USI Board of Trustees Approves New Degree In Statistics, Reviews Campus Master Plan

first_imgAt its regular meeting on Thursday, March 1, the University of Southern Indiana Board of Trustees approved a Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science in Statistics degree program to be offered through the Pott College of Science, Engineering, and Education. The proposed degree program moves next to the Indiana Commission for Higher Education for approval.The proposed program will support the Pott College’s commitment to prepare individuals with rigorous and diverse experiences, both within the program and across the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. Students pursuing degrees in mathematics, computer science, social science, or other programs may complement their degrees with coursework or a second major in statistics.The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates statisticians will be the ninth fastest growing occupation in the 10-year period from 2014 to 2024 with an estimated growth rate of 34 percent. Similarly, the Indiana Department of Workforce Development’s Occupational Demand Report estimates that there will be a 39 percent increase in the need for statisticians in Indiana across the same period. This ranks as the fourth largest change in the state, and the third largest change among occupations requiring a college degree.In other business, the USI Board of Trustees heard a report on the new 10-year campus master plan from SmithGroupJJR, the lead consultants on the planning team. The plan, a result of a 12-month process beginning in January 2017, ensures that near-term physical projects align with long-term goals and strategic plans.The board also approved retirements, including those of Dr. Linda L. M. Bennett, president, and Cindy Brinker, vice president for Government and University Relations. The conferral of degrees was approved for the spring 2018 Commencement Exercises on Friday, April 27 and Saturday, April 28.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Tameside student win Hovis scholarship

first_imgThe Hovis Scholarship Award has been given to Gabrielle Baxter from Tameside College, who will get the chance to obtain first-hand bakery experience working with industry professionals. The scholarship, created by Rank Hovis, is awarded to one student a year for an all-expenses-paid learning experience. Baxter underwent an interview for the award, in which she discussed her progress to date and career aspirations.Baxter will start work at Southampton Mill, which specialises in flour testing and milling. She will be assisted by Christopher Foxall, a representative from Premier Foods, during her scholarship, which will see her travel around the UK, visiting bakery institutions including flour mills, testing centres and local independent bakeries, as well as larger chain bakeries. The trip concludes in Lichfield, where Baxter will learn about healthy food production at Holgran.“Gabrielle is the first student from the college to win the scholarship award and the entire bakery department is very proud of her achievements. She has won many competitions since starting at the college and I’m sure she’ll continue to excel,” commented Tameside bakery tutor Lorna Jones.last_img read more

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Middlebury wants public input on plan for 2030

first_img Previous articleFree Fishing this weekend in IndianaNext articleWorkOne centers to being reopening June 8 Carl Stutsman Pinterest By Carl Stutsman – June 4, 2020 0 327 Pinterest Middlebury wants public input on plan for 2030 Facebook Twitter Facebook WhatsApp Google+ Google+ Twitter WhatsApp IndianaLocalNews Credit: Town of Middlebury FB Page Middlebury is looking for more community engagement as they look to update a plan for the town’s future in 2030. The idea behind the “Middlebury 2030 Comprehensive Plan” is to lay out, in one document, a vision for what Middlebury wants to look like in ten years and the best strategies to get there.What they want is public input and ideas as the make potential revisions. The plans steering committee said in a release “This Plan will continue to encourage and support the ‘Makers’ spirit and the passing on the traditional values” of Middlebury.READ MORE HERE WITH THE ELKHART TRUTHThey are holding a virtual public open house June 23rd to talk about the 2030 plan and its implementation.last_img read more

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SEAS computer science faculty to teach short courses for execs

first_imgWorking professionals and executives can now enroll in one- and two-day intensive programs exploring cutting-edge topics in information technology thanks to a collaboration between Harvard’s Division of Continuing Education and computer science faculty from the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).The newly created professional development initiative will address a growing need among organizations to keep their managers up-to-speed in rapidly changing technology environments. Participants will benefit from interacting with some of the most notable teachers and researchers in their fields, all in state-of-the-art classrooms on the Harvard campus.The information technology programs will cover a range of topics, including data visualization and social networks, enabling participants to apply current research to solve problems in their own organizations.last_img read more

