withdifficulties — have far-reaching implications for Nova Scotia’sracially visible, African Nova Scotian and First Nationscommunities,” she said. “They will impact future immigrationpatterns and, therefore, the province’s economic future. We needto continue to work on this. “This is about much more than the use of one word. It’s aboutestablishing standards that are clear to employers and toemployees, standards that protect and encourage diversity andthat protect every person’s rights under the Human Rights Act.” Copies of the original decision by the independent board ofinquiry and the ruling of the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal areavailable on the commission’s website atgov.ns.ca/humanrights/decisions/2004decisions.htm HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION–Supreme Court of Canada Refuses To HearCaselast_img read more

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To arrange money for marriage man plotted robbery

first_imgNew Delhi: Delhi Police on Sunday said that they have arrested a person who scripted a robbery plot of 10 Lakh rupees in Outer North area. Police claimed that the accused wanted to marry her girlfriend for which he committed the offence. Police identified the accused as Gagandeep (22) and his associate Vivek Raghav (30). Complainant ( now accused) Gagandeep had reported the robbery of Rs 10 lakh at Narela Ind. Area police station on the intervening night of 11-12 July. Also Read – Bangla Sahib Gurudwara bans use of all types of plastic itemsDeputy Commissioner of Police (Outer-North) Gaurav Sharma said that as per his statement accused’s employer sent him to Karol Bagh to procure Rs 10 lakh. He claimed while coming back to DSIIDC in Narela, two men on a bike snatched his bag containing money. Later, the accused’s story turned out to be fake. When he was further examined he disclosed some points which were he is a regular spectator of TV serial based on crime. He was aware of how police track a criminal. Gagandeep was in love with a girl and going to marry her on July 20. For that reason he needed money. Further, he was aware that he had gained faith of his employer and his employer has shifted to Panipat. This was the last money transaction through him so he changed his mind and plotted this story with his friend Vivek Raghav.last_img read more

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Viet Nam Children at risk of malnutrition in aftermath of Typhoon Damrey

Typhoon Damrey, or ‘Storm No.12,’ made landfall early Saturday morning, 4 November, hitting communities with pre-existing malnutrition concerns and lack of information on preparedness and protection from the disaster and its aftermath. “During a rapid assessment mission, [our] staff met with several vulnerable children […] who suffered much more from the ongoing consequences of the typhoon,” the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) said Monday. An estimated 150,000 children under the age of five are at risk of malnutrition and over 80,000 pregnant and nursing women in need special care. One such case is that of 11-month-old Ngan, who lives in a small fishing community in Phu Yen (about 1,200 kilometres from the capital, Hanoi), whose father is a casual worker on a fishing boat and the family is struggling to make ends meet, even during normal times. In the chaos during the first two days after the storm, Ngan’s parents were unable to find meat or fish on the local market and though there is food available now, the family cannot afford to buy sufficient quantities, resulting in reduced portions. Ngan’s mother is also not getting enough nutrition and has difficulty producing enough milk to breastfeed her child. According to UNICEF, in addition to malnutrition, children are also exposed to an increased risk of waterborne diseases as drinking water supply was interrupted for several days after the storm and people had to resort to unclean water for their consumption. Sanitation systems and latrines were also damaged, leaving people at increased risk of disease. “[We are] stepping up efforts to support national relief efforts to help the most affected families and children,” said the UN agency in the release. “Specific interventions look at addressing the increased risk of malnutrition through micronutrients and calories supplements for children and breastfeeding mothers and by training health workers on how to detect and treat malnutrition,” it added, noting also the importance of raising public awareness in the affected regions. As of this weekend, 123 people have died or are missing as a result of the storm. Overall, 4.33 million people are estimated to have been affected and among them 395,000 are in need of assistance. The typhoon damaged 137,836 houses and destroyed 3,483. Other UN agencies, including the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the UN Development Programme (UNDP) have also been assisting in the response. read more

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