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Health care disparities for disabled

first_imgTwo decades after the Americans with Disabilities Act went into effect, people with disabilities continue to face difficulties meeting major social needs, including obtaining appropriate access to health care facilities and services.In an article in the October issue of Health Affairs, Lisa Iezzoni, director of the Mongan Institute for Health Policy at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard professor of medicine, analyzes available information on disparities affecting people with disabilities and highlights barriers that continue to restrict their access to health services.“A lot of attention has been paid to how health disparities affect people in racial and ethnic minority groups, and this report details how people with disabilities are also disadvantaged,” she says. “Most of the literature about these problems has appeared in disability-centered journals that are not very accessible to many people, so one of my goals in putting together this analysis was bringing this information to a high-visibility, broadly accessible journal.”Iezzoni, who has used a wheelchair for nearly 25 years because of multiple sclerosis, explains, “An analogy I use to illustrate how disparities among racial and ethnic minorities differ from those affecting people with disabilities is that Rosa Parks made progress towards civil rights when she could get onto that bus and sit anywhere she wanted to. I can’t even get onto a bus unless it is adapted for my needs, the bus driver notices me, recognizes my disability, and reacts to it. That kind of need for proactive accommodation applies to health care facilities as well.”The 2010 census found that 54 million Americans — nearly 20 percent of the population — were then living with disabilities. Less than half of adults with disabilities were employed, and 27 percent of those with severe disabilities fell below the poverty rate, compared with 9 percent of those without disabilities. Iezzoni’s review of several broad-based surveys found that people with disabilities were significantly more likely to report being in fair or poor health than were those without disabilities. They also had higher levels of risk factors such as obesity, smoking, and physical inactivity, some which could be linked to a decreased likelihood that primary care physicians would address those issues during routine visits.In her review of how disability is defined and addressed by the health care system, Iezzoni cites a significant change from an approach centered on available medical solutions coupled with patients’ adjusting to their limitations — the prevalent viewpoint of the 19th and early 20th century — to the more recent focus on changing the physical, attitudinal, and social barriers that compound restrictions imposed by specific physical impairments. She writes that a 2001 report from the World Health Organization  (WHO) “shift(s) the focus from prevention or cure to maximizing functioning and well-being,” adding that the Institute of Medicine, in recommending that the WHO framework be broadly adopted, acknowledged that “no single definition of disability can serve all societal needs.”Reported disparities in preventive health care services include lower rates of mammography and Pap tests among women with disabilities. A review of data from National Cancer Institute registries — coupled with Medicare data — indicated that women with disabilities diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer were less likely to receive breast-conserving surgery and that those who did were less likely to receive the radiation therapy that treatment protocol requires. Similarly, patients with disabilities diagnosed with the most deadly form of lung cancer were less likely to receive surgery, the only definitive treatment. For both types of tumor, people with disabilities were significantly more likely to die from their cancers.Iezzoni also cites a major survey’s findings that women with mobility disabilities were 70 percent less likely to be asked about contraception during routine medical visits, even though they could be at increased risk of unintended pregnancy because of difficulty using barrier contraceptives or would face heightened risk of complications from birth control pills. Problems accessing health care facilities — including physician offices and hospital buildings — were often reported; and equipment such as examining tables, mammography machines, or infusion chairs were frequently inaccessible. One major academic health center did not have a wheelchair-accessible scale, requiring a breast cancer patient with paraplegia to be carried onto a standard scale by her oncologist, because the patient’s weight is essential to calculating chemotherapy dosage.“People with disabilities want to be as involved in their care as anyone else would be,” says Iezzoni. “They don’t want to be picked up and placed onto the exam table. If they’re able to get onto a table, they want to move themselves; but they need a table they can get onto — one that automatically lowers to allow them to transfer. Another problem is that most clinicians only see patients with disabilities in the office or in the hospital. They don’t see what the patients are doing out in the community. Health care professionals need to understand that people with disabilities have lives outside of their health care needs — lives in which they may be very active and accomplished. The health care system needs to work on making the accommodations required for effective communication and on giving all patients appropriate physical access.”last_img read more

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New Year, New Beer

first_imgOne of the greatest trends in craft beer right now is the boom of session IPAs. Picture this: a beer that tastes like one of those hop-bomb IPAs that American craft breweries are known for brewing, but with really low alcohol levels. Like, the same amount of alcohol as those crappy macro lagers we all grew up drinking.  It’s pretty much the sweet spot, because you get the flavor of craft beer married with the drinkability of say, a Bud Light.Within the last couple of years, every brewery has thrown a session IPA into the market. And I mean every brewery. Oskar Blues is now officially in the session IPA game with a brand new beer called Pinner, which is loaded with a handful of different varieties of hops, but comes in at a low, low 4.9% ABV. They call it a “throwback” IPA because, you know, you can throw them back one after the other.It has that citrus nose you’d expect from an IPA, and plenty of grapefruit and zest in the sip. It doesn’t have the malty backbone that most IPAs have, and that’s something I’ve noticed from a lot of session IPAs across the board. They’ve got the hops down, and the citrus aspect, and they’re dank in a certain way, but they’re not terribly complex.Of course, that’s just comparing this new breed of session IPAs to their full-bodied IPA counterpart. Pit these session IPAs against most lagers or pilsners or even pale ales that have similarly low ABVs, and they shine like the North Star. And Pinner definitely shines. It’s a beer I could throwback over and over again. Long live the session IPA.– Graham Averill is a contributor to B.R.O. and runs his own blog about being a stay-at-home dad called Daddy Drinks.last_img read more

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What is fair and not fair when it comes to lending?

first_imgby: Mike TannerIn the past, fair lending and redlining were terms you only heard about when mortgage lending was discussed.  Financial institutions simply needed to gather the required information for the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) and put controls in place to ensure they did not discriminate when approving or declining loans.  Those were the simple days.Currently, the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau (CFPB) has taken the lead in interpreting what is fair and not fair when it comes to lending.  The result is fair lending concerns and violations now extend to pretty much every loan product that is offered.  Complex logarithms are used by the CFPB to determine race and ethnicity to uncover fair lending violations. In addition, not only do you have to be concerned about approvals and denials you need to be concerned about the terms.So what can you do ensure you are meeting the CFPB’s new fair lending standard?  Here are few things to consider when reviewing you fair lending plan:Is the loan approval process automated or manual? continue reading » 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Rockville Centre Man Admits Stealing $1.3M from Nonprofits

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Rockville Centre man has admitted to embezzling nearly $1.3 million from two women and two nonprofits that raises funds to help children with special needs children.Drew Morgan pleaded guilty Friday at Nassau County court to grand larceny. Judge Philip Grella is expected to sentence the 44-year-old man on May 22 to 3-1/3 to 10 years in prison and to order him pay full restitution to his victims.“Drew Morgan used his position as treasurer and president of two nonprofit organizations to steal money that should have been used to enrich the lives of children and adults with special needs,” Acting Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas said.Prosecutors said he embezzled $1,086,453 from the Anchor Building Fund, Inc. while acting as its treasurer of the not-for-profit corporation that runs Camp A.N.C.H.O.R., which is short for Answering the Needs of Citizens with Handicaps through Organized Recreation—a program serves children and adults with special needs—between 2008 and 2013He also stole $130,558 more between June 2010 and December 2012 from the Corporation for the Social and Exceptionally Challenged Kids, a nonprofit that raised funds for Camp A.N.C.H.O.R. and Impact OASIS, a group that promotes the acceptance and inclusion of people autism.Investigators uncovered the alleged thefts while examining Morgan’s bank records during a separate probe into allegations he stole $475,000 from two sisters that hired him as their financial planner as the principal of DKM Financial Corp. and owner of Rockstead Venture Capital LLC.Prosecutors said that he spent the victims’ investment to pay for a membership in the Hempstead Golf Club, airline travel and hotel stays, restaurants, credit and debit card purchases, appliances, home furnishings and personal expenses between 2008 and 2010.Morgan was arrested on Oct. 2, 2013.last_img read more

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Drucker, Imbroto Running to Replace Nassau Legis. Judy Jacobs

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Two lawyers from Plainview were recently nominated to run in the Nov. 8 special election to fill the seat vacated by Nassau County Legis. Judy Jacobs (D-Woodbury) when she died last month.Democrats tapped Arnold Drucker, 59, a member of the Nassau Community College (NCC) Board of Trustees who has a Queens-based private law practice. Republicans picked Louis Imbroto, 32, associate general counsel at Nassau University Medical Center, who previously served as Assistant Town Attorney for the Town of Oyster Bay. Drucker also has the Independence and Work Families party lines while Imbroto has the Conservative and Tax Revolt party lines.Residents will have a chance to hear the rivals’ positions on issues affecting the county when The League of Women Voters hosts a candidate forum 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 1 at the Plainview-Old Bethpage Public Library, located at 999 Old Country Rd. in Plainview.Imbroto previously ran against Jacobs in 2013 and tried to unseat New York State Assemb. Charles Lavine (D-Glen Cove) in ’12 and ’14. He also chairs the Nassau County Youth Cabinet and previously worked at the Long Island Contractors’ Association as well as in private practice.Drucker previously served as co-chair of a presidential search committee at NCC, which this summer tapped former Farmingdale State College President H. Hubert Keen as its new leader. This is Drucker’s first run for elected office.Jacobs was an 11-term county legislator and 20-year veteran lawmaker who served seven years as the legislature’s first Democratic presiding officer before she died Sept. 13 at age 77. She was among four remaining county lawmakers that have been serving on the 19-member Nassau legislature since its inception in 1996. She got her start in politics as a civic leader.Jacobs represented the 16th Legislative District, which encompassed the North Shore communities of Plainview, Old Bethpage, Jericho, Syosset, Woodbury, Hicksville, Old Westbury and Roslyn Heights.County Executive Ed Mangano set the special election to fill her vacancy for Election Day. The winner will serve the remaining year of her last two-year term and will face re-election again in 2017. Republicans currently have a 12-6 majority in the chamber.last_img read more

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